Hot answers tagged

4

Depend on a lot of factors. If it was in fermenter only two weeks, one or two more should not hurt. For light beers, under 6% ABV, I never kept them over a month. But I do have few fermenters 3 or 4 weeks old now, waiting to be bottled somewhere next week. Oldest is strongest, of course. For big beers, it was few months between pitch and bottling, and dang, ...


3

From my experience, unless you are trying to stop/stun an active fermentation, you should not rack until your primary fermentation is either done or mostly done. If you racked too early, then there may not be enough yeast left to finish cleanly in a reasonable time, which could lead to yeast stress, a stalled ferment, or a very sluggish finish. You'll need a ...


3

Some widely respected people advise against it, like: Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary Whilst it might be true, in some cases, it is not true in case of strong stuff, stuff that will stay in fermenter long time. See wine resources - for yeast wine with nutrient is not so different than wort. And even if this particular part, this one ...


3

I just finished a nut brown: OG:51 FG:10. Left it on the primary yeast cake for three weeks and it turned out great. Lots of people are suggesting no secondary these days, and a little longer in the primary. So, in answer to your question: let it rest while you rest. It'll be just fine.


2

Gratz on your second brew! This is just speculation from the limited info. Detailed steps and ingredients will help in the future. If there is actual liquid volume missing from the fermentor, then it left in the form of foam out the airlock or someone drank it. If there's no mess, then the later Here are some common causes of large beer stealing trub beds....


1

It's probably as safe as anything in a sanitary environment, though if I'm understanding you correctly it means another, however small, potential window of exposure to dangerous microbes since you're racking twice. I've reused yeast a few times to no ill effect, but a lot of literature advises against doing it more than that. It also sounds like more work ...


1

The top layer being clear is indeed and indicator that the rest will likely drop as sediment. However because it is so fine and probably still in suspension in part due to Brownian motion, you need to be sure the Demi-John is undisturbed. Put it on a surface that doesn't shake as you walk past. Don't keep checking it all the time. Just let it be. In the end ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible