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4

Yes, is is a problem. After primary fermentation, one of the most important staling agents your homebrew will face is oxygen. Pouring will almost guarantee the introduction of oxygen, whereas siphoning minimizes it.


4

You can use the pressure from fermentation to transfer from the fermenter to a serving keg. First, you'll want a spunding valve on the fermenter to control the pressure by releasing gas after the target pressure has been reached. When fermentation is complete, pressurize the serving keg with CO2 to slightly less pressure than what's showing on the ...


4

I think what will end up happening is something likeā€¦ After lag and reproduction, the yeast will start to ferment, and pressure will build up on the fermenting corny. This will slowly push still-fermenting wort into the second carboy, though perhaps following some of the trub that will have settled out first. At some point, the two cornys will reach an ...


2

No reason why not. It's just cider. Though the lees will give you some weird flavors. And bad gas.


2

I see a potential problem in that as the first waves of beer flow out into the secondary keg, they aren't yet done fermenting. So its like you're racking some of the beer to secondary on the very first day of fermenation. I would worry that this would shock the yeast somehow in the secondary keg and you'd get a stalled out fermentation there. Furthermore, ...


2

Its best to make a great wheat beer and mix it in the glass. That's how its done traditionally and you can make it to suit your taste that day. Just because our American commercialized culture is putting them in the same bottle doesn't mean its the best way to do it. They have access to more tools than we do as homebrewers for controlling the post ...



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