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9

There are several issues with a large propane burner used indoors (or natural gas/methane for that matter - propane is derived from NG, in fact). The issues with a large open flame on a mobile base inside your house are obvious. The burner would have to be situated at a distance from any combustibles, similar to safely installing a wood stove. Then ...


7

Commercial micro-brewers can bring 10 barrels (2880 pints) to the boil in 30 - 45 mins using a gas jet of flame in a pipe that passes through the kettle - can't remember the technical name for it. What they do do, though, is recirculate the wort whilst they heat. This will keep it on the move and prevent hot spots/scorching/caramelising and any other ...


6

http://www.blichmannengineering.com/brew_stand/brewstand_modular.html If you follow that link, and click on burner data, you can get the manufacturer's description of what makes theirs better. From their description, and what I can see, you're looking at: Faster boil time Possibly better designed stand (don't know the other model) From their numbers, ...


6

I recommend listening to John Blichmann's appearance on Brew Strong where they talk about burners and boil. Obviously the man is proud of his product, so he talks it up. But his knowledge and enthusiasm for home brewing is what really sold me on his equipment. I settled on buying a Blichmann burner because I hate buying equipment twice. I'd rather spend a ...


4

If your additional 1.12 gallons of 70F water can be considered free of heating time and cost, then we just need to compare the different quantities of water being heated and the temperature they are raised through: 2.82 gallons from 70F to 212F = 2.82 * (212-70) = 400.44 galF 4 gallons from 70F to 170F = 4 * (170-100) = 400 galF (I'm using non-standard ...


4

The original Brutus build is not electric, but natural gas, so that may in fact be a good place to start, especially for seeing how the flame control works (temp controller + pilot and valve.) The write-ups are very good and many have successfully built clones. A new spring is needed on the honeywell valves to convert from natural gas to propane - this blog ...


3

Propane indoors would indeed be a bad idea. What about switching to an electric based method like a heatstick? The heatsticks are a great option if you have GFI outlets, or can install them. With two of them (plugged into different circuits) you should be able to boil quite quickly.


3

If I'm reading these figures correctly, Natural Gas contains 23,000 BTUs/Lb. vs Propane's 21,000 BTUs/Lb. How the propane council baka references comes up with their numbers likely has more to do with marketing spin (measuring energy density by volume, not mass) than science, I suspect. How effectively you can utilize that and what it's going to cost you ...


2

I bought a turkey burner and then bought a Blichmann after realizing how flimsy the turkey fryer was. When I got the Blichmann, the comparison was obvious. Here's a picture of both the cheap turkey fryer and the Blichmann side by side: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jwynia/5333294931/ The Blichmann is considerably more sturdy than any of the turkey fryers ...


2

I am a single burner all grain brewer so I figured I would share my process. Right now I have a 8.5g polarware kettle w/ thermometer and ball valve, a 4g pot for an HLT and a 10g igloo mash tun. My typical setup is heat the mash water in my polarware kettle, and then mash in to the cooler. Then, depending on how much sparge water (I batch sparge) I either ...


1

I have a Blichmann burner with the leg extensions, and to that point, you may need a platform to set it on to do all of your gravity feeding. I gravity feed from the kettle on the burner to the mash tun (48qt cooler sitting on top of a 5 gallon bucket), and usually have to lift the kettle and pour out the last gallon or so when the mash tun is full, ...


1

If you want to brew 10 gallons, I recommend the Blichmann pot, although I would go with the 20 gallon size - 15 gallons is on the small side for a boil kettle for 10 gallon batches. Here's why. For a 10 gallon batch, you'll typically want about 11.5-12 gallons at the end of boiling, to account for trub, losses to chiller, losses in the fermentor, hydrometer ...


1

I can't speak to any of the Blichmann equipment, as I have none. With that said, I also run a single burner set up, and I would highly recommend you change the title of your 5 gallon cooler from 'mash tun' to 'hot liquor tank'. That is what I use and it works quite well...plus you have this already. So you heat your mash water on the burner and mash in with ...


1

It's entirely subjective. When I upgraded from my 5G pot to a 10G and started doing full-volume boils, I replaced my turkey fryer with an "outdoor cooker" burner. I can get 6.5G of water to a boil about as fast as I could 3.5G with my old pot/burner, and my new burner has a wind screen so I don't have to relight if the wind kicks up. I'm sure my new ...


1

Its probably worth it if you wanted to eventually upgrade to the blichmann brewing stand, to keep it all modular. If you don't plan to doing a whole stand eventually, the burners from HomeDepot type sources work just fine. And BTUs for any burner you see is dictated more from the regulator on the tank and not the burners configuration itself. Its also ...


1

Aluminum is cheaper and easier to find, copper is a better conducter of heat. So I would probably go with aluminum and I would look at the Home Depot or Loews. They should have some sheets there. Then I would cut it to size and throw my pot on it the next time I brewed. Worst case, you can only find five inch wide strips, I would cut the strip into the ...



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