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18

The general principle is based on density. That is, less dense things will float on top of denser things. By analogy, imagine a human floating in a pool of water. Now imagine a human floating in a pool of saltwater- the human will float higher in the saltwater, since the density of the saltwater is higher. A hydrometer works similarly- it's just a ...


8

Good Answer by Fishtoaster. The science is ancient, discovered by Archimedes. 1: Any object, wholly or partially immersed in a fluid, is buoyed up by a force equal to the weight of the fluid displaced by the object. In other words, if you put a ball, with volume 1 litre completely under water, there is an upwards force on the ball (buoyancy or flotation) ...


7

I'm deliberately avoiding addressing whether this question is appropriate for this forum. A question was posted on meta regarding that issue, presumably in response to this question, so it's possible that this will still be closed. In the meantime, however... You could brew beer with potatoes, and there would, of course, be challenges in that alone - ...


3

A good book on English style beer is Amber, Gold & Black. It is a fairly comprehensive history of beer in Britain. I have taken a step further back to beyond the use of hops and just picked up Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers. This goes into more detail and includes the folkloric backgrounds of the individual ingredients. For Belgian beers, pick up ...


2

Radical Brewing by randy Mosher might be a good choice. He covers a lot of ground, so he doesn't ever spend more than a few pages on any given topic (malting, hops, etc), but he does a great job of covering the basics of pretty much all aspects of brewing. He even has some chapters on creating an automated home brewery and malting at home, I think.


1

Amateur and scientific interest in beermaking is increasing, but it is a much younger subject than that of winemaking. I would direct you to research done on wine maturation for an answer to your question. Keep in mind though, that strong scientific research will likely be limited. Any huge breakthroughs discovered by a company's internal lab would probably ...


1

You are almost exactly describing Designing Great Beers by Ray Daniels. This book has two parts. The first part goes into the science of malt, hops, water, etc. The second part describes all the classic styles, going into history, technical parameters, and ingredients that have won NHC competitions. The history is always very well researched (he cites ...


1

I am not sure where you are located, but there was a book published in the UK in 1990 called "The Historical Companion to House-Brewing" There is a synopsis of the book on a more recent reprint. I paraphrase from the inner cover blurb... "The book contains a wealth of detailed historical information on European beers, with recipes from the 15th to 19th ...



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