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25

How to Rinse Yeast for Reuse Collect yeast solids from fermentation. Place yeast in sanitized (or better yet, sterile) container with water. The water volume should be around 4-5X that of the yeast. A cylindrical, tall container with a screw-on cap works well. Leave some headspace for air for shaking. Seal the container. Shake vigorously. Really ...


17

I started cropping and repitching from my third batch ever. It is not hard at all, actually results in better beer, saves money, and is kinda fun. You get to use flasks and pour stuff back and forth and rub your chin and look wise. This article from the Wyeast people is geared toward commercial breweries, but I learned a lot about cropping from it. I ...


7

I have tried both methods repeatedly and don't really see any difference. I have stored yeast with trub up to 5 months and have gotten great results reusing it once I made a starter. I recently made back to back batches of rye IPA, one with yeast mixed with trub, the other from the same yeast slurry that had been rinsed. There was no difference in either ...


7

The short answer is that you can leave it for 2-4 weeks in the fridge and pitch directly. Longer than that, and it's best to make a starter from a small amount of the slurry to avoid a sluggish start and yeast bite from many dead yeast cells.


7

Saving yeast is easier than some make it out to be. When you xfer the beer to package it (or to a secondary) simply leave a little beer behind in the fermenter. Use that beer to swirl up the slurry in the fermenter and pour it into 2 sanitized containers. Store those in the fridge. Each container should enough yeast to ferment an average batch of beer. ...


6

I used to pitch on cake but then started repitching less of the yeast. I'd say its better to grab a sanitize quart jar and pitch a small slug of the cake. Aerate your wort as usual and pitch the slug of yeast. This is the easiest way to reuse if you brew at the same time as racking something else over. You'll get some cell growth which is important for ...


6

In short, depending on the age of the cake there should be no need to re-aerate the wort for growth purposes. Using the full on yeast cake will make fine beer without the need of extra O2 for yeast growth. The downside to this practice is that without some active reproduction going on you don't always get the true flavor profile of the yeast in the beer. ...


6

The bottom layer contains more trub, but does also contain yeast. The top layer is formed after the majority of the trub has already settled, so it's more or less pure yeast on top. You don't have too much - actually the opposite. It's best to make a starter - even though it looks like a lot of yeast, it will be vastly underpitched in a 5 gallon brew. I'd ...


6

Yes, I have saved tons of money by growing my own yeast. It just takes a little planning and time. Slants or glycol storage are going to be your best bet. Get a pressure cooker to acts as a makeshift auto-clave for sterilization. With some yeasts coming in at $6-$9 a vial, this will help you get the most out of that money. In fact I have pulled proprietary ...


5

I'd not heard of yeast scarring before, so I researched a bit. From Replicative ageing and senescence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the impact on brewing fermentations Ageing is the predetermined progressive transition of an individual cell from youth to old age that finally culminates in death. Yeast replicative ageing is a function of the ...


5

Keep in mind that what applies to a commercial operation often has no applicability to homebrewing. Most homebrewers I know who have tried acid washing their yeast end up deciding that it's a PITA for little to no payback. In addition, unless you have a lab, the more you mess with your yeast the greater the chance of contamination. While the theory you ...


5

The pitch rate for lagers is generally twice that of an ale. However, pitching onto a used yeast cake generally results in overpitching by a factor of around 100. Overpitching by this amount is never recommended. In any case, it does make beer, and works for both ales and lagers with the same effects.


5

Storing yeast in the fridge (i.e. above 0C/32F) is great if you can use the yeast within a few weeks, or a couple of months at the most. Any longer than that, and cells will die and the yeast becomes less viable, Then, a starter is required to step up the cell count to ensure you pitch enough viable cells. An alternative is storing the yeast in a 25-30% ...


5

If you're concerned about using good practice, you really shouldn't rack fresh wort onto a used yeast cake. The trub contains a lot more than just healthy yeast, and doing this doesn't allow you to control your pitch rate. I know that doesn't really answer the question, but it seems that your general procedure leaves more room for error than the oxygen ...


5

Mostly economical, yes. Another reason is potentially limited (or non-existent) commercial availability of specific strains. Either the yeast company's seasonal strain releases or something cultivated from yeast remaining in the bottle. Another reason is to develop a "house" strain, or to modify the behavior of an existing strain. For instance, the ...


4

From White Labs Yeast Storage and Maintenance: As yeast sit in storage, they consume their glycogen reserves. Glycogen deprivation weakens their cell walls, and makes them more susceptible to rupture. Cold temperatures retard this process, but you want to avoid freezing yeast, as ice crystals will also rupture cells. The ideal storage ...


4

I've been listening to Basic Brewing Radio. Here are some episodes about reusing yeast. November 1st, 2007 Reusing yeast February 7th, 2008 Advanced yeast handling February 26th, 2009 Carboy top-cropping September 3rd, 2009 Yeast Ranching October 27th, November 3rd, November 10th, 2005 Interviews with Dave Logsdon of WYeast


4

These gravities are pretty close together so it doesn't really matter much which you brew first. As long as the yeast is sitting in the base of the fermentor as a tight cake you can pull more than enough beer out without it effecting the next one too much. And you don't need to pitch the whole cake, just half a pint or so. I have done this with good ...


4

Dry yeast will be fine at room temperature for a short period. However, I'd be concerned about pitching rates and contamination. Did you weigh out the yeast before, so that you pitched 5-6g? If you only eyeballed it, then it might we way off, since pouring a quantity from the sachet is difficult - the sachet isn't full to begin with. If you weighed it, or ...


4

I have been reusing my yeast for several years now. I don't do it correctly, but it has worked out for me. I would like to share what I actually do, and you can balance that against all the really great information regarding the proper care and feeding of yeast. The only limiting factor that I really care about is autolysis, as this will create formaldehyde ...


4

A krausen is created mostly from coagulating proteins and high yeast activity. You may still get a krausen at ale temps with the lager yeast due to the level of activity, but in general it's hit and miss how much yeast you get from top cropping, even more so with a bottom fermenting strain. In your shoes, I would divide the smack pack yeast between two ...


4

You don't necessarily need to make a starter if you are re-pitching within a few weeks because the viability of the yeast will still be pretty high. But, if you store the yeast for much time you should always make a starter. This ensures that the yeast is still viable and it will help ensure the yeast are active so you don't have a long lag time during ...


4

The short answer is yes, it's the same species of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, so you can do it. The long answer is, you will have a hard time getting it to taste the same as commercially produced nutritional yeast (a.k.a. nooch). Just as there are dozens of different strains of homebrew yeast, selectively bred for different characteristics, there are ...


3

I don't think the process of commercially drying yeast is straightforward - it involves a partial vacuum or a stream of filtered air to make the liquid suspending the yeast evaporate faster - and it's probably difficult to reach the levels of hygiene required in a homebrew setting. If you want to preserve yeast for a long period, 1 year or more, you can ...


3

Simply put it is not practical for the homebrewer as you need to perform the drying under sterile conditions.


3

Store the yeast at normal fridge temps, but keep it away from the top shelf where the coldest air comes out of the vents (although its not the coldest part of the fridge). The bottom of the fridge is the coldest spot and stuff is less likely to freezer there. Secondly, the optimum storage medium in the fridge is water. After you take a sample of yeast ...


3

Well, the easiest way to re-use yeast is to brew a new batch on the same day that you're transferring another batch into kegs/bottles and then rack the new wort onto the leftover yeast cake. Bam. You've re-used yeast. At home, I have a handful of Erlenmeyer flasks and extra stoppers. Basically what I do is make a mini-starter with the yeast that's ...


3

It's mostly a toss-up, but I'd suggest the 80 shilling as the first beer. The APA will leave considerably more hop residue in the fermenter. If you do the APA first, you'll either be adding a lot of spent hops when pitching the yeast, or you'll need to wash the yeast cake.


3

No, there is no danger in leaving it longer and getting more separation. If anything, it means you get even more yeast, although the amount is only a few percent. If there is a lot of trub, then you may want to pour off the yeast into a different vessel to separate it from the trub. The trub falls quickest, so this will be at the bottom of your jar. Store ...


3

Yes, apparently you can. There's a recipe for it here: http://marmitelover.blogspot.no/2011/04/how-to-make-your-own-marmite.html The author says she uses 'top fermentation from a brewery' - which I imagine is the krausen, although on a homebrew scale I wonder if that gives enough yeast. She also mentions that it doesn't taste like the original - lacking ...



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