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6

It is difficult to impossible to get much flavor out of watermelon due to its water content. There just isn't a of of flavor there to start with, and any sugars in the watermelon will be consumed by the yeast.


5

Like above, I've found corney kegs to be a great sealed aging container. Couple notes. I wouldn't allow any pressure in any glass carboy. Below is box from 6gal Italian glass carboy. ! PSI is pounds per square inch. Conditioning and secondary can easily make 2 bars, about 27psi. Because of the surface area a carboy would fail at a fraction of that. Plastic ...


4

Here is a good test of what you are looking to do. http://brulosophy.com/2014/08/12/primary-only-vs-transfer-to-secondary-exbeeriment-results/ Here is the conclusion of the test: Once all the data was collected and I wasn’t worried about blowing through these kegs of beer, I started serving it to people stopping by. On a few occasions, with folks who ...


4

Yeast with a high floculation rate will do this, they usually break off the bottom and float up from trapped c02. Beer looks really clear, good job. When you rack to secondary, go ahead and let the floaters suck into the secondary, usually this is enough to break them up and let them settle. If you don't mind the extra loss you can leave them behind. ...


4

Oxygen in beer has to do with shelf life. A small amount of headspace is not going to effect the beer short term. I have secondary fermented plenty of 5 gallon batches in a 6.5 gallon fermenter with great results. I personally wouldn't go through the trouble of a bag liner especially if you are going to drink the beer within a couple months.


4

You may be interested in Wood Toxicity and Allergen Chart presented at The Wood Database. With very important warning: Just because any given wood is not listed on the chart, does not mean that it is completely safe to use. It simply means that adverse reactions have not been reported as of yet. That said, there is over 200 kinds of wood in this one ...


4

I would stick to the wood chips that are available from your homebrew supplier. There is a large selection available. One may be temped to cut up an old liquor barrel or cubing a known safe species of wood. But care needs to be taken not to contaminate the wood with the cutting tool, saws have coatings and oils etc. The chips made for brewing have been ...


3

Seeing how its puree >90% of it will be accessible to the yeast. Whether it all can be fermentable is a different question due to yeast health and the types of sugar (mostly fructose likely) in the fruit/puree. As for the change in gravity its not going to be significant. 1 lb of table sugar in one gallon would be ~1.046SG 190grams is about 42% of a pound. ...


3

For the primary go with 5 gallons so you have plenty of headspace for any foaming. For the secondary, i'l split between the 3 gallon carboy and get a 1 gallon jug for the remainder. This way you can keep the headspace to a minimum, and you have extra same batch cider in hand if you need to top off for any reason. Which you will because Apple drops a TON of ...


3

The cider / vinegar smell is normal, it is acetaldehyde and is a normal byproduct of fermentation. But it's a temporary byproduct, the yeast will consume it to recover NAD+ from NADH after all oxygen has been gone for a while. If I recall correctly, even acetobacter needs oxygen to actually make vinegar. So the problem is apparently oxygen more than ...


2

There are many causes of haze in beer. Here you're assuming that the haze is from the yeast, but it may be chill haze, which takes a long time to settle out, if at all. Take a sample of the beer and warm it to room temperature. If the haze disappears then you know it was chill haze.


2

Personally I'd bottle for 2 or 3 weeks. As I like it to develop and carbonate nicely in the bottle. I would usually not leave my brews sitting in the primary so long as it rests on a lot of lees. The yeast it is sitting on will start to break down and can potentially release off flavours. Once I hit my target gravity I try to get the beer/wine into the ...


2

If you want to experiment with the difference between "primary-only" and "primary-secondary", then rack half of your batch into a new fermentor, and bottle both halves at the same time.


2

Campden tablets are usually Potassium Metabisulfite .It works by depriving organisms of oxygen, kinda like how halon puts a fire out. For yeast it means it doesn't have what it needs so it's waiting, doesn't kill it. I've made cider from juice that used Potassium Metabisulfide as a preservative, fermination would only start once the preservative was ...


2

The temperature could be a factor, make sure your bottles are stored at a correct temperature (see the yeast package for ideal temperature). It is possible that the SO2 did not evaporate as much as expected? There are kits that you can buy to measure sulfites in wine : Titrets It is also possible that the yeast in the bottles did not get enough oxygen to ...


2

I've noticed over time that you want use lots and lots of fruit (if you think you used enough, add more), supplement with extract, puree the flesh (no rinds or skins) or use juice if possible, boiling kills some flavors, and don't use clarifying agents. You can probably substitute some of your wheat extract with light LME or DME. Depends on your recipe. Ask ...


2

That depends on the question you want to answer. bottling the primary-only batch after a week but leaving bottles for the extra week to let the primary-secondary batch catch up and How does the beer taste if we bottle a week early? leaving the batch in primary for an extra week (assuming we weren't disturbing it by transferring a lot of it for ...


2

That's a very quick response - was there still a lot of yeast in suspension? Keep that fermention covered any way you can - fruit flies are going to lose their minds over this stuff. I suggest a blowoff tube going into some sanitizer.


2

That would be fine as long as the fermenter can handle some pressure. It might even improve your beer. But if you're traveling a relief valve is pretty much required (like a cornelius keg). Beer that appears to not be 'active' is still generating some CO2 - before the yeast are completely dead (which will take several months) they consume stored glycogen, ...


2

1) Go with a 5 gallon primary, this is the one you want ample head space in, secondary filling to the neck minimizes O2 exposure. O2 exposure is only an issue once you have alcohol in the cider, there are several ways to minimize this in secondary. 2) I wouldn't dilute with water, it will only lower the OG reducing the final ABV


2

For the bourbon flavor, the effect is rapid. However, for the wood, you'll want to keep that in for a few weeks. However, bourbon will likely mask much of the oak that you will extract.


2

From the picture it looks like normal yeast clumps to me. Sometimes you get dried krausen falling back in the beer and it doesn't really dissolve and settle out. Its hard to say looking at an internet picture, but that's what it looks like to me.


2

If the starter was on the stir plate it is aerated already. You will however, be introducing oxidized wort from the starter into the beer. This could be an issue for flavor later on, but it being a big beer with rich flavors it might not be noticeable.


1

Clean your primary, and put everything back in that carboy for secondary. At the risk of transfer exposure to O2, but can be done easily to avoid it. Or put an airlock on the 2 liter bottle and let it ferment separate from the rest. This would minimize transfer O2 exposure. Or leave them sealed in a 2 liter soda bottle, this will naturally carbonate them. ...


1

When you pitch a mixed blend each microbe acts on different sugars and other chemicals at different times as the environment in the wort changes to each microbes optimum environment. If you only pitch saccharomyces first then it can potentially create an environment that other microbes like Lacto and Brett can't survive in. For example Lacto doesn't work ...


1

wild stab in the dark here but I think it makes sense. I have several jars of varying chars of oak in different whiskeys and wines. I plan on pulling them out, soaking them in another jar of like beer to be brewed, and then adding to full batch. My hope is this would simulate a second (brewers) use barrel and at the very least less aggressive and could work ...


1

I have not tasted a "ten tidy" yet, but based on my experience with wine and oak chips, I would say that one week is enough to get some wood taste. After 2 weeks, I felt the oak taste was too strong for a wine. So according to that experience, I would say that after a week take a small sample to taste. Then decide if you'd like to leave it more time or ...


1

I would try to add saaz at the end of boiling (0 min) and dry hopping with more saaz 2 days before bottling. You could check hops characterists at hopunion: https://www.hopunion.com/saaz/


1

The calculators are someone's idea of what the style should be. Each brewery will do something different depending on tradition, marketing, and what they think their customers like. You are your only customer. What do you like? High carbonation, or low carbonation? I like low carbonation. I never do more than 2 volumes of CO2. For a 19L batch at room ...


1

I routinely use 150g of sucrose for 18-19 liter batches, and rarely have over carbonation. And then, only if I keep the beer in a warm place for a long time. No exploded bottles yet. That being said, you should give the yeast plenty of time to flocculate before bottling, and don't open them when warm.



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