Hot answers tagged

3

I wouldn't say it is a consensus, although it is not required all the time, there are cases where racking is usefull for beer as well: What's the point of secondary fermentation? A big difference between the process of making beer and wine is the time that the must/wort sits in the container (bucket/carboy/demi-john). Because wine will need more time ...


2

Seems like a good plan. I conduct secondary with low fermentable addition in closed lid buckets without problems. These lids are not perfectly airtight, and this imperfection is enough to let CO2 out. Preferably use oldest (least tight) lid you have. Alternative is possible, too, but it doubles the chance of contamination, and will double oxidation. I would ...


2

Artificial drinks - no Most of them contains preservatives that will kill your fermentation. And if fermentation will not be killed, sugar and water will imbalance original design of your recipe. Juices - no Juices are usually around 1.04 as far as I know, and you went with 1.06, so this will restart your fermentation and dilute the effect. Condensed ...


2

About the only times I use a secondary any more are when I'm adding more fermentables (like fruit) or when I dry hop. There are interactions between they yeast and dry hops that can result in a really "flowery" quality to the beer due to an increase in geraniol. You don't have to worry about off flavors due to yeast. That's a homebrew myth carried over ...


2

When I think of "raking to a secondary" I can think of two reasons you would want to do this. #1-Clarity; racking gives the beverage more time for sediment to settle out. #2-Aging; depending on the beverage racking give it more time to age.


1

How did this go? I brewed a coconut IPA and used loose toasted coconut. The worst idea ever for beer. I had to siphon out the beer through two vessels and use a screen to clear the big bits. Next time, I will put the toasted coconut in a mesh bag. What a mess it was. Plus, I lost nearly 1/5 volume from all the liquid absorbed by the coconut.


1

Don't wash with wort, you won't get the chance. It will take off before what you want to extract settles. Just rack on top the cake and use it for what it is. As long as you practice good sanitation to the fermentor while racking the old beer out and the new in you can keep it longer. Use a sanitary siphon style cane, or wrap the cane and access port with ...


1

It's probably as safe as anything in a sanitary environment, though if I'm understanding you correctly it means another, however small, potential window of exposure to dangerous microbes since you're racking twice. I've reused yeast a few times to no ill effect, but a lot of literature advises against doing it more than that. It also sounds like more work ...


1

For your secondary you will need something that seals airtight or at least with an air lock, a sealed plastic bucket would be OK, I have used them before, but don't use for too long. A loose fitting lid is not suitable. Also, the thin plastic brew buckets you tend to get for home brewing are permeable to O2 so left for too long you would get oxidation of the ...


1

My routine is to dry hop in that primary towards the end of fermentation. At fermentation temperatures. Then I rack to a keg (or a secondary in your case) to add my gelatin. But there is no "aging". Its an IPA. I want it to go from fermenation to dry hop to serving as quickly as I can.


1

For taste and aroma, 4 to 7 days of dry hopping are optimal. For clarity I prefer to give isinglass 7 to 14 days. Probably it's the same with gelatin, these are similar. Thus, I obviously add gelatin first, hops second. One more thing. If you want to rack to secondary, strongly consider adding gelatin after racking. I guess you will be using another bucket ...


1

In my experience grassy notes come through when hopping at cold temps. I've tried to salvage some old IPAs with a cold dry hop and filtering with little success when they are at or below 55° while it kinda works, they have always gotten a grassy note flagged by at least one judge. For a lager the last real effective time for a dry hop is during your ...


1

I would simply dry hop before I started the lagering process. Do it in the bucket you are in with a sanitized sack. Then you can pull the sack and proceed with your lager phase. There might be some hop debris that makes it through the sack but it shouldn't be noticeable or a problem.


1

No worries...05 will perform fine without anything special. Rehydrate it for best performance and then just toss it in. I've gone to 12% ABV with it with no issues. But my question is, how do you know it's the yeast? Why isn't it a fermentability of wort issues? Tell us more about your recipe and procedure in order to help figure out what's going on.


1

Some home brewers swear by secondary fermentations. Some home brewers swear by only primary fermentation. Personally, I always rack my brews into a secondary vessel after the initial vigorous fermentation is done. At that point, most of the yeast and proteins have coagulated and sunken to the bottom of the carboy. Sometimes there is a nice layer of krausen ...


1

I usually keep in primary 1-2 weeks, depending on the strength, then even if using a plastic secondary will usually rack it in for a couple of weeks just help it clear out a bit more, then bottle. The time in the bottle being potentially months, will do far more for mellowing out and blending flavours, than a couple of weeks here or there in the secondary. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible