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7

There is no reason to secondary that beer. Most homebrewers these days don't bother with secondary unless adding fruit or something else that will cause fermentation to restart. Here's what John Palmer, Jamil Zainisheff and others have to say...."Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ...


7

A good starting point for fruit additions in 1lb/gl. Strawberries are pretty subtle, though. I added 7.5lb to 5gl of blonde this summer, and the flavor was easily noticable without being overpowering.


6

Question 1 is hard to answer because its so dependent on the relative humidity and air flow of the room in question. I wouldn't assume an airlock with water would be safe for more than 4 weeks without checking on it or topping it off. Vodka is sometimes recommended as an airlock liquid, but I think its is a bad idea for long-term storage. Being roughly a ...


5

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you start with five gallons in the fermenter you won't have five gallons left to bottle, but it isn't any more concentrated than when you started. If your OG and FG ...


5

What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


4

Probably no need for a secondary vessel step with this. Depending on your fermentation temps up to this point you may not need to diacetyl rest this beer. California Lager yeast is generally fermented higher than standard lagers so the yeast may have cleaned that up by the time its done. I'd taste a sample of it to be sure. If you want to truly lager this ...


3

Give it some time. I had a stout take about a month before there was a decent head.


3

Yes. It's at a stable gravity that's a reasonable terminal gravity for that style (1.006 is a little dry for a bitter, but just a little). The krausen has fallen back into the beer, which is why there's just "a little froth" and "a small head". It's bottling time.


3

Probably not. Typically people rack to secondary once most signs of active fermentation are done in the primary fermenter. 1.022 seems too high for primary to be completely done, but it's impossible to say without knowing what the gravity was the day before and after that, how many days it's been fermenting, what the activity level is in the fermenter, ...


3

1/ No, you should not change your fermentation schedule because of a 20 minute difference in steeping grains. Steeping grains for an extract brew is mostly just extracting flavor and color, but there might be a very small difference in some sugars you get. Regardless, not enough to affect the fermentation in any way. (You should do a 2 week primary instead ...


3

Fermented beer contains somewhere around 0.8 volumes of CO₂. When you rack to secondary, you're certainly causing some (however minimal) agitation of the beer, which will cause some CO₂ to be released. You may also be changing temperature, which might cause some CO₂ to be released. And dry-hopping is going to give tons of nucleation sites for CO₂, which will ...


2

No, there really isn't. I guess I have to enter more to be able to post this, but there's really nothing more to say.


2

As noted in the comments, WYeast 3724 is well known for stalling/slowing down at around 1.035. I've used this yeast in the past, and it will eventually achieve over 80% apparent attenuation. I used a brew belt to heat the beer, and wrapped the carboy in blankets to insulate it. This brought the temperature up to the mid 80's F. It took a few weeks to finish ...


2

For the vanilla, make a tincture of extract by taking 1 to 2 onces of vodka then split and scrape the insides of the vanilla and place it int the vodka. Let it sit a week or 2 before throwing in. I like to do this on brew day then I pour the extract in the secondary after I rack. For the cinnamon sticks I boil 1 to 1.25 onces for 60 minutes. I've read this ...


2

I made a Strawberry Saison last Summer and the 1lb/per gallon was a nice subtle flavor, but I think I may raise the to 1.5 pounds next time. Also, I used frozen strawberries which I gently crushed. Let them thaw a bit at the bottom of the secondary and then racked on top of them. The beer was able to use all of the fruit this way.


1

Are we talking about lack of carbonation or a missing head here? You say it's flat which would mean there is no CO2 but it seems like there is. A beer doesn't taste flat without a head if it has CO2 in it. If your beer doesn't carbonate there is either not enough yeast or not enough sugar, what you ca do: turn the bottles up-side-down, maybe your yeast ...


1

Wait longer, they'll wake up some day. For comparison, my most recent brett beer got brett b in the primary, fermented out to 1.010 (typical for the other yeast) and then sat for two month doing nothing before the gravity dropped & flavors appeared. Ended up at 1.005. A bit of pellicle formed later, but I don't think pellicle formation tells you too ...


1

Since there is really no fermentation going on in secondary, temperature is of little concern. as log as you don't get too hot, not much else matters. In fact, there's seldom a need to do a secondary at all.


1

You wouldn't want a sudden drop in temperature, or too low (8C is way too low), the yeast might give up completely instead of helping the beer mature. 20C should be no problem, the yeast shouldn't be making any esters at this stage. It's also the preferred temperature for the early stage of bottle conditioning. This all assumes you're using a common ale ...


1

You absolutely should have an airlock on your barrel. This allows fermentation to continue (fermentation halts under enough pressure). You will want to check the taste every month at minimum to see if it's too oaky. New barrels (barrels not previously used for whiskey or wine or anything) will impart much more oak flavor into your brew, so make sure you ...


1

In order for the yeast to be of much help to you, you want the beer to stay in the primary vessel. If you are looking for the beer to clear from a visibility standpoint, you can start lowering the temp in the primary as well. Moving to a secondary to do this is largely unnecessary. But if you were really concerned you could move it off the yeast cake for ...


1

There is always plenty of yeast in suspension unless one did an extended cold store in secondary. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast. I wouldn't add more priming sugar yet. I'd make sure the keg is warm enough and give it more time. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast, but it can be finicky to dropping temps and alcohol. 5 days is a little ...


1

To save time, I top off my brew to 5 gallons just before bottling (with water that has been boiled and cooled, of course). I'll be adding the priming sugar at this stage anyway, so I just bump up the amount of water used to dissolve the priming sugar enough to top off my brew.


1

You can top up if you want, but you don't have to. Boiling the water and cooling is necessary, since boiling both sanitizes and releases dissolved oxygen, which would prematurely stale the beer.



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