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7

Is it already bottled, or is it still in a carboy or other bulk vessel? If you made the wine from fresh fruit and it's still in a bulk vessel, your best bet is to just wait. Leave it in a carboy with an airlock and the gas will come out of suspension. Racking it will help relieve the wine of its CO2, but be careful not to expose it to too much oxygen ...


4

It's a combination of marketing and tradition. For better or worse you're average consumer expects white wine to come in a clear bottle. This is not exclusive however, one example being Riesling which is traditionally bottled in brown glass. Both white and red wine will change when exposed to light (Google "light struck wine" for plenty of interesting ...


4

The commonly repeated belief is that green bottles are better at keeping sunlight out and whites don't need this because they are often refrigerated. I never put much stock into this since worldwide refrigeration was not always common and a most wine is stored out of sunlight anyway. A few winemakers in Sonoma told me that it was tradition based on the ...


2

I have used the Wine Experts kits (premium and ultra premium). They are drinkable in less than 12 months and are 4 gallon kits.


2

The flavour of Red Wines deteriorates greatly due to the breakdown of the wine in the bottle when exposed to UV light. White wines don't have this problem as much as they are much more filtered and do not contain tannens, etc that break down this way. That's my understanding at least, I read something along these lines in the book "Making Good Wine" (ISBN: ...


2

You need to check the gravity of the must/wine to see if fermentation has finished. Specific gravity tells you about the residual sugar in the must/wine. Specific gravity is measured with a hydrometer. (If you know about this then disregard) Bubbling can be from dissolved CO2 in solution. It will come out of the wine as the temperature fluctuates or if ...


1

Another way to provide nucleation sites to promote the CO2 escaping is to add a little sugar or Splendatm (the latter will really release the gas). I'd do this sparingly because it will sweeten the wine, but if it is fairly dry to start with, most people prefer some sweetness to cut the alcohol bite. This really is true with fruit ciders and wines with more ...



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