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9

If the beer is being kept cool and you are using CO2 to push (which I assume you are) then it can last for months. I think the longest I've ever had a Corny keg last is three months, but that was finishing it, not spoilage. Kept refrigerated, sealed and under CO2, it should last longer than it takes you to drink it. The one thing you may want to keep ...


9

As you drink the keg, you're replacing the beer in the keg with CO2. The CO2 isn't going to stale your beer. As long as you are keeping the pressure in the keg high enough to ensure that the carbonation doesn't dissipate into the keg's head space, the beer should stay tasty for quite a long time. Unlike kegerators, hand-pump kegs replace the beer with air, ...


6

If you're using CO2 to force dispense the keg, as in a kegerator, then tapping it shouldn't really affect the life of the beer (assuming there are no leaks or whatever). The beer in the keg remains covered by a layer of pressurized CO2, which will prevent oxygen or an infection from getting in. However, a month is a long time for beer to sit in the lines, ...


6

Absolutely safe to drink, and absolutely tasty. Schramm mentions keeping some for 5 years or more. And I've heard of people making mead for their children's 21st birthday that would be as old as the kid. :) Enjoy!


4

I've used Wyeast smack packs as old as 3 1/2 years and they worked fine. Just keep it cold in the fridge til you're ready to use it. And, for your own sake, make a starter with it. See mrmalty.com for instructions. Keep the hops in their original packing in the freezer til you use them and they'll stay good for years.


3

I've kept Whirlfloc for nearly a year and it was still fine. I don't see why you couldn't keep it even longer. Although some people say you don't need it for dark beers, I disagree. Even in a very dark beer you can see it it's clear or not. I use it in every batch. I don't think it's a deal breaker if you don't use it, but based on the times I've ...


2

Wyeast says that the activator packs are good for up to 6 months after the production date. Northern Brewer guarantees the packages for up to three months after production and will replace any packs that fail to inflate. The inflation of the package is your viability test for the yeast, if it inflates you should have viable yeast. For certain strains it ...


2

You're good. I'm sure everything is still fine. You did the right thing by keeping everything cold. Before you brew, you can pop the pouch in the yeast and let it warm to room temeperature and it will swell, this will let you know that the yeast is viable. I usually pop mine and let it sit out for 24 hours or so. I personally, would brew with out any ...


2

It likely has to do with the fact that there is more yeast in bottle conditioned beer than in force carbed beer. The extra yeast scavenges oxygen and extends the shelf life of the beer.


2

I use whirlfloc in pretty much every brew apart from some wheats where the protein haze is part of the style. Shelf life is about 2 years (see below.) Even though the recipe calls for whirlfloc, you can use either whirlfloc or irish moss, both are kettle finings and contain the same active ingredient - kapa-carrageenan (Wikipedia lists other types and ...


2

Do you know what Biogon is? Great mixture of CO2 and Nitrogen. We use it in Czech Republic, but I do not know if it is available in the USA. CO2 keeps the carbonation, Nitrogen preserves it, so it is a great combination. I think it is called Mixed Gas in your country


1

As long as you pressure can it, you should be able to do what you propose.


1

I've seen a 15.5 gallon keg of beer be good over a year later. Kept in house at room temperature. Not just acceptable, but just as good as when it was kegged.



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