Hot answers tagged

4

You're right on the common combination of pedio and brett due to diacetyl production. But pedio doesn't start working for 2-4 months, and has a time-frame of 4-9+ months. So you have plenty of time to source brett to add to help with diacetyl production from the pedio. I'm honestly not sure if a traditional lager-style diacetyl rest (probably with ...


2

You can certainly pitch the Brett later. As mentioned the Brett will help with diacetyl, but it also helps with the ropey dextrinous 'gunk' that Pedi starts to throw in there. Without Brett that stuff doesn't clear out very easily. You need Brett to break that stuff down.


2

An unorthodox (by today's standards) way to deal with it is the really old school way of using mustard seed. When beer turns ropy without being sour, it is easily restored by mixing in the proportion of one spoonful of mustard to every fourteen gallons, in a little of the beer, and pouring it into the bung-hole. In the course of the next day ...


2

I don't see why this won't work, though it's unconventional. I probably would just let the carbonation off-gas naturally. You might also want to hold off on the fruit until nearer the end of the souring/aging, although if you add it at this point it will provide some more sugars for the bugs. Maltodextrin could be added as well for more sugars. Don't forget ...


1

Traditionally the wort is put in a cold ship over night to inoculate . This is a large shallow vat to maximize air exposure for spontanuous fermintation. Once wort is inoculated the growth phase happens pretty fast, and the brewer is happy. I don't know of any method outside of a lab to test if there is X many yeast cells in Y volume of air. Most of these ...


1

I can think of two reasons why your mead is sour: Pomegranate juice is sour, with a pH of around 3.0. Assuming you've made 1 gallon batch, 16oz of pomegranate juice is enough to be noticeably tart. 16 oz of a pH 3.0 liquid diluted to 1 gallon yields a pH of around 3.9 which, without any sugar to balance the acid, would taste quite sour. Your mead was ...


1

According to the guys at this sour-only brewery they use only glass, stainless or wood. Plastic lets in too much oxygen, leading to acetic acid. Also, the shape of a barrel allows them to eliminate the air space above the beer by topping up periodically with fermented beer. BTW that link is a 3-1/2 hour podcast, but I'm 95% confident the content is in ...


1

If its done fermenting getting it into bottles is better than a plastic bucket. All buckets absorb/transmit O2 at some rate. And depending on your lid, it might not be the plastic at all that's introducing O2. The O2 will ingress regardless of the CO2 unless its pressure is high (which it isn't). It will attempt to equilibrate no matter what. O2 comes ...


1

This is a very broad question but here's some direction: ...and the usefulness of this answer depends on whether you are planning on starting a long term barrel project or a medium term sour beer or a very quick sour batch... Something is growing, but it is certainly changing the ratios of different critters. My thinking would be to split the starter up ...


1

Try getting the must pH to greater than 5,aim for around 5.4. Then add some extra yeast. Only do this if your addition of CaCO3 was not successfully fixed the pH.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible