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5

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


3

0.5oz / 14ml of 88% sounds like far too much to me - it will really make the beer sour. I recently added 2ml of lactic acid to a batch of witbier and the beer was pleasantly sour. I could probably have doubled it to 4ml but then it would have been assertively sour. More than that I think the sourness would be overwhelming. But it's a personal preference - ...


3

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


2

I used to mash-in my berliner at 150 F, and then just let it cool down to 120 F or so. From there my souring process was pretty much identical to yours. But, I usually pitched straight L delbruckii, with a followup pitch of WLP630 or some other ale yeast(s). With multiple organisms at work, there's more potential for attenuation, and I would always see the ...


1

Force carb using a carb cap and PET soda bottle. Step by step: Find the appropriate blend Scale your blending "recipe" up or down to meet your bottling needs Add this blend in a PET soda bottle Apply carb cap CO2 purge a couple times (apply little CO2, don't shake, let sit, open cap. repeat) Force carb by shaking (apply high CO2, shake, let sit, test. ...



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