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What you describe in your comments sounds like trub (pronounced "troob"). It's mostly yeast, proteins, fats, and sometimes hop material. It's totally normal for that stuff to settle to the bottom of the vessel after fermentation is complete. You don't filter it; you just let it settle and then carefully siphon the beer off while picking up as little of the ...


5

When racking from a primary fermenter to a secondary vessel, you will leave behind a non-trivial amount of "stuff" so the volume in the secondary will be less than the volume in the primary. If you start with five gallons in the fermenter you won't have five gallons left to bottle, but it isn't any more concentrated than when you started. If your OG and FG ...


1

In order for the yeast to be of much help to you, you want the beer to stay in the primary vessel. If you are looking for the beer to clear from a visibility standpoint, you can start lowering the temp in the primary as well. Moving to a secondary to do this is largely unnecessary. But if you were really concerned you could move it off the yeast cake for ...


1

There is always plenty of yeast in suspension unless one did an extended cold store in secondary. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast. I wouldn't add more priming sugar yet. I'd make sure the keg is warm enough and give it more time. Fermentis S04 is a pretty reliable yeast, but it can be finicky to dropping temps and alcohol. 5 days is a little ...


1

To save time, I top off my brew to 5 gallons just before bottling (with water that has been boiled and cooled, of course). I'll be adding the priming sugar at this stage anyway, so I just bump up the amount of water used to dissolve the priming sugar enough to top off my brew.


1

You can top up if you want, but you don't have to. Boiling the water and cooling is necessary, since boiling both sanitizes and releases dissolved oxygen, which would prematurely stale the beer.



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