Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


6

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


5

Without a photo, it sounds like you have the makings of a pellicle, although the statement "a thick ropiness below the surface" is a bit confusing. Pellicles form on top of the beer, and have the appearance of anything from a slightly translucent film to what looks like a long-lasting, inanimate krausen. Sometimes people use the term ropiness to describe a ...


3

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


3

Don't know if are other species used in homebrew, actually I've never go that way before, but this two species that you cited above, Lactobacillus delbruekii and Lactobacillus brevis are homofermentative, and heterofermentative, respectively, according to this text of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology (page 3): Lactobacillus is very heterogeneous ...


2

There are a couple things you can try adding to a glass of the beer. The sodium and chloride in salt will aid in the perception of sweetness, so you could try adding a bit to a glass. Too much, though, will obviously give you a salty flavor. You can also add calcium chloride to the glass to enhance the perception if maltiness and sweetness. Again, start ...


2

Brett has very low flocculation, so unlike a Sacc. starter, where you can only pitch the concentrated sediment of flocculated yeast, with Brett you'll need to pitch the "bottom half" of the starter volume to make sure you get most of the yeast. While you could just pitch the whole volume, since brett needs larger, lager-sized starters, you want to decant at ...


1

You could blend the beer with maltier/sweeter beer in the glass to change your perception. Different brewing salts may help but they some are not easily dissolved into cold and carbonated beer, if in fact that's the status of your beer now. In general I always find it better to learn what went wrong and try and fix that than fix the beer. Time better spent ...


1

Driftwood, here in Victoria, brews Bird of Prey and Lustrum as seasonal release, both sour ales. If you're in Vancouver, you might be able to find a bottle or two at a specialty private liquor store.


1

You should be good with bottling as normal. I prefer mixing the sugar and beer in a bucket to even out the carbonation levels. After a year the brettanomyces has brought the gravity down very low so I wouldn't worry about bottle bombs. Also, if you pasteurize or sulfite the beer you are robbing yourself of the beer developing further complexities. If you are ...


1

Force carb using a carb cap and PET soda bottle. Step by step: Find the appropriate blend Scale your blending "recipe" up or down to meet your bottling needs Add this blend in a PET soda bottle Apply carb cap CO2 purge a couple times (apply little CO2, don't shake, let sit, open cap. repeat) Force carb by shaking (apply high CO2, shake, let sit, test. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible