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Recipe: Grape Juice Yeast Making wine is more about process than recipe. With the exception of quality ingredients. Standard table grapes don't really make decent wine. This becomes incredibly apparent when you actually taste the juice from a true wine grape. I've dabbled in some wine making all from kits of different grape musts. When you taste the ...


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Are you really looking for body when you say the flavor was empty? You may need a little acid blend in the final product to brighten the flavors. Cider as a beverage is normally pretty low on body. Next time I'd try an English Ale yeast which will attenuate slightly less, leaving you some natural apple sweetness. At packaging you can add in a little acid ...


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'Do you think this will work with most recipes?' I think it will. The thing about intentionally stronger flavors is that they tend to mask other unwanted flavors that develop over time. Precisely why brewing a light beer (say, a Helles) can be so difficult; every little flaw will come through, having no strong flavor to hide it. '...add more hops, ...


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Adding to @FranklinPCombs's answer, if you have a CO2 canister, prefill your bottles with CO2 before filling them. That will guarantee that the head space contains no free oxygen and might buy you a little more shelf life.


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You've covered most the bases so without going into too much "why" here are some suggestions. The Why The key to light body sweetness are simple sugars (monosaccharides) but these are the easiest for yeast to eat. Larger molecule, harder to ferment sugars impart a cloying body and a slick mouthfeel. Suggestions Underattenuation. Stop fermentation ...


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First off you are not crazy, adding fruit to alcoholic beverages is an age old process. You have a few options, you can add the peaches to the secondary, minus the syrup. If the peaches are straight from a can they will have been pasteurized so you can add them straight in if you wish. You may want to freeze them first to break down cell walls and extract ...


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You'd want to do it as a late-addition fermentable. From the FAQ late addition entry: "Use this to exclude the fermentable from the estimated boil gravity used in the calculator." This means you'll have the right gravity for bittering calculations during the boil, and the right post-boil gravity (reflecting the addition of sugar).


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This will give you the IBU and ABV you are looking for. To get the mouth feel you will have to play around with mash-in temps to try get the right proportions of un-fermentable sugars out. 4.5 kg 10lb Pale 2-Row (UK) Any Mash 38 2 °L 0.45 kg 1lb Chocolate (US) Any Mash 29 350 °L 0.45 kg 1lb Caramel/Crystal 60L ...


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For BJCP Info, I use BJCP 2015 Beersmith (lite or full) is a good tool (but I tend to do everything on the PC, so I do not use the app that much). The app allows for recipe formulation, logs and timers. Brew Timer is a life saver for letting you know when to do what. Easy to configure. The pre-warning function is one of the best features. Lastly, CvPad, ...


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You can make graff, or malted cider, as was already answered. Your other options are: Steep light crystal malt in juice to get sugars from it. Many (most?) are non fermentable. Especially malts like Carapils® by Weyermann or Cara Clair by Castlemalting are developed to provide body, but not much else. Experiment with different kinds of apples, they ...


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Malted Cider all the way. Basically brew a light beer wort to same gravity of juice then blend the juice and wort 50/50, ferment with a clean ale yeast like California Ale yeast. That's the gist of it. Complete instructions are just a Google away.


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Depends on what you're trying to do. All grain varieties that do not need a mash step to help convert them can be steeped. I have steeped many a variety to make different beers. If I had two recipes that were very close in gravity and use the same base malt, I have made enough base malt wort to cover both brews, then split the wort and steeped the ...


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Basically any roasted malt have little to no enzymes from the heat in processing the malt and have already had thier sugars converted internally from enzymes. Mashing them does nothing special for them. So steeping crystal, carmel, roasted, carapils and carafoam can give the same results as adding them to the mash. Possibly even better results given the ...


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I've done the Morebeer Irish Red Ale kit. Was very simular to a couple commercial examples noted in bjcp 2015 . Here's the recipe for 5gal. 10lb 2-Row 1lb Crystal 120L 8oz Abbey 8oz Caramunich 2oz Black Roasted 2oz Special B 1.5oz northern brewer 60min 2oz Willamette 1min WLP004 Irish Ale Yeast


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My friend has tried this with Concord grapes and it was okay. The recipe he used was on this page: "https://www.baderbrewing.com/content/how-make-wine-concord-table-grapes" Good luck!


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I tried once to make a small quantity of wine from grapes I found in a grocery store. I had big hopes because they got a type of grapes that looked a lot like wine grapes (very dark and small). Even thought my process was good (already made wine from wine grapes), the end result was not good. So that means the grapes really need to be wine grapes. Make an ...


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Try adding a little bit of salt. Not enough to make it noticeably salty, just enough to change the flavour slightly, it can be perceived as sweetness (it may vary from person to person so not a great option for competition brewing). You can try this with a glass of ready to drink beer so the effort is pretty minimal.


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Use a lower attenuating yeast would be my first suggestion; leaving more sugar for you to taste. What yeast are you currently brewing with?


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Well for starters that is still a very dark malt 225L. It's marketed to give more 'black' flavor with less color. But could easily go really dark if overdosed. Castle recommends up to 5% of grist for porters and stouts. If your color target is 'red' you need to keep in the 18-28 SRM area. This would be a very small addition of this malt 1% or so. Edit: ...


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The most important things for a beer to have a long shelf life is the quality of the beer to start with. Having a flawless beer will have nothing to hide and will age much better. One of the most common problems with hoppy beers is they cover a lot if sins, but as the hops fade they reveal the off flavors that were there all a long. Diacetyl is at the top ...


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Here are a few recipes: http://www.wine-making-guides.com/elderberry_wine.html I would stick with there rough guide of 3lb/gal, and I would use some sugar but if you don't want to add sugars then you are likely to be using about 5lb of berries and 2-3lb of raisins per gallon. I would also freeze the raisins to break the cell walls and release the flavour ...


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Keep in mind that Vienna malt needs to be mashed. Although if you steep it for 45-60 min. at about 150F, that will be pretty much the same as mashing. Also, amber extract will have crystal and other malts already added to it. I'd recommend using the lightest extract you can find, preferably dry, then add your own specialty malts.


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I'd get rid of everything where you don't know why it's in the recipe. As a beginning brewer, I try to keep my ingredients to a bare minimum (1 lme/dme, 1 steeping grain, 1 hop, 1 yeast) when making my own recipes (ok, I made a triple-hop ale but the hops I stole from Duvel so that doesn't count). Also, I "develop" my recipes on a site with a built-in ...


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On my phone the only 3 beer-related apps I have installed are: Jomebrew Beer Stats and Conversions I grabbed this primarily to convert Brix to SG because my refractometer is in Brix. The interface isn't great, but its a quick simple app for doing some basic conversions. It will also take OG and SG and give you ABV and attenuation. It also does have a timer ...


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Current BJCP guidelines have Black IPA under Specialty IPA category. And it does have difference with American stout and porters defined: Not as roasty burnt as American stouts and porters, and with less body and increased smoothness and drinkability. That's official now. Basically this answer is still true, only more canonical source became available. ...



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