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6

Without a photo, it sounds like you have the makings of a pellicle, although the statement "a thick ropiness below the surface" is a bit confusing. Pellicles form on top of the beer, and have the appearance of anything from a slightly translucent film to what looks like a long-lasting, inanimate krausen. Sometimes people use the term ropiness to describe a ...


4

Don't know if are other species used in homebrew, actually I've never go that way before, but this two species that you cited above, Lactobacillus delbruekii and Lactobacillus brevis are homofermentative, and heterofermentative, respectively, according to this text of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology (page 3): Lactobacillus is very heterogeneous ...


3

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


2

Brett has very low flocculation, so unlike a Sacc. starter, where you can only pitch the concentrated sediment of flocculated yeast, with Brett you'll need to pitch the "bottom half" of the starter volume to make sure you get most of the yeast. While you could just pitch the whole volume, since brett needs larger, lager-sized starters, you want to decant at ...


2

There are a couple things you can try adding to a glass of the beer. The sodium and chloride in salt will aid in the perception of sweetness, so you could try adding a bit to a glass. Too much, though, will obviously give you a salty flavor. You can also add calcium chloride to the glass to enhance the perception if maltiness and sweetness. Again, start ...


1

According to the guys at this sour-only brewery they use only glass, stainless or wood. Plastic lets in too much oxygen, leading to acetic acid. Also, the shape of a barrel allows them to eliminate the air space above the beer by topping up periodically with fermented beer. BTW that link is a 3-1/2 hour podcast, but I'm 95% confident the content is in ...


1

Background: I've done a few full sour-mash witbiers. I really like the effect, though it's not an everyday sort of style. Try brewing just a gallon, in case you don't like it. In my opinion, worrying about contamination in a sour mash is sort of silly, because contamination is what sours the mash. Unless you're directly inoculating the mash with a pure ...


1

You could blend the beer with maltier/sweeter beer in the glass to change your perception. Different brewing salts may help but they some are not easily dissolved into cold and carbonated beer, if in fact that's the status of your beer now. In general I always find it better to learn what went wrong and try and fix that than fix the beer. Time better spent ...



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