Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Don't know if are other species used in homebrew, actually I've never go that way before, but this two species that you cited above, Lactobacillus delbruekii and Lactobacillus brevis are homofermentative, and heterofermentative, respectively, according to this text of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology (page 3): Lactobacillus is very heterogeneous ...


2

Brett has very low flocculation, so unlike a Sacc. starter, where you can only pitch the concentrated sediment of flocculated yeast, with Brett you'll need to pitch the "bottom half" of the starter volume to make sure you get most of the yeast. While you could just pitch the whole volume, since brett needs larger, lager-sized starters, you want to decant at ...


2

I don't see why this won't work, though it's unconventional. I probably would just let the carbonation off-gas naturally. You might also want to hold off on the fruit until nearer the end of the souring/aging, although if you add it at this point it will provide some more sugars for the bugs. Maltodextrin could be added as well for more sugars. Don't forget ...


1

This is a very broad question but here's some direction: ...and the usefulness of this answer depends on whether you are planning on starting a long term barrel project or a medium term sour beer or a very quick sour batch... Something is growing, but it is certainly changing the ratios of different critters. My thinking would be to split the starter up ...


1

Try getting the must pH to greater than 5,aim for around 5.4. Then add some extra yeast. Only do this if your addition of CaCO3 was not successfully fixed the pH.


1

According to the guys at this sour-only brewery they use only glass, stainless or wood. Plastic lets in too much oxygen, leading to acetic acid. Also, the shape of a barrel allows them to eliminate the air space above the beer by topping up periodically with fermented beer. BTW that link is a 3-1/2 hour podcast, but I'm 95% confident the content is in ...


1

Background: I've done a few full sour-mash witbiers. I really like the effect, though it's not an everyday sort of style. Try brewing just a gallon, in case you don't like it. In my opinion, worrying about contamination in a sour mash is sort of silly, because contamination is what sours the mash. Unless you're directly inoculating the mash with a pure ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible