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10

I'd put my money on the wooden spoon. Legend is that in days of yore, brewers used to stir the wort with a "magic stick". If they didn't, it wouldn't ferment. The reason was the yeast imbedded in the wood. I've always been told not to use wooden spoons post boil. That makes sense to me.


10

Without a photo, it sounds like you have the makings of a pellicle, although the statement "a thick ropiness below the surface" is a bit confusing. Pellicles form on top of the beer, and have the appearance of anything from a slightly translucent film to what looks like a long-lasting, inanimate krausen. Sometimes people use the term ropiness to describe a ...


6

It is indeed not just lactobacillus, but usually a mix of lacto, pediococcus, enterobacter, acetobacter, Brettanomyces, Saccharomyces, &c. There are a number of excellent US sour producers in that area, regionally, but from further afield that you should have distribution of. I believe very few are doing a traditional Guezue Lambic, but many are doing ...


6

Don't know if there are other species used in homebrew, actually I've never gone that way before, but the two species that you cited above, Lactobacillus delbruekii and Lactobacillus brevis are homofermentative and heterofermentative respectively according to this text of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology (page 3): Lactobacillus is very ...


5

Jamil doesn't mention raking off cake in any of those recipes. He isn't a secondary fermentation type of guy, and my experience tends to find me agreeing with him. WY3763 Roselare blend is all you need. Pitch it and wait for it to do its thing. Racking the beer only stresses the small population of bugs that you'll carry over. More importantly, racking ...


5

My understanding is that the most common cause of sour flavors is a wild yeast or bacteria infestation. In a beer that is deliberately sour, a Brettanomyces yeast strain is introduced along with bacteria to create the sour flavor. Ideas: Do you bake a lot in your home? It is possible that you have airborne yeasts in your home if you bake bread at all. Try ...


5

Yeah bro, it looks like lactobacillus, it's a little yellow though so maybe it mold. Lacto usually looks white. I have some lacto going on right now, let me get a picture for you. Did you boil the chips first to sanitizes them, although the whiskey should have done the trick? It's probably a little sour now, or a lot who knows until you taste it. I'd ...


5

When it comes to home brewing sours The Mad Fermentationist should be your first stop. His blog is quite large, and full of great information. His intro to brewing sours is probably the best place to start.


4

Oxygen in and of itself is a staling agent, plain and simple. Some styles benefit from being a bit stale. For instance, here in the states, what we know as "British" beer is typically a bit stale simply because by the time it gets here long after being brewed and having crossed the sea in a hot ship, it's not exactly fresh. So if you want to clone your ...


4

The two you will want to use are either Wyeast 3763 Roeselare blend, or WLP655 Belgian Sour mix. If you want to get real squirrely, follow the Mad Fermentationist's lead and go grab a (fresh) bottle or two of your favorite sours from the store, smoothly pour out all but the last half inch of the bottle, swirl the dregs settled at the bottom of the bottle, ...


4

You're right on the common combination of pedio and brett due to diacetyl production. But pedio doesn't start working for 2-4 months, and has a time-frame of 4-9+ months. So you have plenty of time to source brett to add to help with diacetyl production from the pedio. I'm honestly not sure if a traditional lager-style diacetyl rest (probably with newly-...


3

Another thing to consider along with the wooden spoon is if you grind your grains in the same room as you brew. Lactobacillus comes from the grains and while grinding or even pouring out of the bag, tiny grain particles can float in the air for a while like dust. These small particles can then find their way into your cooled wort or fermentation vessel. ...


3

0.5oz / 14ml of 88% sounds like far too much to me - it will really make the beer sour. I recently added 2ml of lactic acid to a batch of witbier and the beer was pleasantly sour. I could probably have doubled it to 4ml but then it would have been assertively sour. More than that I think the sourness would be overwhelming. But it's a personal preference - ...


3

The yeast may have out paced the lacto at 74F and fermented much of your fermentables. This may leave less for the lacto to work on and it may not sour as much as you were hoping. I'd leave the whole thing in primary for 3 weeks, then sample it. If its still not soured move it from the cake to a fresh fermentor just to get off the cake as a precaution ...


2

No need for a starter when its going to be sitting there for that long. Just time is all that's needed.


2

Yes, the reason for doing this pre-boil is so you can achieve the sourness you want, then kill the bacteria. That way it doesn't interfere with your yeast and let the sourness get out of control.


2

Lactobacillus can be slow to develop but worth the wait. I would recommend bottling it and putting it in the basement for the next 6 months or so. You really can't rush these things. Wyeast's website on the subject recommends bottling after primary and waiting for a few months. It also has a ton of useful information on the subject. Lactobacillus does ...


2

Check out BYO's article great article on the difference between making your beer sour during the boil or making it sour during fermentation. In researching a Flanders Red, I found an article from Raj Apt, How to Make Sour Beer. The BJCP Style 17 also has good reference data. IMHO, most of the really tasty sour beers are getting the sour profile during ...


2

Do you ever notice a little layer of film in the neck of your bottles from the bad batches? That's a "pelicle" and is a sign of Brettanomyces/Pediococus/Lactobasilus activity. For what it's worth, I am leaning towards the theory that you had a contamination in your bottling line, probably in the spigot of the bottling bucket. I've looked in some of those ...


2

A bit of oxidation is usually part of an Old Ale.


2

I used to mash-in my berliner at 150 F, and then just let it cool down to 120 F or so. From there my souring process was pretty much identical to yours. But, I usually pitched straight L delbruckii, with a followup pitch of WLP630 or some other ale yeast(s). With multiple organisms at work, there's more potential for attenuation, and I would always see the ...


2

An unorthodox (by today's standards) way to deal with it is the really old school way of using mustard seed. When beer turns ropy without being sour, it is easily restored by mixing in the proportion of one spoonful of mustard to every fourteen gallons, in a little of the beer, and pouring it into the bung-hole. In the course of the next day ...


2

There are a couple things you can try adding to a glass of the beer. The sodium and chloride in salt will aid in the perception of sweetness, so you could try adding a bit to a glass. Too much, though, will obviously give you a salty flavor. You can also add calcium chloride to the glass to enhance the perception if maltiness and sweetness. Again, start ...


2

Brett has very low flocculation, so unlike a Sacc. starter, where you can only pitch the concentrated sediment of flocculated yeast, with Brett you'll need to pitch the "bottom half" of the starter volume to make sure you get most of the yeast. While you could just pitch the whole volume, since brett needs larger, lager-sized starters, you want to decant at ...


2

I don't see why this won't work, though it's unconventional. I probably would just let the carbonation off-gas naturally. You might also want to hold off on the fruit until nearer the end of the souring/aging, although if you add it at this point it will provide some more sugars for the bugs. Maltodextrin could be added as well for more sugars. Don't forget ...


2

You can certainly pitch the Brett later. As mentioned the Brett will help with diacetyl, but it also helps with the ropey dextrinous 'gunk' that Pedi starts to throw in there. Without Brett that stuff doesn't clear out very easily. You need Brett to break that stuff down.


2

I can think of two reasons why your mead is sour: Pomegranate juice is sour, with a pH of around 3.0. Assuming you've made 1 gallon batch, 16oz of pomegranate juice is enough to be noticeably tart. 16 oz of a pH 3.0 liquid diluted to 1 gallon yields a pH of around 3.9 which, without any sugar to balance the acid, would taste quite sour. Your mead was ...


2

Addressing your homefermentative comment, how do you know this Yakult pitch is a single strain of microbes? It could have some other strains to a smaller % and they are giving you your off smell. There isn't much regulation in the purity of yogurt cultures. Its more of a what is the largest population pitched to make the product. It doesn't mean there ...


1

Driftwood, here in Victoria, brews Bird of Prey and Lustrum as seasonal release, both sour ales. If you're in Vancouver, you might be able to find a bottle or two at a specialty private liquor store.



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