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9

I would just leave it another couple of weeks - that strain is notorious for stalling after a quick start, but it will pick up again. The Wyeast yeast strain guide for 3274 says this: This strain is notorious for a rapid and vigorous start to fermentation, only to stick around 1.035 S.G. Fermentation will finish, given time and warm temperatures. ...


8

"Farmhouse Ales" (Markowski, Brewers Publications) confirms that traditionally saison – while, yes, brewed in the winter or spring and needing to keep until the summer – obtained what preservation they did have from hops, not alcohol. It also mentions that sourness was an accepted part of saison (and in fact many beer styles :) until relatively recently. ...


5

Sorry to say that looks like the beginning of a pellicle, meaning your beer is infected. But if you drink it quickly, you may avoid the worst of it. Best case, it might even taste good! And NEVER put that heater in your beer! Put the beer in a tub of water and put the heater in the water.


4

The wikipedia article on Saison is not terribly helpful. In one paragraph it states that traditionally, saison beers were less than 3% alcohol: originally saisons were meant to be refreshing and thus had alcohol levels less than 3% In the very next paragraph, it says The ale had to be strong to prevent spoilage during the long storage Strong or ...


4

I don't think you will have a problem at all - even though it is technically 6x the recipe, it is still a relatively small proportion of your whole batch, which is mostly pils. Sure, the color won't be as light, but I think the sweetness won't be crazy overwhelming with under 1lb and will probably be nice to have another flavor in the beer aside from ...


4

If you have a cooler that will hold your fermentor (i've used my mash tun with a blanket or sleeping bag draped over it to hold the cold in), 4+ plastic bottles that you can fill with water & freeze (ice packs also work), and a closet that you can keep at a semi-stable temperature, you might be OK with either of them, but you'd probably also want room ...


3

What is your vessel? The bugs in Roeselare need more oxygen than yeast does. I've heard that using a plastic bucket, which lets in quite a bit of oxygen, can drop the pellicle in as little as 6 months. I've also seen people use the wooden-stick-in-a-carboy method that have dropped between 1 and 2 years. Like @Fishtoaster said, some people wait until the ...


3

I've been looking around and I can't find an account of someone who had their pellicle ever drop, including one guy going on 2 years. The accepted practice seems to be to rack it from underneath the pellicle when it's ready.


2

I used WY 3724 in my last saison. My records show 60 days to go from 1.053 to 1.005, but I kept the temperature at 88 F. for most of that. For the first few days, the yeast is very active. However, the krausen falls, and the yeast slows down once 50% apparent attenuation is reached. If you raise the temperature and are patient, the yeast will keep going and ...


2

Using a saison yeast will make a completely different beer. Is that OK with you? IMO, you'd be better off trying to find a way to keep the batch cool rather than radically altering the beer you want to make.


1

Nope. Keep your priming sugars the same. Explanation: The sugars we usually use for carbonation is 100% (or near 100%) fermentable. Thus, it will cause the same amount of carbonation.


1

Make a starter ASAP. That is the only way to know if anything survived. Chances are slim as the frozen cells rapture when frozen. If the starter picks up, then step it up and harvest from that. If you want to freeze your yeast you need special "anti-freeze" so that the cells do not rapture.


1

The viability will have been seriously affected you may have some OK cells in there, but the formation of ice crystals with in the cells will have ruptured the majority of the cells. You may be able to make a starter from it.


1

My co author, Drew Beechum, is pretty much recognized as the master of saison. In our book "Experimental Homebrewing" he writes about 565 and how temprementl it can be. For one thing, you need to raise the temp into the 80s after the first couple weeks in order to get the yeast to finish. That will clean up a lot of the diacxetyl. Most surprisingly, it's ...


1

As long as your yeast is healthy and abundant and you're not cold-crashing the beer as soon as fermentation tails off, you'll be fine. I've fermented with a number of Saison and Belgian strains (though I can't remember which off the top of my head) and I've never had any problems with diacetyl. Also, basically any strain that's known to produce diacetyl in ...


1

If you're scaling everything else linearly, you want to do the same with the orange peel, too.


1

What yeast are you using? I've had 2-3 month primaries with saisons in the past, nothing to worry about. From http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain_detail.cfm?ID=60 This strain is notorious for a rapid and vigorous start to fermentation, only to stick around 1.035 S.G. Fermentation will finish, given time and warm temperatures.


1

In my dealings with Saison yeast they take a bloody long time to finish primary fermentation, 105 days doesn't sound untoward to me. You'll find that it'll be slowly bubbling for the whole time. It's definitely a patience yeast, and you'll probably want to make enough so you can check the gravity every 3-4 weeks to ensure it's still going (and to give you ...


1

To answer your first question: "In the base malt or steeped". Saison Dupont uses a mashing method, they do not used steeped grains because all the specialty grains can be added to the mash to achieve the desired flavor as well as fermentable sugars. I will go out on a limb and say that 99.9% of commercial beers do not use the steeping grain method used in ...


1

For your next one, you may want to consider WLP 566, which IIRC is derived/genetically selected from Dupont WLP565/Wy3724. I took a 1.1 Saison/Tripel down to 1.015, but it took about 45 days. I did use a lower temperature (I think in the mid-70s), as I wanted to limit phenols and esters, and have it just be the hint of saisony barnyardiness.


1

IMO, a week isn't too long. But I question whether you actually need a d rest. Can you taste diacetyl? If not, you don't need the rest.


1

To specifically answer your question "has anyone had this long of a growth phase with this yeast?", the answer is "yes". It was a while back but I recall comments about how the French (yeast) had an attitude, and they'd eat whenever it damn well pleased them, and no sooner. I'm not sure what you call yeast like that, but my experience includes a saison ...



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