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10

In short, it depends. The April 10th, 2008 episode of Basic Brewing Radio is all about glass and skunking. How Fast? Unprotected beer will rapidly skunk. I had a keg of blonde ale in the sun one summer afternoon. The beer in the three feet of tubing spoiled in less than a minute. The small volume of skunky beer was strong enough to ruin an entire pint. ...


8

For skunked beer, we're worried about Violet and UV light. There's a lot of information available on this, so I won't go into that science. Basically, we want to limit as much light less than 500nm as possible and all light under 400nm (UV) if possible. Halogen bulbs follow a similar pattern to incandescent bulbs (ref). This chart compares different bulbs, ...


6

Protecting the beer while fermenting is a good idea. In theory, the "danger" time would begin as soon as you have created some isomerized hop acids in the boil. As those are the compounds that skunk. That being said, skunking is a time dependent process. So your beer can take a hit of light during racking and bottling and probably be unnoticeable. I ...


5

According to this HomeBrewTalk wiki article on MBT and this Khymos article on "lightstruck flavor", skunking occurs when isohumulone reacts with riboflavin and ultraviolet light to create MBT. The HBT wiki article suggests riboflavin is present in wort, but it is also created by yeast; the amounts in wort and beer are unknown to me. I'd guess that ...


5

I have used swing tops in the past without issue. If you are worried about the seal you can buy replacement seals, which should probably be done every once in a while. I don't think it's necessary every time. I have bottled 2 batches using some Fischer bottles and had zero problems with the seal. As far as the green bottles go. If you keep it out of the ...


5

Yes, the wavelengths generated by a standard incandescent fit within those that are known to "skunk" beer, a process that is a photochemical reaction that causes specific chemical bonds to change, resulting in flavenoids (flavors) that are generally distasteful. They emit about one third to one half of the intensity of sunlight in the <500 nm range that ...


4

I agree with the comments in Jack Smiths post, however, I'll offer this answer to the Original Posters question. If you have the "racking from" and the "racking to" vessels protected from light during the racking process, the short time the beer spends flowing through the tubing should produce a miniscule amount of skunk and be undetectable. The amount of ...


4

http://beeradvocate.com/articles/527 Skunking is described in this article as UV radiation caused breakdown of "hop derived molecules, called isohumulones", which then bond with sulfur, giving you a skunk-like smell. As other articles have said over and over, keep your beer cool and dark. You should have a safe, cool, dark storage place for your beer to ...


4

MBT (more often referred to as skunking or light-struck) is an off-putting flavor and aroma characteristic that is intuitively named after the animal which is well known for dispensing what is considered to be the Satan's post-apocalyptic butthole of all off-flavors. The chemical composition and odor of MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) is very similar to ...


3

Cover the carboys in a blanket for no light exposure.


3

Your beer will be fine for a few hours in the kitchen. Skunking is caused by the ultraviolet radiation which provides energy for reactions involving the isomerized hop acids and sulphur compounds in the beer. While there is a small amount of UV radiation emitted by fluorescent bulbs, it's much less than sunlight - 8 hours under a fluorescent bulb is about ...


3

If it's not direct sunlight, the reaction that produces skunking will take longer, but you're not completely safe. You should probably take steps to limit the amount of light as much as possible in that situation. Maybe throw a towel over it as it sits.


3

The smell is hard to describe, especially to someone who grew up where there are no skunks. It is not really useful for me to tell you it smells like skunk musk. I have heard some of those people describe it as the smell of burnt rubber, body odor combined with burnt popcorn, sour coffee, or certain strains of aromatic marijuana. You really have to try it ...


3

I suspect no. Aged hops, with very low alpha potential, are used in lambic brewing specifically for their preservative qualities not their bittering properties. Therefore, if the low alpha isn't important it doesn't matter if they are skunked or not to be preservative.


2

See the answer to this question.


2

MBT (3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol) happens real quick. People have reported Heineken bottles skunking when in direct sunlight in less than 15 minutes. Heineken has a minor defense of green tinted bottles, clear obviously has less. An hour in an ice bucket outside would most certainly skunk any beer in a green or clear bottle. Since MBT is caused primarily ...


1

I store my bottles in the closet, and then move them to the fridge when I'm ready to chill them for drinking. I salvaged several green Becks bottles that I use for bottling, and of course, I've never had any issues. I do feel weird when I get stuck bottling a dark beer into the green bottles, but that's obviously just a mental thing. To answer your ...


1

Things we know: Alpha acids have antibacterial (preservative) properties Humulone / Iso-humulone is the primary alpha-acid in hops (but not the only one) Iso-humulone molecules are broken down when beer is skunked So if your beer is skunked, it seems to follow that it will have lost at least some of its preservative properties. Although I figure the ...


1

In all the years I have been brewing I have brewed in a garage an on my patio in the broad daylight. I have never had a beer that was skunked. I would echo these sentiments, I have certainly tasted skunked commercial beer, however this was always due to packaging in clear bottles. At a home brew level, if you are using brown bottles and fermenting ...


1

I've bottled some of my beer in swing top bottles. I like them pretty well but they are difficult to scavenge (rare) and expensive to purchase. So if cost is your motivator buying a capper (check craigslist) and caps, and fishing bottles out of a local pub's dumpster (ask permission and wear gloves!) will probably be cheaper. I had one seal fail on me, so ...



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