Hot answers tagged

28

This is a summary of answers so far. I'll try to keep it updated. Here are the answers. Below, you'll find who likes them, links, and other relevant data. BeerSmith BeerTools Pro Beer Calculus ProMash BrewPal BrewTarget BeerAlchemy Brewer's Friend BeerSmith beersmith.com $27.95 • Free Trial • Windows Who uses it topfermented frostywalrus Tim ...


7

Most calculations I do by hand & keep my recipes in a log book. Yet to see how well that scales. For IBU calculations I use Beer Calculus. http://beercalculus.hopville.com/recipe


6

BeerSmith is an excellent brewing software. It offers easy to understand recipe creation and a brewday instruction sheet. It also allows for different equipment setups. Recipes generally follow style guidelines.


5

I just started using Brewer's Friend. (I was previously using BeerSmith and BrewTarget.) I like that the software web-based, so I can reference it at homebrew club meetings or brew sessions at a friend's house. Features: Recipe calculator including expected OG and FG, IBUs, SRM color, and other common measures of a beer. (This includes multiple formulas/...


5

Take a look at BrewBlogger. According to developer: BrewBlogger is a web-based alternative to software such as BeerSmith, ProMash, and others. I'm busy giving BrewBlogger a try now and I'm pretty impressed. In the commercial space, BeerSmith is quite popular as is ProMash. There are quite a few available in the open source space but the only ...


5

I use BeerSmith. It has a ton of handy tools (including a recipe scaling feature, PJ). There's a trial version if you want to try it out.


5

BeerCalculus is really nice to put your recipes together. Since it's a web app, it's platform agnostic. I don't believe it does anything like inventory management. I've used BeerSmith in the past, and it's really nice and worth the money if you need inventory management.


5

Beersmith currently allows for late addition of extract. And it allows you to enter the time at which you are entering it. Promash is popular, but worthless when it comes to updates. Beersmith is supposed to be coming out with an update later in the summer, just something to keep in mind if you chose to buy a copy.


5

"... so far above an efficiency that BeerSmith is aware of" I'm not exactly sure what you mean by this, I'm positive BeerSmith is aware of efficiencies above 73%. It's very common to get higher efficiency on low-alcohol beers with smaller mashes since you're running proportionally more sparge water through each unit of volume of the mash bed, giving ...


4

I use BeerAlchemy (Mac/iPhone only), and it does pretty much anything I need, including keeping track of inventory. The iPhone version is really neat, and syncs to the Mac-version. The only thing I miss is listing batches by date, I use a spreadsheet on Google Docs for that.


4

Beersmith here. It does everything I need. The brewday instruction sheet you can print out is nice too. Makes it easier to not forget steps/ingredients. They all seem to have a bit of a learning curve. You can download a free trial of Beertools, Beersmith and Promash. So try them all and see which one you like best. Like Steph said, Beersmith has ...


4

I can't say enough about BrewPal! iPhone app (which is great because I don't brew in front of my computer). Only $0.99! Built in mash (fly, batch, decoction, partial, or steep) and boil timers (so I can enjoy as many homebrews as I want and not forget to add the 15 min hops, irish moss, or wort chiller...). I'm a developer and was going to write my own ...


4

I use Brewtarget, which has a scale feature, which works up or down. I use to scale down 5 gal batches down to 1 gal. It is also open source(free), and works on linux or Windows.....I have both and use drop box to sync the databases.


3

I user BrewersHub - http://brewershub.com. It's free, easy to use, and has a ton of calculators.


3

Well i use beersmith 2, you can enter several batches and the calendar tool is nice. I will give a calendar view with each step marked for all the batches you have going. Heres what it looks like: Also iBrewMaster for the ipad/iphone does a very nice job with your batch schedule, i like that it will give you notifications when you have to bottle or keg, or ...


3

Most of them of them do! Certainly BeerSmith and iBrewmaster have timer functions built in. BeerTools does not, I believe.


3

I think that the issue is how both are calculated. http://www.brewersfriend.com/brewhouse-efficiency/ is not accounting for losses in your equipment while beersmith is accounting for losses. I think if you took out the losses in beersmith, you would get the same efficiency as brewersfriend.


2

I have used BeerTools Pro quite successfully on Windows. They have a free web-based version on their site as well, but it limits the number of ingredients you can add and lacks the mash schedule calculator which I used quite a lot. I stopped using it so much when I moved from a Windows laptop to an Ubuntu laptop and found that BeerTools doesn't run under ...


2

If you have an iPhone, there's a $1 app called Brew Pal. It works great for sparge calculations (strike temp and volume), grain bill, hop schedule. You can even calculate the efficiency of your brew system. You can also email the recipe to yourself after you've entered it all into the app. Its great, and portable. -Bryan


2

I found an iPhone/iPod Touch app called Brew Pal that has been really great. It is very convenient to be able to carry in my pocket and also take with me if I am brewing at a friends house. The timers and calculators have been very helpful to me.


2

I have been using Qbrew. Works for me and it's free. http://www.usermode.org/code.html


2

I am a co-founder of Brewgr.com, so I am biased, but with a continually growing user base and recipe list, I feel it should be listed here as well. I feel Brewgr is a good option for brewers because it focuses on simplicity and provides a clean interface. Also, Brewgr is now open source software, so if you're a developer and want to make it better, you ...


2

"Beer Calculus" is great. http://beercalculus.hopville.com/recipe This calculator has an EXTENSIVE selection of malt/fermentation (preloaded OG/FG and color based on sugars), hops (with typical AA %), yeast strains (ale/lager, dry/liquid, and flocculation level), and boils/primary/secondary add-ins (lots of them!). Great calculator where you can select ...


2

Measuring the water in your boil is completely based on the vessel itself. The marked stick works great, sight-tubes are wonderful, etc. You can determine your actual pre and post boil volumes as you said, by simply going with 50% volumes. The end water in the fermenter will be the weighted average temperature of the water added. i.e. If you have 2.5 ...


2

Northern Brewer has a brewing calender setup on google calenders with brewing time frame suggestions for nearly every variety of beer it looks like. http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing-calendar/ The "+Google Calender" link on the lower right portion of the calender will allow you to sync this with your existing Google calender account. You could sync ...


1

I have never seen what you are talking about before. Its a shame because I have heard several people ask for it. You might be able to seach the BeerTools recipe database for a single ingredient, but I don't remember. Here are some links to popular online recipe generating calculators. Although none of them are "reverse" calulators. Good luck. My only ...


1

Seems I was using Pro Mash at the very beginning with what was then a then a brand spankin new 286 computer... I vaguely remember that it worked well but was not that intuitive. I believe that was around version 1.2. So for most of you, that was like back in the stone age.... For many years I did all the calculations by hand. It wasn't until I started ...


1

I used a few of the online systems (Hopville, then BrewToad, etc.) until I got tired of the interfaces - I thought they were cumbersome and inefficient, and I had no idea how they were doing their calculations. So I created my own Excel document, with numerous tabs, that I use for several things - recipe development, stock on hand (hops in storage, etc.), ...


1

I use a Mac and have used the free (though no longer supported) Homebrew Formulator for a few years. It's simple, straightforward and easy to use. I've played around with both BeerAlchemy and BeerTools Pro but neither one really grabbed me, much less enough to spend money on the paid version when I'm already pretty comfortable with HBF.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible