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6

I converted my plastic fermenter into a mash tun/fermenter a few months ago and it works really well. Here are some pics showing how I did it: http://picasaweb.google.com/halite1977/MashTunFermenter?authkey=Gv1sRgCOW-2ufb-fT7rwE# In terms of heat loss, the heat loss from the water test earlier is a bit misleading because the water will lose temperature a ...


5

Taylor's partial boil answer is a good one, particularly if you are limited to the typical small-sized electric stove found in most apartments. Another issue with boiling wort in an apartment is excessive humidity, and more problematic, the smell drifting into your neighbor's loft. But if you want to do a full boil, there is an alternative: go outside! ...


5

I go back and forth between a 10 gallon rectangular cooler with a bazooka screen and a 5 gallon cylindrical Igloo cooler with a false bottom. The igloo is the way to go if your kitchen is really tiny, in my opinion, as it has a much smaller footprint. I've also heard of people mashing in a pot and putting it in the oven to maintain temperature. Never tried ...


5

Yeah you can scale it down as much as you want . Stove top brews are very easy to manage. The only thing to keep in mind is your efficiency, on a stove top and with a smaller amount of water it can be difficult to perfectly manage your mash temp, because smaller volumes respond more quickly to heat. But with a good thermometer with an alarm (10$ digital meat ...


4

I bought a couple of rubbermaid bins. Organized my gear into a pre-boil box, a post-boil box, and a cleaning box. I kept my glass fermentors in cardboard when not in use.


4

Seems reasonable. I usually clean out my mash tun while I'm waiting for the wort to boil, so you would lose some time. All-grain brewing is already more time-intensive than extract. Instead I suggest you do a little research into the brew-in-a-bag technique. The method is nearly the same as your combo-tun-kettle, except the grain is in an easy-to-remove ...


3

Getting a kettle that can fit over two burners on your stove is a good idea if you want to do full boils. For example, the 10 gal megapot is 17" in diameter. Additionally you can buy or build a heat stick to supplement your stove burners. I have been using an inexpensive bucket heater and a lot other homebrewers use this also, though it has not been tested ...


3

It should be fairly easy to determine the actual temperatures your fridge stays at. Fill a bucket with water & put a thermometer in it. It doesn't have to be five gallons, two or three will do. The more water, the longer you must wait during step 3. Turn the fridge to the warmest setting and put the bucket in it. Allow the temperature to stabilize – ...


3

When I apartment brewed, I simply cleared out a corner closet for the fermenter. When it was warm out I would wrap a towel around the fermenter put a few reusable icepacks around it and wrap it again. This helped keep the closet cool. I looked for a closet that was furtherst away from any heat source. If you have forced air heating and cooling you can ...


3

I live in a very small house. I use a closet in the guest room for fermenting. I put my fermenter into a large plastic bucket full of water. The added mass of the water buffers thermal swings to keep the tempos more constant. I put an aquarium heater in the bucket of water when I need to warm it up. I put ice packs in the water to cool it down. Very ...


3

A plate chiller or an ice bath are the best options. The plate chiller is FAST, and super small. Easy to store it on a bookshelf or something. You do need to have a hose hookup on the sink to make this work. Ice melts. Pretty good for saving space. It just takes a lot longer. An immersion chiller takes up a bit more room, and can get messy. Definitely ...


3

I live in a loft. There is zero storage. The only real storage I have is underneath my stairs because I cut a hole in the wall. The space is the size of a large closet. I save boxes from beer to store my empty bottles in, and stack them all under the narrow end of the area where the stairs get closest to the floor. I also bought 2 book shelves from ikea just ...


3

I operate my home-brewery in a 700 sq ft apartment with a kitchen that's nearly 15' long but only 2.5' (4-6' without appliances) - apparently, there were only skinny people when the place was built in the 1890's. Needless to say, my space is painfully small. Consequently, none of my equipment is stored in my kitchen. It is all organized into a large ...


3

Keep it proportional. I haven't discovered a perfect ratio for pounds of steeping grains to steeping water volume, but I have learned to be wary of using more than a few pounds in just a couple gallon steep. Previously, I used a grain bag with 2-5 lbs of specialty grains, depending on the recipe, in a 8 qt steep. Recently, though, I've started adding the ...


2

This is an old thread, but I cannot believe no one answered to use the Brew in a Bag method which means you mash in your boil kettle. No extra vessel needed. You line your boil kettle with a mesh bag and when the mash is complete you remove the bag and all the grain. This is how I brew every time now, and I don't have to store the mash tun any more.


2

I live in a 600 sq-ft. apartment with my girlfriend and our stuff. When not in use, I keep my 2 carboys beside the couch and against the wall in their original boxes. They are covered with a sheet, and double as a ghetto end table. I put all the tiny items, airlock, thermometer, hydrometer, iodophor, BLC, stoppers, into the brew pot to minimize how much ...


2

I have a 750 sq. ft. loft which has no storage aside from a bedroom closet. I got two commercial shelving units from Home Depot, and a leaning bike rack from Target. The bike rack holds my bike and my girlfriend's bike. The shelving units are enough to hold my two five gallon carboys, primary fermenting bucket, brew pot, a ton of empty beer bottles, ...


2

One thing is to remove the spigots on ale pails. They stack much better that way.


2

A boilover is an even greater disaster in a small space situation. A few glass marbles dropped into the brew pot prevents most boilovers. Don't worry, the marbles can take a lot more heat that your stove can put out.


2

partial boils oversized kettle tend to the temperature At most, I do partial mashes in my apartment's tiny kitchen. Steeping grains in 2-3 gallons in a 6 gallon kettle helps me avoid boilovers. My problem has been with regulating the boil's temperature. With such a small volume, it is prone to rapid changes in temperature. So, I have to check in every ...


2

I am not entirely sure what this question is asking. are you looking for how one packages beer, or how one stores the packages of beer. I am going to try and answer both. I am very fortunate to have an understand fiance that doesn't mind beer stuff strewn about but I'm sure I'm the exception and not the rule. I typically do a mix of bottles and kegs ...


2

I'm lumping bottle-conditioning in with cellaring. I live in New York and so space is at a premium, but what I'm most concerned about is explosions in the bottle-conditioning process. This is an imperfect solution, but I went with jumbo boxes from the Container Store. Pros: Stackable They each hold about a batch worth of bottles They're waterproof, with ...


2

I too bottle the beer and keep it in beer crates. In that way all the bottles stay standing the right way up and they take less space than the would if i kept them without the crates. Of course i have them in a small storage room we have where the temperature is 60-70ºF (16-21ºC). Though the bottles are mostly brown, so the beer doesn't skunk easily, and in ...


2

I started off brewing in a dorm room. If you bottle in 12 oz bottles it is more work, but they'll fit under a bed (or at least the one we had). You can easily fit batches of beer under there. Another good option is the bottom of the closet and stack things on top. For both, I like to keep them in the 24 bottle boxes you purchase new ones from.


2

The short answer is Yes. The long answer is... I have a 15 gallon polarware kettle w/false bottom and a 10 gallon of the same. I've found that I need the 15g for both mashing and boiling of 10 gallon batches-- need the extra headspace for the mash and potential boil overs in the boil. So I mash in the 15, then sparge into the 10 with an extra stainless pot ...


2

Look into brew in a bag. You use your kettle for your mash tun. It sounds like you're nearly there since you already use a bag.


1

I have a section of my pantry that I use to ferment, once fermentation is complete I rack to corny kegs and store them under an end-table. About 8 kegs can fit under the end table, with two other kegs in my kegerator. I seem to be brewing more than I can drink, so I'm probably going to have to clean out a closet in the near future. I have one closet with 6 ...


1

Generic brand Nylon Fine mesh - the finer the better 20 inches deep by 18 inches wide This bag holds at least eight pounds of grain. I BIAB as my pilot system, making 1-3 gallon batches on my stove. A friend of mine thinks any fine nylon mesh will work. You could make one from materials found in an arts & craft store like Michael's or Beverly's ...



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