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6

The March 809HS is the standard.


6

If the only purpose for the pump is draining the boil kettle, it might be wise to avoid the complexity (and one more thing to clean), because gravity will certainly work to transfer your wort to the fermentation vessel. You may find that there is an incomplete transfer of wort. The volume depends on how far the ball valve is from the bottom of the kettle ...


5

Do you really mean just a tee? I guess not, since there's not much benefit, and you'll just get lots of spilled wort! I'm guessing you mean a tee, plus an attached valve - affectionately known as a "burper valve", which can help rid trapped air from the pump. When the liquid first flows through the pump, it displaces the air, which can become trapped in ...


4

Agree on the March pump. The 809 HS is a great pump. It is easy to build an intake and output for it to help control the flow speed. You should also add an air bleed valve to the output side so that you can help gravity by letting the air out of your output line. Here's a link to a photo of my pump with plumbing. The input should be on the bottom so ...


3

If you plan to consume all of the contents of the keg within a couple of days to a week, this may be a possibility. Using oxygen to tap a keg of beer causes the beer to stale exponentially quicker than regular CO2, even more so in cold temperatures. I would advise against doing this unless you plan to have it all drank in one sitting at a party. Depending ...


3

The march pumps, assuming you're talking about the usual 805/815 pump, produce about 5psi maximum. The hoses don't flail about uncontrollably at that pressure, so they can be used (with caution) with the out end unteathered. I'm also assuming you plan to fill the kettle using the pump, rather than drain it. When I first built my brewery, I used to simply ...


3

Not much to add to mdma's very nice answer. The first time you get cavitation in your pump and lose prime, you will most definitely appreciate having the 'burper' valve to re-prime. Just open it up, let some liquid flow, then continue pumping away. I thought I'd add a few pictures of my own tees for reference. I used an acetal plastic gate valve on this ...


2

It will work fine by gravity. But the amount of wort you get out of the kettle is dependent upon the geometry of your pots bottom, and how your pick up tube is positioned in the pot.


2

I used a racking cane and gravity for 3 years worth of brewing, and it worked just fine. I don't see any reason you couldn't rely on gravity. It will be slower than a pump, but you're looking at 3-5 minutes to fill the fermentor, rather than less than 1 with a pump, basically.


2

I know several brewers who use a pump made by March. You can find them at many of the larger homebrew shops.


2

I use a March 809 HS and I love it. You install a ball valve on the out put to control flow rate. While it's not self priming, it requires very little height differential to get it primed.


2

Two ideas for you, with the caveat that I have no direct experience with pumps + BIAB, I'm just spitballing here. A false bottom will keep your bag off the kettle floor and away from the outlet. I couldn't easily see if MoreBeer makes a false bottom to fit that particular kettle, but there's probably a generic product that will fit reasonably well. A ...


2

You could make your own. A little googling will turn up several interesting DIY peristaltic pumps specifically designed for homebrewing. Here is a particularly interesting one that also has a pretty good discussion thread to go along with it: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/cake-pan-skateboard-wheel-bike-brakes-homemade-peristaltic-pump-279120/


2

FWIW, I don't use a T on the outlet side to prime. My system isn't hard plumbed where I need it. The outlet hose I have on the pump serves as the air escape. The reason to use a venting T is when the outlet end of from the pump is connected to plumbing (or hoses) that goes into fluid. The fluid tends to create just enough back pressure that the pump ...


1

While sugar solution is thicker than water, it's only by 4-10% for a typical brew, so I doubt that is your problem. It's more likely a partial blockage or a connection that is letting in air. One other thing that can cause a reduced flow - it's important to get all air out of the tubes that run from the kettle into the pump. I have the pump placed below ...


1

You will want something to strain your hop material before going into the pump and chiller … either a hop spider or a hopback-like device. You could conceivably use gravity to run the wort from the kettle through the chiller, but … this is slow (not necessarily a problem, as you'll want a relatively slow wort flow) and (somewhat) assumes you will chill in a ...



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