Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Star-San kills yeast. Star-san doesn't discriminate across different microbes. Despite that yeast can survive a pH2 solution, the pH is not the killing action of StarSan, its the redox reaction on the cell membranes of microbes that does the killing. The low pH is just what indicates that StarSan is active, not how it kills. Keep in mind too that ...


9

Just use water. The evaporating liquid does not need to be a sanitizer, per se.


8

"Milton Sterilising Fluid allows you to sterilise in just 15 minutes, killing bacteria, viruses, fungi and spores (tough dormant bacteria). It has been used in hospitals for many years as a simple and very reliable method." Wow. Sounds way stronger than needed for brewing! I wonder whats in it? "Milton Fluid is made of an aqueous solution of ...


8

If the sanitizer was StarSan, then you'll be fine. At the usual concentration of 1oz per 5 gallons, it's safe - even safe enough to drink. StarSan is phosphoric acid and surfactants - coke is also largely phosphoric acid and sugar, so the two are in someways similar. In a radio program, Charlie Talley, 5 star chemicals allegedly drank a glass of starsan, ...


6

How to Brew by John Palmer recommends soaking equipment for 20 minutes, and says that rinsing isn't absolutely necessary for the recommended concentration. The concentration he mentions is 1 tablespoon of bleach to 1 gallon of water (4 ml per liter). I avoid bleach. I'm too worried about it introducing off flavors if it's not completely gone, and would ...


6

If you're using a powdered sanitizer, like One Step, it doesn't respond well to storage. It's a percarbonate based sanitizer that depends on O2 to work. If you store a mixed solution long, the O2 bubbles out making it unreliable. If you use Iodophor, you can store it for a week or 2 until it loses its color. It you use StarSan and mix it with distilled ...


6

You can store star san in an air tight container for up to 2-3 weeks and as long as the pH is below 3 it is still good. It is also best to mix with RO or distilled which will keep the solution from becoming cloudy. If you use regular tap water the minerals will react with the acid and can turn the star san cloudy but it still is ok to use as long as the pH ...


6

Charlie Talley from StarSan has said that 30 second contact time is 99+% effective. That is based on tests that they've done. Immersion isn't necessary. I keep StarSan in a spray bottle and just spray things down, wait 30 seconds, and use them.


5

Oxiclean is a fine cleaner, requiring just a few minutes contact to clean, depending upon how soiled the equipment is. As it's decomposition includes hydrogen peroxide, it can also be used as a sanitizer in sufficient dosage. Hydrogen peroxide is a great sanitizer, but there are some drawbacks it's corrosive to metals, since the peroxide increases the ...


4

I think all the info you want is at their home page (relevant snippets below): The formulation of our C-Brite is a federally approved sanitizer...we learned last year...that sanitizers must be registered on a State-by-State basis...neither we nor our producer is willing to do....we have had to take the product and sell it as a cleanser instead, ...


3

I would suggest the iodine-based sanitizer knows as "Iodophor" if you really feel the need to sanitize the water: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodophor This stuff is an iodine-based sanitizer, fairly common in homebrewing (but probably not as common as Star San). I started out my homebrewing career with it, and still have some left. A big bottle goes a ...


3

Starsan is safe to consume once diluted to the recommended concentration (1 fl.oz/30ml to 5 gallons/20 liters.) A quart of starsan in 5 gallons would not kill the yeast - made up starsan has a pH around 2.6-3.0 depending upon your water hardness. Once diluted in 5 gallons of beer, the starsan is diluted a further 20 times. (1 quart in 5 gallons.) That ...


3

Keep in mind that you don't actually have to submerge things in StarSan for it to be effective. You can mix it in a spray bottle with distilled water. It will stay good for months at least...a year isn't out if the question. Then you can spray things rather than submersing them in a bucketful. A 30 second contact time is 99.5% effective according to ...


3

That's nasty stuff. Handle with gloves! Paracetic Acid comes in several concentrations if you have the 5% Paracetic Acid solution then you should shoot for 1% of the solution in your volume of water. So 1L would need 10ml of parasafe and then scale up or down from there. Honestly I'd skip it, and make your own sanitizer. In a pinch where I'm out of starsan ...


3

I've not used it myself, but found that some high ranking members over at www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk use it. They say they got it at the Pharmacist at ASDA for about £4.50 for a 500ml bottle. This is then diluted to 2.5ml in 2000ml water, so it's going to last a while! 1.25ml/l is the usual concentration. 2.5ml/l is the maximum no-rinse concentration. ...


3

I have never worked with VWP. But it appears to be a chlorine based agent. Chlorine based agents lose their potency quickly after dilution (regardless of solution clarity or pH). In general, there is no added advantage to keep your brewing hardware in a solution until the next brew cycle. I'd recommend making a fresh solution each brew day. If you ...


3

Turbo yeast is faster than beer yeast, so no bacteriae have much chances to proliferate. Even if there is a bacterial or wild yeast infection no one cares, as that fermented stuff is distilled. For that matter, whisky distillers don't sterilize their wort before fermenting it, and some level of bacterial infection is considered necessary for the ...


2

I can't speak with any authority, but it appears to be similar but not identical. The color of the product appears more amber/brown, and the disclaimer that it needs to be drained well doesn't seem to be quite the same as StarSan's motto of "don't fear the foam". However, they are both acid-based sanitizers and likely work in a similar method. If it's ...


2

So, I had a 1600ml starter for my lager and it took off aggressively. I had to put a blow-off tube on my flask. I let the tube drop into about 3 inches of star-San. When the starter was all done, I had a good quarter inch of yeasties in the star-San. I have read all over these forums that that yeast would be useless. It was soaking in the star-San for 3 ...


2

First of all, IMO it's a bad idea to use any chlorine based sanitizer. You're setting yourself up to possibly end up with chlorophenols in your beer. In addition, it needs to be rinsed and if you don't use boiled water to rinse, you're undoing your sanitation routine. Percarbonate based sanitizers lose their ability to produce O2 quickly, which makes them ...


2

I keep mixed star san in my corny kegs for storage, that's always been fine. But that star san is only used to keep the inside of the kegs clean during their down time. We keep an eye on as to how long they have been in there and purge them with CO2. For brewing use, I also keep a spray bottle of it handy, checking the PH every now and again. I've ...


2

Star San is not a cleaner, only a sanitizer. But boy is it a great sanitizer; well worth the price. 30 second contact time, foams readily, no-rinse, breaks down to yeast nutrient. Only thing I'll use or recommend. (Hint: mix it with distilled water, and it'll last "indefinitely"; that sure helps the cost go down. :)


2

StarSan looks like it's available in your area. I use their sanitizer and it works great! As they say, "don't fear the foam!"


1

If rinse water is at a premium, you could spray a shot of sulphite solution in each bottle. This will release a burst of sulphite gas, and since the sulphite is slightly acidic (or acts as an acid; I'm not a chemist), it also neutralizes the (alkaline) bleach solution, making it easier to rinse out. I've used this method lots of times in the past with good ...


1

Crossing all information I take from you all, Palmer, Papazien, and sparse in internet, I tried 2 solutions being there very adherent to what is explained in the Papazien's book: First of all, it cannot be used in metals (aluminium neither in stainless steal), and the home bleach need to have about 5% of Chlorine. I use it only in glass, plastic, hoses, ... ...


1

I used to use bleach when i first started and would always rinse. I would soak the bottles for a couple hours thn rinse and let dry on a tree. I never had problems but decided that starsan or iodine no rinse solutions were easier and faster.


1

This question has been answered already, but I wanted to add to the testimonials! It's definitely worth the cost and lasts for months (I've never gone a year but I wouldn't be afraid to). Having a spray bottle is very handy for the fact that it works quick and is reliable. It may be small, but no one has touched on this yet: the customer service is ...


1

The way I was taught, cleaners are used for anything visible, such as hop material at the top of a carboy or a tube filled with gunk, and sanitizer is for everything contacting your beer that you CAN'T see. Using a good sanitizer will reduce the population of bacteria on equipment surfaces to as low as possible. I can't comment on oxiclean (which would be ...


1

I tried using a swamp cooler, but found picnic ice packs to be much more effective. After the initial investment, they are free. I just change them out a couple of times a day for the first three to four days.


1

I'd personally use bleach for this--get some white fabric instead. One teaspoon per gallon is a good minimal concentration. Maybe try 2 tsp. Whatever you use, it will end up concentrating, as evaporation (like distillation) will leave behind everything but the water. Wash your fabric occasionally to remove this concentration (phosphates and organic ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible