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12

Chez, you're in luck. I just wrapped up a double 1-gallon experiment with these two malts. Had the brew-bug one day & two 55 pound sacks of malt. My experiment was simple. I made gallon batches of 1.040 OG beer solely from each malt. Hopping was kept to a single 60 minute addition of about 20 IBUs. I selected a clean ale yeast and fermented cool to ...


12

When calculating sugars used in the wort, how much sugar does honey contain? Is it closer to dry malt extracts, raw cane sugar, dextrose? Honey is loaded with fermentable sugar (think mead...), though not as much as malt extracts. There are "adjuncts" within the honey as well. But you can yet a near-even yield from honey as you could from dry ...


10

This isn't quite what you're asking. I don't think chili peppers have enough sugars in them to produce a strong enough fermentation on their own. I made a chili-pepper beer, which was absolutely fantastic. I made a simple, low-bitterness beer. After fermentation was complete, I racked into a secondary and added 4 types of dried, frozen chilies. I sampled ...


10

Based on a standard Pilsner Malt, for Vienna the barley gets watered some more (44-46% water instead of 42-46%). Also the roasting is slightly higher at 90°C instead of 80-85°C. Munich is made with still more water (up to 47%) and temepratures up to 110°C. Water and higher temperatures lead to a more pronounced Maillard-Reaction and hence formation of darker ...


10

OK, you asked me to leave it as an answer, so here it is: In this order: 1. It's cold. 2. It's got alcohol. 3. It's got enough sugar to go well with Wheaties or is neutral enough to work with Froot Loops. Basically, that means just about anything. 4. Lightly hopped. Hops are tough on morning mouth. But then again, the antibacterial properties in hops ...


8

For me, a good breakfast beer is something I can handle in the morning, or with a hangover. While strong is fine, if I can taste alcohol, it's not going to end well. Mkeller's beer geek breakfast, for example, has too strong an alcohol taste to be a good breakfast stout. I think something malty with smooth flavors works best. Bitter hops just won't do at ...


7

Adding some wheat to the recipe can give some good body and head retention. There are a bunch of other methods as well. Check out this BrewWiki article on Head Retention. The main methods are: The use of body and head enhancing malts such as crystal, wheat, or carafoam The altering of the mash schedule to enhance head retaining proteins The use of heading ...


7

In the pubs the creamy nead is achieved through the CO2/Nitrigen gas mix as mentioned already. It is also achieved by using a stout tap. A stout tap is similar in all respects to a regular tap, however the one significant difference is that inserted into the tap is a small disk that diffuses the beer through a number of small holes around the perimeter of ...


6

I am not sure about "official style guidelines", but I made a double chocolate stout with an exorbitant amount of black patent. It's awesome. Surprisingly the roasted flavor meets the chocolate very well, making it an unconventionally unsweet chocolate stout. +1 for going with what you like.


6

First, for an IPA, that recipe looks a little low on the late hop additions for flavor and aroma for modern US-style IPA. Did you add the 1 oz of cascade as a dry hop called for in the recipe? Their recipe page has it listed on the same line with the yeast rather than the next line, and maybe you missed it; I know I missed it on the first read through. If ...


6

The book "Brewing Classic Styles" covers pretty much the entirety of the BJCP styles with a recipe in every category. Nearly every single recipe is stated first as an extract plus specialty grain recipe first and mini mash and all grain as secondary versions. A couple of them can't really be done as extract versions and those are excluded. It's 80 recipes, ...


6

I can only answer the first part of your question. The sugars in honey vary depending on the type. If you really want to know the contributions you should make a measurement. Specific gravity is a measure of points per pound per gallon (ppg). All you need do is take a pound of honey, add pure water until you have a gallon and measure with a hydrometer. ...


6

I've done two red ales so far. In the first I used a combination of Weyermann Carared (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/weyermann-carared.html) and Simpsons Dark Crystal (http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-ingredients/grain-malts/caramel-malts/simpsons-dark-crystal.html) about half a pound of ...


6

I will warn you to be leery of a lot of recipe sites on the internet. Some are good, some are very bad and you have to know what looks like a good recipe in order to separate them from the bad ones. That said, about the best internet resource for recipes I've found is http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/BeerRecipes .


6

Ordinary Bitter, Mild, Dry Stout, Irish Red. These styles are generally lower OG and use little hops. The ABVs are generally under 5.5%. And these four styles all use the same base malt. Therefore you can maximize your savings purchasing a full sack of base malt. After that you can just get specialty malts as needed; and these styles provide a good ...


6

Special B and CaraPils are as different as night and day, so it's going to be hard to compare them directly. Special B is a very dark Crystal Malt (about 140-150L), typically Belgian in origin, which is used to add flavors like: very dark caramel, raisin, or plum. It is the specialty grain that makes Belgian Amber Abbey Ales taste a bit raisin-like, and ...


5

Take a look at BrewBlogger. According to developer: BrewBlogger is a web-based alternative to software such as BeerSmith, ProMash, and others. I'm busy giving BrewBlogger a try now and I'm pretty impressed. In the commercial space, BeerSmith is quite popular as is ProMash. There are quite a few available in the open source space but the only ...


5

BeerCalculus is really nice to put your recipes together. Since it's a web app, it's platform agnostic. I don't believe it does anything like inventory management. I've used BeerSmith in the past, and it's really nice and worth the money if you need inventory management.


5

What kind of beers do they make? A lot of breweries will have a "house strain" that they use for almost all of their beers. If they do a lot of belgian beers then chances are it's a belgian yeast that creates a lot of fruity esters and spicy phenols. If it's German Ale yeast it's going to have banana and clove like qualities. Just ask the brewery what style ...


5

Brew Your Own recently did a feature on the Gose (Gosebier) style. You can find the full article here as well as the all-grain and extract with grain recipe's. I have copied the all grain recipe here: There She Gose Again (5 gallons/19 L, all-grain) OG = 1.048 FG = 1.012 IBU = 12 SRM = 4 ABV = 4.7% Ingredients: 5 lbs. (2.3 kg) ...


5

As a homebrewer, pretty much all of your beers will be "unfiltered". You can take steps to make them even more unfiltered, but pretty much, you'll always be there. Most production breweries filter their beers through a variety of methods. When they make an unfiltered beer, they just skip those steps. The result is often a grainier beer, something with more ...


5

Many LMEs provide about 1.036 PPG. If this is a five gallon batch, you're talking about a drop of 1.4 points (36*.2/5). Not much to make a big difference in taste IMO. If you want to replace that lost sugar using molasses or syrup, find the points of the sugar and work backwards. Brown Sugar is 46 ppg so you would need .156 pounds to make up the difference ...


5

From what I've read, you can do anything that's small enough to fit in there but large enough not to sift into the beer (eg, coffee beans but not ground coffee, whole hops but not hop pellets). Some suggestions I've found that people have reported working well: Candied Bacon Bits (with a strong porter or stout). Peaches (with a blonde beer) Coffee Beans ...


4

Dry Malt Extract Ups Stores well Easy to repackage in a ZiplocTM bag Gives you more points per pound per gallon than liquid (IE: more gravity per weight) Because it's easier to repackage it keeps longer Downs Makes a dusty mess Becomes a sticky mess if it gets wet (still usable if you can get it out of the package) Can cause your beer to be darker ...


4

I come from Turkey; I live in Istanbul at the moment and I like boza very much. I have had some notes on brewing boza, but I've never tried it myself. The reason I didn't try is mainly that the recipes for the general public calls for bulgur as the main ingredient. (Bulgur is traditionally a very popular food in Turkey and very abundant, so its easy to ...


4

I use BeerAlchemy (Mac/iPhone only), and it does pretty much anything I need, including keeping track of inventory. The iPhone version is really neat, and syncs to the Mac-version. The only thing I miss is listing batches by date, I use a spreadsheet on Google Docs for that.


4

I can't say enough about BrewPal! iPhone app (which is great because I don't brew in front of my computer). Only $0.99! Built in mash (fly, batch, decoction, partial, or steep) and boil timers (so I can enjoy as many homebrews as I want and not forget to add the 15 min hops, irish moss, or wort chiller...). I'm a developer and was going to write my own ...


4

Southern English Brown is mildly sweet and Porter can be fairly dry and and roasty. I think it matters upon the substyle of Porter one is looking at. Robust Porter is the substyle most people are familiar with and I view it very different in flavor and composition that a Southern English Brown. If I was forced to draw the line to bend my thoughts to your ...


4

You do not need to use grape juice. I know that honey has almost no nutrients and such for the yeast cells to eat. Most recipes I've seen have you throw in a teabag (for a few days), or grape juice, or whatnot to add nutrients to the must so the yeast can do it's work. I personally go with Yeast Nutrient and Yeast Energizer. I'd suggest starting with a ...


4

I've had very good luck with this one: http://www.brewersfriend.com/ They have a lot of different tools & calculators and a recipe builder that will save your recipes (up to five for free) and compare them against the beer style guides.



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