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7

Is it already bottled, or is it still in a carboy or other bulk vessel? If you made the wine from fresh fruit and it's still in a bulk vessel, your best bet is to just wait. Leave it in a carboy with an airlock and the gas will come out of suspension. Racking it will help relieve the wine of its CO2, but be careful not to expose it to too much oxygen ...


5

It's a combination of marketing and tradition. For better or worse you're average consumer expects white wine to come in a clear bottle. This is not exclusive however, one example being Riesling which is traditionally bottled in brown glass. Both white and red wine will change when exposed to light (Google "light struck wine" for plenty of interesting ...


5

The commonly repeated belief is that green bottles are better at keeping sunlight out and whites don't need this because they are often refrigerated. I never put much stock into this since worldwide refrigeration was not always common and a most wine is stored out of sunlight anyway. A few winemakers in Sonoma told me that it was tradition based on the ...


3

I've successfully made wine in corny kegs and had the wine keep for many years. I use Nitrogen to pressurize the keg, which doesn't dissolve into the beer and provides an inert atmosphere.


2

I have used the Wine Experts kits (premium and ultra premium). They are drinkable in less than 12 months and are 4 gallon kits.


2

It's absolutely possible to do so. The main thing you have to watch out for is oxidation. A bottle of wine, once opened, is going to be consumed fast enough for oxidation to not be a problem. A cask/barrel will not (unless you're a true champ at drinking wine). The trick is to introduce an inert atmosphere above the wine as it's dispensed at low enough ...


2

You need to check the gravity of the must/wine to see if fermentation has finished. Specific gravity tells you about the residual sugar in the must/wine. Specific gravity is measured with a hydrometer. (If you know about this then disregard) Bubbling can be from dissolved CO2 in solution. It will come out of the wine as the temperature fluctuates or if ...


2

The flavour of Red Wines deteriorates greatly due to the breakdown of the wine in the bottle when exposed to UV light. White wines don't have this problem as much as they are much more filtered and do not contain tannens, etc that break down this way. That's my understanding at least, I read something along these lines in the book "Making Good Wine" (ISBN: ...


1

My understanding is that commercial winemakers make extensive use of blending post-fermentation to create a consistent product. They will blend wines makes in the same year, as well as blending wines made in different years. The solera, used primarily in sherry production, is an expression of this process. Another chemical in the must that is important to ...


1

Some commercial wine producers do care about consistency and go to great lengths to ensure a consistent product. Others believe more in the variability and craft aspects of their product with a great year making a great wine and every year being different. Wine makers can add extra water to their wines or mix in a too dry batch; not allowed in France for ...


1

Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


1

My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


1

As it is the stage which contains the majority of the activity (the first 3-4 days 90% of fermentable sugars are consumed), it is also the stage when the majority of waste products are produced by the yeast. The temperature control over this period plus the variety of yeast used will have the largest affect on the flavour profile of the beverage. Obviously ...


1

Another way to provide nucleation sites to promote the CO2 escaping is to add a little sugar or Splendatm (the latter will really release the gas). I'd do this sparingly because it will sweeten the wine, but if it is fairly dry to start with, most people prefer some sweetness to cut the alcohol bite. This really is true with fruit ciders and wines with more ...


1

I'm a designer specialising in wine packaging and I can say that, with the exception of 'great' wines, most decisions about glass are made on purely aesthetic or economic grounds. Great wines that are always aged for long periods are stored in green or brown glass to limit the damage caused by light over time. Wines like the Grand Crus of Bordeaux which are ...



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