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6

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


6

BE SURE to boil any water you add at this point to deoxygenate it. If you don't, the added water will oxidize your beer and promote faster staling.


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


4

You don't need to worry about "saving" the batch. Even if you left them in the fridge they'd still carb, just very slowly. It might take months. But there's absolutely nothing wrong with taking them out of the fridge for a couple weeks to carb, then returning them to the fridge once the process is complete.


3

The yeast will still carbonate at fridge temperatures; just very slowly. Think months instead of weeks. I presume you put the beer in the fridge as you want to start trying to drink them. My advice would be to take your beer out of the fridge, and let them warm up to room temperature (65-75 degrees), and just stick them in a closet for a a few weeks. If you ...


3

At this point you don't know if the fermentation is stuck or finished. Despite the yeast attenuation rating, it's the fermentability of the wort that determines attenuation. Alcohol tolerance is not the problem. More yeast might help or it might not. Before you do anything you should try a fast ferment test to determine if there are any more fermentable ...


3

Unless you were fermenting very cold or had a high starting gravity, I imagine fermentation was actually done after 7 days and the beer moved on to conditioning. The way to know is to measure the SG - signs such as airlock activity and kraeusen falling are not accurate ways to monitor the brew - the SG is the key here, and that will tell you when ...


3

You can dilute/blend your beer to diminish the ABV (and increase the volume). Brew Your Own magazine has a nice article on that.


3

I've done it and it works fine, although it isn't ideal. You do risk possible oxidation, but if you don't keep it there for too long you should be OK. Do you happen to have a CO2 tank to purge the 6 gal. with? Or how about using the 6 gal. for the new batch of beer and skipping secondary on the other one? Secondary is usually unnecessary.


3

Most brewers yeast has a alcohol tolerance of at least 10%, so if your beer was around or under 10% then carbonation and conditioning will continue as normal. If your beer is pushing that limit check the tolerance of the yeast you used - some yeasts have a much higher alcohol tolerance, meaning you'll still be fine.


2

Nope, there's no reason it should. I make a Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter that gets 375 ml. of bourbon added at bottling. It's strong beer even before the bourbon, and there has never been a problem carbonating it. Unless adding the liquor pushed the beer over 12+% ABV, you should have no problem.


2

I would assume mostly for convenience, since it is likely easier to rack onto fruit than dump fruit into a primary vessel. Also, people are likely combining secondary fermentation with secondary for purposes of clarity. You would leave some trub behind (which also includes yeast) but there would be plenty of yeast in suspension for the secondary ...


2

Secondary is generally not necessary. However, for an IIPA, dry hopping is crucial. Based on research done by Stan Hieronymous, I now rack to secondary before dry hopping. If you leave the beer on the yeast, there is an interaction between the hops and the yeast that increases the levels of gerianol and give it (what is to me) an unpleasant floral ...


2

No, there really isn't. I guess I have to enter more to be able to post this, but there's really nothing more to say.


1

My bet is that after only 3 days, it wasn't really finished. In combination with the addition of amylase enzyme, you're simply seeing more fermentation activity. Fermentation does not always have an obvious visual component; gravity readings over time are the only solid way of knowing. My corny kegs are marked as "good" up to 150psi. 15 psi is extremely low ...


1

The last time I had trouble with bottle conditioning, I agitated all of the bottles just a little bit. I picked up each bottle, tilted it to the horizontal, gave it a half-turn, then put it back into the box where I keep my bottles. In a few more days I had good carbonation.


1

It's unlikely that a coarse filter like a dish towel would remove all the yeast from the perry, but it could have removed enough to slow fermentation down. The other possibility is that there's lack of yeast nutrient, which would also cause slow fermentation. The first thing you should try is waiting longer. Keep the perry in a warm (~700 F.) place. Give it ...


1

Did you sanitize the kitchen cloth you use to filter? I always do the filtering when passing the wort to the primary because is easier and always with sanitized equipment. Next time try adding sugar to the whole beer (in the fermenter) instead to each bottle.


1

It would mean adding the hops at 2 weeks into your secondary; if your secondary is 4 weeks long and you want it to sit on dry-hops for 2 weeks, then add them at 2 weeks before you bottle. Incidentally, I'll note that most commercial brewers only dry hop for a handful of days, not weeks. And "secondary" is generally useless on this sort of timeframe. You ...


1

The fast ferment is a good idea. What temp did you mash at? Ending at 1.030 is pretty high. You can throw in some champagne yeast and it won't change the character much, if at all. You can also throw in white labs 090 or 099, be careful of the 099 it can ferment very low.


1

Go with the tea. You'll extract the flavor and sanitize the chamomile.


1

You will want to dry-hop at normal/fermentation temps for the best hop oil extraction. Dry-hopping cold is going to be an inefficient use of precious hops. If you're worried about (or better: experience via experiment) low bottle carbonation/refermentation, you can always pitch new yeast during bottling. Some highly-flocculant strains might be ...


1

You should have enough yeast still in solution after cold crashing before you bottle. You should not have any issues with this much time. If you were to wait a few months then I would worry. If you do cold crash in the bottle there will be some increased sediment but if you are careful when you pour no a problem If you are going to dry hop in your ...


1

I would say you have 3 tones you could go with. herbal: cardamom, nutmeg, allspice or star anise. this might be a nice little warm note over the hops. fruity: orange or lemon zest, or stone fruit(cherries, apricots, etc) or extra bitter: Wormwood if you are a masochist taste your wort to what it needs for good balance. I have a hard time making high ...


1

The only way to know if it's stuck or it's finished is to do a forced fermentation test at 20°C/68°F on a small amount of the beer (say 1qt) with a fresh yeast. WLP007 is a relatively good attenuator for an English strain, with the range given as 70-80%. The upper limit is in the optimum case, and you'll typically only reach this if there is ...


1

The only way to know for certain whether or not fermentation has completed is to take gravity readings. If you notice that the gravity doesn't change after 3-4 days, and remains at a SG of 1.021, then you most likely have a stuck fermentation. Unfortunately, pitching another vial of yeast is not likely to be as effective as you may need it to be. In order ...


1

When you add water, make sure you don't get chlorinated water like some cities provide. The yeast doesn't like the clorine and you could get problems with bottle carbonation.


1

Nope, that will be fine. I've done it several times.


1

You are not likely to have much success trying to force carb in a pressure barrel as they will generally vent before reaching a high enough pressure in order to protect the pressure barrel. They are not designed to hold pressure to the degree kegs are. After 4 weeks, unless the pressure barrel was stored too cool, you are likely to have all the carbonation ...


1

I've not used this type of equipment, but if you're sure everything is sealed then you should still be able to add more priming sugar and re-carbonate the brew. 4 weeks is a little on the long side, so the yeast may not be as viable as they were, but there will still be sufficient yeast in the beer to carbonate, but it may take a while - a couple of weeks. ...



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