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7

Saving yeast is easier than some make it out to be. When you xfer the beer to package it (or to a secondary) simply leave a little beer behind in the fermenter. Use that beer to swirl up the slurry in the fermenter and pour it into 2 sanitized containers. Store those in the fridge. Each container should enough yeast to ferment an average batch of beer. ...


5

Mostly economical, yes. Another reason is potentially limited (or non-existent) commercial availability of specific strains. Either the yeast company's seasonal strain releases or something cultivated from yeast remaining in the bottle. Another reason is to develop a "house" strain, or to modify the behavior of an existing strain. For instance, the ...


4

The short answer is yes, it's the same species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, so you can do it. The long answer is, you will have a hard time getting it to taste the same as commercially produced nutritional yeast (a.k.a. nooch). Just as there are dozens of different strains of homebrew yeast, selectively bred for different characteristics, there are ...


3

I have two different mashed potato recipes that I love. One includes bacon and steamed shredded cabbage (obviously out of the question here), the other is Stone's IPA garlicky mashed potatos, which calls for 1/4 tsp of brewer's yeast. As a personal suggestion, unless someone has an aversion to the potato skins, I prefer to leave them 100% on for texture ...


3

I assume they're all different re-pitches of the same original strain? Certainly you would want to keep different strains apart so you can pitch based on their desired properties. But even still, I would keep the harvested yeast separate, if only so you can use them in a FIFO order of collection. The method you're using the harvest yeast has a reliable ...


2

You should gelatin fining in a separate vessel than the one primary was in if you want to save the yeast. You are correct in thinking that you do not really want that gelatin mess coming out with the yeast you plan to re pitch. It will coat the yeast and slow their growth and performance the second time around. This is probably on of the few times a ...


2

You can pour sterile, de-oxygenated water on it. De-oxygenated water is just boiled and cooled water.


1

It might be worth experimenting with adding it to soups and stews. Many traditional recipes call for bay leaves or other bitter herbs; a bit of hops bitterness might be a very appropriate variation. A bit of extra protein and vitamins, at least!


1

You'd be better off saving the cake from the one gallon batch in small jars and reusing that. Putting even half a smack pack into a normal sized mason jar will leave too much surface area and headspace for oxygen exposure. You need to minimize that to extend the livelihood of the yeast. If you wanted to invest in some pipetting equipment and some small ...


1

According to Mr Malty, you'd need about 1/3 of a pack for 1 gallon at 1.048 for direct pitching. The yeast will only remain highly viable for 2-4 weeks, though I've certainly pitched 6 month old washes that have functioned, though it was likely way under pitched. I would recommend using Mr Malty to determine how much to pitch in your 1 gallon batch (which ...


1

There is so little yeast in one of those packs that you'll have a really difficult time dividing it properly. You need to make a starter for any beer over 1.040 OG (despite what the yeast companies would have you believe). You ask if there's a practical solution and there really isn't a good way to do what you want to do. You could make a starter and save ...


1

"The cake filled a growler, and after a week in the fridge has settled to about 2/3 yeast, 1/3 beer." That's 2/3 trub. The only way to know how much of it is yeast is to use a microscope. I wouldn't recommend just pitching in a new batch. Since you didn't wash it, it is going to have high amounts of non-yeast trub (proteins, lipids, et al). If you make a ...


1

I second Denny Conn's explanation. I have been repitching yeast and have had no ill effects when creating a yeast starter. I usally pitch 1/4 C. of slurry to a 1.040 wort of the size that Beersmith calculates for me and have had no problems. I keep the yeast from the Primary and get about 4-5 more batches from the first generation (second pitching) of the ...


1

The guys at Coopers have written up a few guides for using the yeast from their (very popular) Pale Ale. A lot of people like using this yeast particularly because the beer is additive and preservative free. From one of the discussion threads on their site... (linked below) Coopers, encourage home brewers to use the yeast from naturally conditioned ...


1

I generally rinse the yeast, separating it from the trub / hop bits before storing it. I've stored it for quite awhile in the fridge and never had a problem. I believe that it was the brewing network that mentioned this is a good practice for some yeasts, such as Oktoberfest. I've even rinsed the next generation and reused it. After about 4 times I stop ...



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