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6

Play around with the temperature until you find what you like. I tend to leave my fridge around +45°F (or +7°C). I've found that gives me temperature I like best across styles. Here's a general temperature guide for styles.


3

I don't think that this is going to work very well, stripping out the barrier between the freezer and the refrigerator. Any number of things could happen: You risk damaging the refrigerant lines that may pass between or go around the freezer portion, Unless you can disable the freezer, you may find it working extra hard to try and maintain the thermostat ...


3

The cooling effectiveness of the coil is a function of several things: Contact surface area Contact time The difference in temperature between the warm beer and cool water. The MoreBeer Draft Box has 50 feet of 3/8" tubing, providing about 700 square inches of contact surface versus your proposed 69 square inches. So I would say you need to run the beer ...


2

Not only can you dispense at different pressures, you can carbonate beers independently of your dispense pressure. With a T off of one regulator you can gave your normal serving pressure, then you can use the other side for high pressure quick carbing if necessary on occasion. If I had the funds I'd go with a dual stage set up just for the flexibility. ...


2

In my opinion, if you're going to go the distance and convert a fridge, you should do it right and get the dual regulator setup so you can dispense at different pressures. That is, if cost isn't an issue. Well, cost would certainly be an issue for me, and I'm still debating whether or not I should do this, or even bother with converting a fridge at ...


2

Ball valves should work fine. However consider: Turbulence causes CO2 to come out of solution. Faucets are designed to minimize this effect whereas ball valves may not. Ball valves will be difficult to clean and can harbour spoilage organisms. Faucets have fewer places for such to hide and are easily disassembled. That being said, give it a shot and ...


1

Beer has a relatively low pH, usually around 3-4. As it's acidic, it can be more reactive with certain materials. Chrome-finished faucets, in particular, will over time have the chrome finish stripped off. As well, faucets need to be cleaned regularly, so the ability of the material to stand up to chemical and/or mechanical cleaning is important.


1

Standard plastic 'cobra' or 'picnic' faucets are fairly cheap. They won't mount to the side of a jockey box but if price really is the primary issue then at least these work. You can drill a hole and pass the tubing through them. The hole can then be used for a proper faucet in the future. I think some of the other non beer related options will create ...


1

For getting an optimal pour, you're best to go with a beer faucet. For the best flow with the least amount of foam, the tap should be fully open, or it will agitate the beer causing lots of foam. Other taps may have too small an opening, causing the beer to gush out or be agitated. There's also aesthetics - the beer taps have been engineered to look good, ...


1

Original Source: BYO.com Balancing your Draft System: Advanced Brewing With: 3/16" beer lines Serving tap 2ft above the keg 5 PSI CO2 serving/dispensing pressure (high for some Homebrewers) A 2ft beer line would be a good starting place (but start longer you can always cut some off but you can't put back on). A matter of balance Calculating ...


1

I've never heard of such a thing and it's hard to believe that "sweetness" could stratify. I've never seen that happen with any beverage. So I'd say no, it's not to be expected.



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