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Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...


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You can get clear beer without secondary, including IPAs with dry-hopping. Secondary can improve your beer clarity, but it doesn't necessarily improve clarity. Some people say that the hops can interact with the yeast in the primary and produce unpleasant flavors, although I've never experienced this. You will find tons and tons of threads telling you to dry ...


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The beer will clear with a secondary. The trub will precipitate within a week. I have found that the best route to clear beer is to get a strong boil, strong hot break, and strong cool break. This will create larger protein strands that will coagulate and precipitate in the brew kettle. If you plan to use gelatin in the future I would suggest adding it to ...


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Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral ...


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The primary function of secondary fermentation is clarification, not fermentation. (Unless you're fermenting something which requires a secondary fermentation addition, like a special yeast addition or dry hopping.) I've found great success by making sure the fermenting wort gravity is within 2-4 points of expected final gravity before transfer to secondary. ...


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No, you will be fine. This question has been answered before here and here. On a personal note, I just bottled a batch last night that sat in the primary fermenter for six weeks, and it tasted very good. Incidentally, racking to a secondary vessel introduces a very small risk of oxidation or infection, and is unnecessary work unless (a) you plan to ...


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Assuming that the secondary fermenter has been sitting still throughout the conditioning weeks, all of your augments should have settled to the bottom. Some stuff floats at the top, even when they've been wet for weeks, but most things sink. To setup for bottling, bring your bottling bucket to the secondary fermenter without moving the fermenter or ...


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Nylon bag: Put everything into a thin-mesh "hop bag" -- for example the "feet" part of pantyhose can work well (preferably obtained new). But a bag may be difficult to insert into (and remove from) a glass carboy. The PET plastic carboys, however, have bigger openings and can accommodate the bag better, depending on how many ingredients you have in the bag. ...


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First, I would not necessarily draw any conclusions from a sample of unfermented wort or unconditioned beer. The "green" beer rarely has the same taste, complexity, etc. I get after patiently letting the beer condition. Some flavors are metabolized by the yeast or otherwise go away during conditioning, while other flavors are able to then come out (or ...



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