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4

Likely late in the game now, but you can also put oak chips on a sanitized cooking sheet at 200F or so and leave in the oven for 15 minutes or so. This will sanitize the chips, and subtly brings out some of the flavour, but not too much tannic or other astringent flavours. Essentially you are pasteurizing the oak chips by heating them to 138F (min), before ...


4

Oxidization happens when there is oxygen dissolved in the beer, such when the beer is splashed or agitated in air. I've always been careful with racking, using either a regular siphon started by blowing into the carboy (through a sanitary air filter) or via an autosiphon. About 2 years ago, I had oxidization problems in a few batches which appeared after ...


4

By being safe and deliberate with your racking methods, I doubt you'll have much of a problem. I believe a fair amount of the problems stem from lack of improper methods of racking (among other things). Some of the things that cause oxidation include: Not getting the siphon tube to sit in the bottom of carboy/bucket/keg while transferring Getting a lot ...


3

You can get clear beer without secondary, including IPAs with dry-hopping. Secondary can improve your beer clarity, but it doesn't necessarily improve clarity. Some people say that the hops can interact with the yeast in the primary and produce unpleasant flavors, although I've never experienced this. You will find tons and tons of threads telling you to dry ...


3

The beer will clear with a secondary. The trub will precipitate within a week. I have found that the best route to clear beer is to get a strong boil, strong hot break, and strong cool break. This will create larger protein strands that will coagulate and precipitate in the brew kettle. If you plan to use gelatin in the future I would suggest adding it to ...


3

After only a few days in primary, there's almost certainly enough yeast suspended in the beer to ferment the sugars in the fruit. There are a couple exceptions to this rule: Very high gravity beers. The high alcohol levels in the finished beer are toxic to yeast. Beers that have aged for many months. Most of the yeast will have precipitated ot. In ...


2

No, you will be fine. This question has been answered before here and here. On a personal note, I just bottled a batch last night that sat in the primary fermenter for six weeks, and it tasted very good. Incidentally, racking to a secondary vessel introduces a very small risk of oxidation or infection, and is unnecessary work unless (a) you plan to ...


2

Dry hopping in primary is totally fine, I do it all the time. It does the exact same thing. The main reason for secondary is getting clearer beer, but I never do secondary as it increases the chance of oxidization and infection. I get very clear beer without secondary just by cold crashing and letting it sit for a while. After kegging/bottling, just let it ...


2

Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral ...


2

The primary function of secondary fermentation is clarification, not fermentation. (Unless you're fermenting something which requires a secondary fermentation addition, like a special yeast addition or dry hopping.) I've found great success by making sure the fermenting wort gravity is within 2-4 points of expected final gravity before transfer to secondary. ...


1

First, I would not necessarily draw any conclusions from a sample of unfermented wort or unconditioned beer. The "green" beer rarely has the same taste, complexity, etc. I get after patiently letting the beer condition. Some flavors are metabolized by the yeast or otherwise go away during conditioning, while other flavors are able to then come out (or ...


1

The only way to know if it's stuck or it's finished is to do a forced fermentation test at 20°C/68°F on a small amount of the beer (say 1qt) with a fresh yeast. WLP007 is a relatively good attenuator for an English strain, with the range given as 70-80%. The upper limit is in the optimum case, and you'll typically only reach this if there is ...


1

The only way to know for certain whether or not fermentation has completed is to take gravity readings. If you notice that the gravity doesn't change after 3-4 days, and remains at a SG of 1.021, then you most likely have a stuck fermentation. Unfortunately, pitching another vial of yeast is not likely to be as effective as you may need it to be. In order ...


1

The answer depends upon the type of wine you are making. I have one bottle of French Columbard that I turned into sparkling wine due to an accidental over-addition of acid before primary fermentation. I aged all of the bottles with the lees for 2 years minimum before degorging with the sole purpose of getting the yeasty notes I have experienced with ...


1

Strange. My first thought is a cellulose-producing bacteria, such as acetobacter. This would usually come with some tartness, though. Do you notice any? If that is the case, besides vinegar taste, there should be no ill effects. That looks similar to cellulose you'd see in something like a kombucha SCOBY. My second thought is the gelatin finings you ...


1

Yes, you are correct. Without some other source of C02, the beer will lose pressure as the level drops, and it will stop coming out of the keg altogether soon. Can you post a link to the "5 gallon plastic keg with tap" in question? I can't imagine why anyone would sell a keg that can't be charged, and I've never heard of a 5gal plastic keg vessel either. I ...



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