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14

I know people who do this all the time and their breads are very good, never too dense. You have to remember to treat it like sourdough though. Sourdough yeast takes a long time to rise bread (between 6 and 12 hours) and beer yeast performs very similarly. The "heaviness" or "denseness" all of the other posts refer to is simply because they did not give ...


8

Bread yeast is designed to produce huge amounts of CO2 to aid in rising. Beer yeast is not. Now this is not to say that you CAN'T use brewing yeast, but you will get a more dense bread. The guys at Basic Brewing did an experiment brewing a pale ale with bread yeast and baking bread with Safale-05. They said the bread came out tasting like... bread. But ...


6

Use leftover yeast to make pretzels! So good when their warm and the perfect accompaniment to fresh Beer. My Recipe: Ingredients * 2 teaspoons salt * about 1 Cup of *clean* yeast slurry (Fresh is Best!, but at least warm them up) * 22 ounces all-purpose flour, approximately 4 1/2 cups * 2 ounces melted butter * Egg Wash and Baking Soda for Browning * ...


5

Absolutely you can. I've been doing it for years.


3

If it's a chemical sweetener taste, I don't think there's much you could do. You could try a big cold crash on them, bring them down to 1c or so and slowly pour off amounts where you don't get the chemical sweetener taste. What chemical sweetener did you use? There may be people with similar issues, but for future reference it'd be useful to know what to ...


3

I've been maintaining a starter for about 4 months that I originally cultured from the sludge at the bottom of the primary. I believe it was an American Ale yeast. I treat it just like a sourdough starter. I keep the reserved starter it in the fridge between uses and feed white flour about once a week when I take some for baking. It works great to raise ...


2

I don't particularly like adding much spent grain to bread recipes, it makes the bread too heavy IMO. However, using brewing yeast, either fresh or from a slurry is a great addition. I generally add at least 50% bakers yeast though, it helps the dough to rise quicker.


1

Some ideas: Try to make vinegar with it (see this). To do that you need to leave the beer in contact with air to oxidize and preferably add bacteria (or the mother). You can get it from a non pasteurized vinegar you buy (if it has some sedminent, it is hazy, or some lumps in it it should be good) or from some home made vinegar. Use it for cooking. ...


1

Yes, they're fine to reuse, if: Threads are good Inner seal is good Just make sure to rinse them asap, sanitize them before use, and inspect and toss any worn out ones regularly. The safety seals don't matter, but you may want to consider replacing the caps if you're transporting the beer--there's the chance an officer could claim that the broken seal ...


1

I used some spent grain in a bread recipe, and it was fantastic. Two weeks ago, I brewed a batch of Northern Brewer Caribou Slobber from the extract kit. After getting the wort into the primary, I made a double batch of whole wheat bread and added all my leftover specialty grains to it. For this kit, the grains were 0.25 lbs Briess Caramel 80L, 0.25 lbs ...


1

I tried it once. The bread was very dense. I put me in mind of Terry Pratchett's dwarf bread. It was useless for the fine art of sammichery, but worked well for hors d'oeuvres. (Herrings, strong cheese).



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