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5

Most things will scale just fine linearly, the exception being hop utilization. Wort gravity has an effect on utilization; the higher the gravity the lower the utilization. This is why extract brewers who don't do a full wort boil get less utilization that a full wort boil; the gravity of the wort during boil is higher (they then add water after boil to ...


5

Basically, yes. Small batch brewing is great for what you're talking about experimenting with different ingredients, recipes, etc. They guys at Basic Brewing Radio do it all the time, and here's a pretty good article from BYO, but in general the proportions of the ingredients should be the same. So, if the small batch is 3 pounds 2-row, and 2 pounds wheat, ...


5

Yeah you can scale it down as much as you want . Stove top brews are very easy to manage. The only thing to keep in mind is your efficiency, on a stove top and with a smaller amount of water it can be difficult to perfectly manage your mash temp, because smaller volumes respond more quickly to heat. But with a good thermometer with an alarm (10$ digital meat ...


4

You can scale malt, hops and volumes linearly. While in principle hops don't scale linearly, it's almost linear, and depends upon your kettle geometry. It's not enough of a difference to worry about - the difference is less than the error introduced due to measuring your hops to the nearest 0.1g. Evaporation is also due to kettle geometry, although this ...


3

Nope, at this level everything scales pretty linearly; double up!


3

Maybe it's a typo in your question, but your boil times changed with the Cascade version of the recipe -- all additions are boiled for 60 minutes. Provided you keep the boil times for each addition the same as the original recipe, then, yes, your approach is a good one. In the substituted hop, change the amount so that the total alpha acid contribution ...


3

I mostly agree with chrislarson, but I would propose a few differences, if you wanted to be more precise. Mash: 2X Double the amounts of grain and water. Ensure that your mash tun is also wider, so that your grain bed isn't too tall. Boil: 2X Since you doubled the volume of hot liquor for the mash, you should end up with twice the volume going into the ...


3

Mash: Just double the amounts of grain and water. Boil: You'll need 250% of the water to account for more evaporation (In my experience). Hops: Judging by what BeerSmith tells me when I scale a recipe, you'll need about 175% of the hops by weight. For both bittering and aromatic. Yeast: A 16 oz (.5L) starter has always been enough for me. Even with high ...


3

You don't want to up the specialties on the first pass. If the beer has the right flavor profile you want, then changing those will change the flavor. Furthermore, if you increase say the chocolate malt, the color will change too. I'd start by upping the gravity with base malt until you got to about 80-90% of the final target gravity. Then get the rest ...


2

I currently brew at a 1.5 gal system. The big things I noticed moving from a 10 gallon rig were the changes in brew house efficiency and hop utilization. The dead loss at the bottom of your mash tun and kettle will be more pronounced. Longer sparging and whirlpooling are suggested.


2

There are plenty of online dilution calculators, but if you want a formula, the below was taken from Mechanics of No Sparge Brewing: The Dilution Formula (reference Ray Daniels, Designing Great Beers) Most of the dilution/gravity calculations found in this write up are based on a simple formula that states: Beg Volume * Beg Gravity=End Volume * ...


2

In your position, I'd just brew it, and see how you like the outcome. Many factors affect perception of bitterness - it's far from an exact science. For instance, if the recipe has been stored for any length of time at room temperature, the hop alpha acids in some hop varieties will have deteriorated up to 50% in 6 months. But let's look at the theory all ...


2

You want the fraction that you add to have the same OG as the rest of the batch. In your case its one, its simple, you want one gallon at 1.065. I see DME is 45 points per gallon per pound, so : 65 = 45 * X (where X = pounds of DME). X = 65/45 = 1.44 lbs of DME In general terms, the formula would be (OG /Points ) * V (where v = volume to be added in ...


2

I am primarily a one-gallon brewer. I have never adjusted a recipe, so I can't answer the question on AAUs. But I can tell you from experience that you can "scale" dry yeast on pretty much a linear basis. My method: I use the Mr. Malty Pitching Rate Calculator, and then use this $6 digital scale to weigh the dry yeast. I overpitch slightly from Mr. ...


1

For adding things to finished beers it's not too hard. Our local micro does one keg every week of different things that they add to their normal brews. (coffee/vanilla porter, double dry hopped IPA, mango pale ale, tart cherry brown, etc). Most breweries also have a pilot system that's one or two barrels (31 or 72 gallons) that they use for testing recipes ...


1

It very much depends upon how you want to affect the taste - in particular where in the brewing process that change has to happen. Changes in the grist, mash, boil affect the entire batch. Changes in fermentation depends upon how many fermentors the brewery has. Finally there is changes in packaging. But even if your change could be delayed all the way ...


1

The calculation is pretty simple, I think. (Original Point of Gravity) * (boil volume / total volume) = (new points of gravity) 60 * (3.5/4) = 52.5 Predicted SG after dilution, therefore is 1.0525 You should also be aware that with partial boils, your hop utilization will be lower than if you were boiling all the wort. See Palmer's How to Brew.


1

You can work it out by using gravity points. The final gravity is your current gravity (in points) x original volume / new volume. Gravity points is the gravity, but without the leading 1. For example, .060 (original gravity) x 3.5 (original volume) / 4 (new volume) = .0525, or a specific gravity of 1.0525. So your final gravity after topping up to 4 ...


1

In my experience things scale linearly in the homebrew range fairly well. Certainly, malts and sugars do. I have taken 5 gallon (even 3 gallon) recipes up to 15 gallons and done everything linearly. For my palate I couldn't taste any dramatic differences with the hops. However on larger scales of 3bbl systems to 10+bbl systems its more of an issue it ...



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