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5

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


5

When it comes to home brewing sours The Mad Fermentationist should be your first stop. His blog is quite large, and full of great information. His intro to brewing sours is probably the best place to start.


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


4

Oxygen in and of itself is a staling agent, plain and simple. Some styles benefit from being a bit stale. For instance, here in the states, what we know as "British" beer is typically a bit stale simply because by the time it gets here long after being brewed and having crossed the sea in a hot ship, it's not exactly fresh. So if you want to clone your ...


4

My understanding is that the most common cause of sour flavors is a wild yeast or bacteria infestation. In a beer that is deliberately sour, a Brettanomyces yeast strain is introduced along with bacteria to create the sour flavor. Ideas: Do you bake a lot in your home? It is possible that you have airborne yeasts in your home if you bake bread at all. Try ...


4

Jamil doesn't mention raking off cake in any of those recipes. He isn't a secondary fermentation type of guy, and my experience tends to find me agreeing with him. WY3763 Roselare blend is all you need. Pitch it and wait for it to do its thing. Racking the beer only stresses the small population of bugs that you'll carry over. More importantly, racking ...


3

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


3

0.5oz / 14ml of 88% sounds like far too much to me - it will really make the beer sour. I recently added 2ml of lactic acid to a batch of witbier and the beer was pleasantly sour. I could probably have doubled it to 4ml but then it would have been assertively sour. More than that I think the sourness would be overwhelming. But it's a personal preference - ...


3

The yeast may have out paced the lacto at 74F and fermented much of your fermentables. This may leave less for the lacto to work on and it may not sour as much as you were hoping. I'd leave the whole thing in primary for 3 weeks, then sample it. If its still not soured move it from the cake to a fresh fermentor just to get off the cake as a precaution ...


2

Lactobacillus can be slow to develop but worth the wait. I would recommend bottling it and putting it in the basement for the next 6 months or so. You really can't rush these things. Wyeast's website on the subject recommends bottling after primary and waiting for a few months. It also has a ton of useful information on the subject. Lactobacillus does ...


2

Check out BYO's article great article on the difference between making your beer sour during the boil or making it sour during fermentation. In researching a Flanders Red, I found an article from Raj Apt, How to Make Sour Beer. The BJCP Style 17 also has good reference data. IMHO, most of the really tasty sour beers are getting the sour profile during ...


2

I used to mash-in my berliner at 150 F, and then just let it cool down to 120 F or so. From there my souring process was pretty much identical to yours. But, I usually pitched straight L delbruckii, with a followup pitch of WLP630 or some other ale yeast(s). With multiple organisms at work, there's more potential for attenuation, and I would always see the ...


1

You should be good with bottling as normal. I prefer mixing the sugar and beer in a bucket to even out the even out the carbonation levels. After a year the brettanomyces has brought the gravity down very low so I wouldn't worry about bottle bombs. Also, if you pasteurize or sulfite the beer you are robbing yourself of the beer developing further ...


1

Force carb using a carb cap and PET soda bottle. Step by step: Find the appropriate blend Scale your blending "recipe" up or down to meet your bottling needs Add this blend in a PET soda bottle Apply carb cap CO2 purge a couple times (apply little CO2, don't shake, let sit, open cap. repeat) Force carb by shaking (apply high CO2, shake, let sit, test. ...


1

"Graham's" post about "when do you notice the sour taste appear" is very important. If you don't already, next time you brew, draw a small sample at every step, if you can handle it, including your freshly cold full strength beer wort. When I was new to all grain brewing I had a batch go sour. When I went back through my notes, I had made a comment that ...


1

Do you ever notice a little layer of film in the neck of your bottles from the bad batches? That's a "pelicle" and is a sign of Brettanomyces/Pediococus/Lactobasilus activity. For what it's worth, I am leaning towards the theory that you had a contamination in your bottling line, probably in the spigot of the bottling bucket. I've looked in some of those ...


1

Take some and add sugar (half starter, half priming), Let it sit with a balloon or something on it to tell if positive pressure is created. This will tell you if you still have some viable yeast to condition with or if you need to pitch new yeast. If you do have to re-pitch I would probably pitch something VERY neutral and probably wouldn't do a starter, ...


1

Wild Brews, by Jeff Sparrow has a whole lot of information about how the pros do it, and has a few recipes in the back of the book, which look interesting, but I haven't tried. Yeast, by Chris White & Jamil Zainasheff has a couple of sections on Brettanomyces, which might prove useful.


1

I can't think of any Belgian sour beers that are produced using a sour mash. As far as I can recall, they all use bacteria in the fermenter to achieve it. Of course, that's not to say that you can't use a sour mash to produce a sour beer. I think that there's a Kentucky common that does that.


1

I think more important than whether a beer will benefit from oxidation is whether the flavor of the beer will benefit from being aged in an oak barrel. I think that the flavor of the oak is going to outweigh the flavor change of oxidation. In that case I would look at commercial examples that are oaked or aged in oak or bourbon barrels such as Founders KBS ...


1

Yes, I think you can just dump it right in, with no starter. Warning: I suggest that you double your normal sanitizing procedures with everything that comes in contact with the Brett. A couple of years ago I added the dregs from a couple of bottles of Orval to a batch, and the Brett showed up in quite a few of my subsequent batches. I dumped out probably ...



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