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6

I made a smoked porter about two months ago, and it turned out great. I used charcoal and applewood in my cylindrical smoker (they run about $40 at Lowe's). My LHBS advised that I should smoke the base malt before milling, but since I didn't have a mill I ended up milling first and then smoking. I placed a few pounds at a time on the top rack of the smoker ...


4

Italy's Birra del Borgo do a range of beers that are made with tobacco. I don't know how they do it, but I have had the KeTo RePorter and the KeTo ReAle and can say that they genuinely taste like they have tobacco in them. The KeTo ReAle left my mouth feeling like I'd had a cigar... You could always drop them an email and ask how they use the leaves. ...


3

Both Weyermann and Briess make some smoked malts. You could simply add these as specialty malts in your extract process with steeping if you keep the percentage to <5% of the total amount of extract. You can get either one of these from several on line suppliers here is a couple links at Northern Brewer: Wyermann Smoked Malt Briess Cherrywood Smoked ...


3

I can't speak to smoked malt vs. liquid smoke. But to answer your other question, there are big flavor differences between the types of wood you use, at least in cooking, so I would think it depends on the characteristics you want to impart in your beer. Here's a list I reference for the flavor profiles of different smokes (with a few I've added myself): ...


3

You could buy leaf-tobacco in bulk and home-smoke some grain with tobacco smoke. Nicotine's LD50 is pretty low, though. I would try to find combinations of ingredients to closely mimic the flavor, rather than using actual tobacco.


2

In addition to the pre-smoked malts you can purchase, you can smoke any kind of malt on your own, which gives you a lot more options to work with. I would suggest smoking malt a week or two before using it, however--throw it in a paper bag after smoking it to allow some of the harsher aromatics to escape (just like you would if you toast your own malt). ...


2

There are 2 ways to go with smoked malt. Rauch malt is smoked (usually with beechwood) and has a relatively mild smokiness. You can use up to 100% of it for your grist if you want an intense smokiness. Peated malt, OTOH, is smoked with peat (DUH!) and is quite intense. A couple oz. of it in a batch can give an overwhelming smokiness to your beer.


2

Purism aside about whether peated malt belongs in an Ale, I used peated malt in a Scottish Ale - just 0.7% of the grist. While I can't say I noticed a specific smokiness, there was a lot more going on in the beer ingredients-wise, but it did lift the ale and add complexity. I was very happy with the result. So, I'd go for 1%. Best to add too little and ...


2

I'm wondering if you went to a local cigar store and bought some of the empty wooden boxes, then used them like oak chips, if you would get some of the aroma transfer without the nicotine. My local cigar lounge sells these pretty cheap, but most of them are cedar and don't exactly smell just like the cigar smoke (just checked a couple that I use to store my ...


1

I actually began to write up an answer to this question back when it was first asked, but I scrapped it because I didn't want to sound like an idiot. Now that I can confirm what happened, I feel more comfortable answering. I pulled Stone's Smoked Porter recipe from their book, and brewed it a couple of months back. It calls for ~3-4% peated malt. Me ...


1

I've never used liquid smoke before. Having said that, I think this calls for an experiment! For your first question (detecting difference in complexity between liquid smoke vs. smoked malt), try it! Make both, try them, and let me know :) As an aside, when does one normally add liquid smoke? As for your second question, about "better", that's a question ...


1

A quick way, though definitely not traditional (that would include boiling with hot rocks anyway) would be to simply add dark toast oak cubes or chips to the secondary. Now, this might be cheating but its quick and easy. I made a smoked bourbon porter and used 2oz med toast oak cubes for about a week in the secondary. The resulting beer was quite smokey ...



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