Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

If home brew goes bad, then you can taste it. Even then, it still won't make you sick. It just tastes bad. All the warnings about maintaining good sanitation are just to keep your beer tasting good - not to prevent disease. I suppose you could get sick if you didn't rinse out any cleaning chemicals that you used. And if you were distilling, then you could ...


8

There are several issues with a large propane burner used indoors (or natural gas/methane for that matter - propane is derived from NG, in fact). The issues with a large open flame on a mobile base inside your house are obvious. The burner would have to be situated at a distance from any combustibles, similar to safely installing a wood stove. Then ...


7

do not burn propane indoors without ventilation, it produces carbon dioxide when burned, this could potentially fill up your basement and suffocate you. Also incomplete combustion of propane will produce carbon monoxide which is toxic.


6

Once the wort has fermented, no harmful pathogens (germs) can grow in beer - an old beer may degrade and become stale, but it's never harmful to drink. Historically, beer was brewed in part to avoid drinking contaminated water. There are many references on the net - just a quick search brings up this: Beer is certainly not hospitable for the growth of ...


6

In ancient times brewing was used to make dirty water safe to drink. So relax and as long as it smells and tastes OK everything is fine.


5

As long as your beer has alcohol in it, it is pretty much guaranteed to be safe to drink. Lots of live yeast in the beer can give you gas, and acetaldehyde can worsen hangovers, but other than that you're safe.


4

Get a wort chiller, immersion are really easy to make and pretty cheap to buy. That way you don't have to move the pot in order to chill. Then get a pot with a spigot so that you can simply use gravity to move the chilled wort from the boiling pot into your fermenter. Also you could mash on your propane burner. Just need to be a bit more attentive and stir ...


3

Propane indoors would indeed be a bad idea. What about switching to an electric based method like a heatstick? The heatsticks are a great option if you have GFI outlets, or can install them. With two of them (plugged into different circuits) you should be able to boil quite quickly.


3

You can certainly try it. That's the major advantage of homebrewing. However, just because these beers are coming prepackaged nowadays doesn't mean that's the way its done in the place of origin. These things evolved really as beer cocktails. I think its far better to just add the lemonade to the beer in the glass. That way you have great beer to begin ...


1

One difficulty you'll have with getting that signature shandy flavor when adding fruit to secondary is that the sweetness (sugar) of the juice will get converted to alcohol by the yeast, leaving you with mostly aroma, and a little flavor. A lot of people don't recognize how much sugar plays into the overall taste of the fruit. Without the sugars, it is not ...


1

I've wrapped towels, insulation, and lots of other things around a FermWrap without issue. I like to use mine for sour-mashing, so I'll place a FermWrap around a boil kettle, then use a heating blanket to help give it insulation and an extra heat boost. There have been no adverse effects, and nothing has caught fire yet, so I wouldn't be too concerned ...


1

For moving full and closed fermenters most home improvement stores and garden centers have rolling platforms for large planters that might help. Just keep a couple hands on it as you roll it to wherever it needs to go. Other than that try to do all your brew process in one area and let gravity or pumps help with moving liquids.


1

Why do you mash inside and boil outside? I brew in keggles - 13-15 gallon boils, 10-12 gallon fermentations. Fermentation is in two 6.5 gallon buckets which aren't too difficult to move (6.5 gallons weigh 52 pounds). I brew in the garage and ferment in the house, about 100' away and up 8 steps. I would like to switch to one 15 gallon fermentor, but I ...


1

I use a two vessel system with pumps, like the brutus system, this makes it a lot easier for mashing and boiling I would recommend not straining, using a siphon would be a lot easier, also, get a chiller (immersion or plate) to prevent yourself from moving to the cooling bath. You'll still need to move the bucket/fermenter with the beer in it, but that's ...


1

Could the flavor be described as a burned flavor? Are you applying direct heat to the mash tun? Do you have a heating element in direct contact with the wort, like in a RIMS system? It sounds to me like you may have burned or scorched your mash or wort. Direct heat to the mash tun is fine if you have a false bottom, but be careful if the malt is at the floor ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible