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3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


2

About the only times I use a secondary any more are when I'm adding more fermentables (like fruit) or when I dry hop. There are interactions between they yeast and dry hops that can result in a really "flowery" quality to the beer due to an increase in geraniol. You don't have to worry about off flavors due to yeast. That's a homebrew myth carried over ...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


2

Seems like a good plan. I conduct secondary with low fermentable addition in closed lid buckets without problems. These lids are not perfectly airtight, and this imperfection is enough to let CO2 out. Preferably use oldest (least tight) lid you have. Alternative is possible, too, but it doubles the chance of contamination, and will double oxidation. I would ...


2

Artificial drinks - no Most of them contains preservatives that will kill your fermentation. And if fermentation will not be killed, sugar and water will imbalance original design of your recipe. Juices - no Juices are usually around 1.04 as far as I know, and you went with 1.06, so this will restart your fermentation and dilute the effect. Condensed ...


1

No worries...05 will perform fine without anything special. Rehydrate it for best performance and then just toss it in. I've gone to 12% ABV with it with no issues. But my question is, how do you know it's the yeast? Why isn't it a fermentability of wort issues? Tell us more about your recipe and procedure in order to help figure out what's going on.


1

Some home brewers swear by secondary fermentations. Some home brewers swear by only primary fermentation. Personally, I always rack my brews into a secondary vessel after the initial vigorous fermentation is done. At that point, most of the yeast and proteins have coagulated and sunken to the bottom of the carboy. Sometimes there is a nice layer of krausen ...


1

I usually keep in primary 1-2 weeks, depending on the strength, then even if using a plastic secondary will usually rack it in for a couple of weeks just help it clear out a bit more, then bottle. The time in the bottle being potentially months, will do far more for mellowing out and blending flavours, than a couple of weeks here or there in the secondary. ...



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