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37

The term "secondary fermentation" is misleading since the purpose isn't to continue fermentation. A secondary stage can be used for any combination of things: Clarification: racking to secondary gets the beer off the yeast cake and allows more particulates to fall out of suspension. This is often the only reason I use a secondary stage; I like clear beer. ...


33

From John Palmer in the "Ask the Experts" section of the AHA forum: Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ANY ale, except when conducting an actual second fermentation, such as adding fruit or souring. Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary, and therefore the risk of oxidation ...


16

I'll simply quote part of what John Palmer said in the "Ask the Experts" section if the American Homebrewers Association website.... "The risk inherent to any beer transfer, whether it is fermenter-to-fermenter or fermenter-to-bottles, is oxidation and staling. Any oxygen exposure after fermentation will lead to staling, and the more exposure, and the ...


14

I use vanilla quite a bit to make my Bourbon Vanilla Imperial Porter and I've never sanitized the beans, nor suffered any ill effects from not sanitizing them. By the time they get into the beer in secondary, the alcohol content and low pH of the beer make it pretty resistant to infection. And remember, the best part of the vanilla bean is the "gunk" ...


10

Cover it in vodka (as little as possible), and put both the vanilla pod and the vodka into the beer.


10

Boil or sanitize a few marbles and toss them in a hop bag with the hops. Tie off and let it sink to the bottom of your secondary vessel. The marbles will keep the hops submerged. Once you've siphoned out the beer and it's time to remove the hops, the marbles will also make it easier to get the hops out, especially when using glass carboys. To make things ...


10

The debate is basically whether there is any benefit to the risk(s) caused by racking to a secondary fermenter after the primary fermentation has completed. There are many reasons people rack to a secondary fermenter. This isn't the place to discuss whether they're myths or not, but here are the reasons: Getting the beer off the trub helps it clarify ...


9

Despite your instructions moving the beer while it was at 1.020 was probably the problem. The yeast had stalled out for some reason. Perhaps under pitching or non healthy yeast to start with. Or the temp could have dropped too much and the yeast started to go dormant. Its always easier to fix stalled ferments when you are still on the primary yeast cake. ...


8

There are two things to consider when racking to secondary: Wait for primary fermentation to finish. The common rule of thumb is to wait until the gravity of the beer doesn't change over the course of three days. This will indicate that the primary fermentation has completed. However, it's helpful to leave your beer in primary a little longer, even after ...


8

Most "Chocolate" stouts get their flavor from a combination of roasted malts - chocolate malt, pale chocolate malt or coffee malt. There are delicious exceptions, like Young's Double Chocolate Stout. Nibs are dehusked, roasted cacao seeds. They are high in fat (relatively tasteless cocoa butter), which does not add much flavor and which might cause problems ...


7

More beer has a great guide on taking care of oak barrels which covers cleaning, sanitizing, etc. The overview is: keep it filled so that it doesn't dry out and use a sulfur-dioxide mixture to sanitize. The oak will soak up some of the beer over time, so brew a little extra and keep it on hand to refill as the level goes down. You should also remember that ...


7

Temp swings can cause problems, but temps as high as what you've got can cause even worse problems. Keep in mind that fermentation is an exothermic process. Therefore, you should chill your wort to below the temp you want to ferment at and then let it rise to the proper range. Don't sacrifice beer quality and flavor for a short lag time or fast ...


7

I think it's possible to leave the fruit in there for too long, but I don't think a couple of weeks or even a month will hurt. As a homebrewer and home winemaker, I have two ways to look at this issue... Technically, when you ferment fruit you are making wine. When you add fruit to your secondary, one could argue that you're adding a bit of wine to your ...


7

There is no reason to secondary that beer. Most homebrewers these days don't bother with secondary unless adding fruit or something else that will cause fermentation to restart. Here's what John Palmer, Jamil Zainisheff and others have to say...."Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ...


6

My understanding is that explosions are usually caused by the airlock getting clogged, usually by krausen. The pressure builds up and you get an explosion. The solution is to use a blow-off hose instead of an airlock, since it's wider and allows for krausen or whatever to escape. On one hand, I haven't heard of this happening in secondary, but on the ...


6

The need to rack to secondary is a somewhat controversial topic, but here's my opinion: leaving the beer on the lees, in the primary, for another three weeks will have no adverse effects on flavor. In fact, transferring to secondary introduces a small risk of infection, and offers little or no benefit and so should be discouraged.


6

BE SURE to boil any water you add at this point to deoxygenate it. If you don't, the added water will oxidize your beer and promote faster staling.


6

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


5

I was told that it helps the clarity of the beer, since the sludge from the primary will be left over in the first fermenter. I use a glass carboy for secondary fermentation. I also know of many people who bottle right after primary, as you do. If it's working for you, then it's no big deal. Try doing a secondary for a batch and see if you notice a ...


5

The biggest concern is autolysis of the yeast, which is when a yeast cell ruptures after it dies and releases off-flavors. This can take months to kick in, and may never even be an issue, but the potential is there for long conditioning. If I'm going to have a beer in a keg in <2 months, then I'll just keg it off of the primary. If I'm going to be ...


5

I use a large noodle strainer. place the stainer at the opening of the ale pail and steadily poor the wort through the stainer into the bucket. Then I just lift the stainer and throw away the trub.


5

Use Secondary Fermentation Do Not Use Secondary Fermentation -------------------- --------------------- ---------------------------- Oxydation Risk Increased risk of oxydation. No increased risk of ...


5

I think secondary "fermentation" is kind of a misnomer, since fermentation is largely complete by this point. It's more of a secondary "clarification" stage where yeast and other stuff falls out to the vessel bottom. Given this, I think it would certainly be safe to try. All of the alcohol is already in there, acting as a natural preservative. If anything ...


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


4

I agree with Jeff L, that secondary is useful for particular things. To your question, I only ever do a 'secondary' when adding fruit or extended aging. My beers clear just fine after two weeks in the fermenting vessel. I've never experienced off flavors from that two weeks on the yeast, and I always dry hop in the primary. For me I can't find any reason ...


4

In addition to everyone else's comments, I would add that temperature swings within the first 72 hours are dangerous for the flavor of the beer, but outside of that window, the fermentation is mostly finished, in terms of volume, so it's harder to ruin the flavor. It sounds like you were barely outside that window. However, you were definitely too warm for ...


4

I think this same answer applies here: What's the point of secondary fermentation The purpose of n-ary isn't more fermentation, but aging, clarifying, etc. So for me, no it doesn't provide any additional benefit. The only time I use a secondary vessel is for fruit additions or extended aging. I've never found a need for a third vessel.


4

Time is one factor and strength is another. For average strength (up to maybe 1.070) beers, 2-3 months is no problem. For beer over that very much, I'd add yeast at maybe 3 months of age.


4

After beer is done fermenting there is still some residual co2 remaining in solution. The amount left over depends on the temperature you fermented at but if you raise the temperature of the beer the co2 will be released from solution. This is what is causing the activity in your airlock. Chances are that the beer was done fermenting after 5-7 days and ...


4

Once fermentation is mostly complete, keeping the fermentor at the ideal temperature (68, in this case) is less important. The yeast tend to give off fusels and other off flavors at high temperatures mainly during the early stages of fermentation, so raising the temperature won't matter as much. Since fermentation is mostly complete, lowering the temperature ...



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