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Sorry if this comes a bit too late, however, about halfway down in the comments section on the guide/blog which you reference (http://www.taylor-madeak.org/index.php/2008/10/17/growing-koji-for-homebrewing-sake?page=3), there is a comment by the blog author stating: You're right in koji that has gone to spore not being suitable for adding to sake - at ...


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It's usually 1/2 oz of amylase per 10lb of enzyme free grain. Each product of amylase may differ in dosage, but should be documented. It will still need a mash of proper temp and ph. Generally a cereal mash is used, which uses up to 50% enzyme grain to convert the non enzyme grain. For 100% rice mash you will need amylase and rice hulls (lautering ...


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I just educated myself on this, and I found a description of the sake making process ( http://www.taylor-madeak.org/index.php/2008/10/17/growing-koji-for-homebrewing-sake?page=2 ). They explicitly state that you can store the culture for next use. What they don't say is how fragile this culture is. But it sounds quite stable, so I guess you have to buy it ...


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While it wouldn't be literally the same process (in saké production starch degradation and alcohol production take place simultaneously, in the presence of two different types of organisms which have different and not necessarily compatible optimum conditions), something similar is definitely practiced in brewing, in which yeast are encouraged to make more ...


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Yes Its all about gradually allowing the yeast to strengthen its cell walls for the target ABV. Hitting the yeast all at once with all the fermentables is like having a body builder eat 1/2 a cow of meat and expect him to lift twice as much the next day... Eating the meat alone will kill him on the first day. For most beers above 10% they benifiet from ...


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Once you've innoculated and are ready for fermentation you can put them in. You may want to add a Pectic Enzyme as well to break down the complex sugars and help with the clearing. Depending on the pulpiness of the plums, you may need to rack and strain more. You should also need only about 0.5 tsp of koji added to 400g of starter rice, which adds up to 0....


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You probably could have added moisture by leaving the jars of hot water open. How does the koji rice taste? I don't know if it will have much effect on the flavor as I've not made sake with spore laden rice. The taste of the rice will give you some idea but keep in mind that you will be diluting this rice with a lot more regular rice. I'd say your koji ...


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All the info you need is at: http://homebrewsake.com/home/recipe/. Another outstanding site for sake brewing is http://www.taylor-madeak.org/index.php Both sites have recipes and step by step procedures for commercial quality sake. Will



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