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8

You can't fix Sh!t beer. Invest your time and money on re-brewing it the way you wanted to brew it. Pouring the beer into a fermentor will only oxidize it and make it worse, regardless of what you want to add to it. If you are really hell bent on keeping it, go to your favorite bottle shop and buy the strongest double IPA you can get. And blend to taste ...


6

IMHO, play this batch to its strengths, e.g. cooking ribs or perhaps serving on nitrogen, or mix at pouring time with another beer. You could try salvaging the batch by blending, but if it still doesn't turn out as you like, then you will have wasted two batches. Since it's already bottled, that would deter me away from trying to rescue it, and instead I ...


6

No need to worry! The priming sugar will up the alcohol content by a marginal amount but you probably won't notice. It is definitely a good idea to let the yeast take care of the extra priming sugar, although this shouldn't take too long, I'd say wait a couple days and then re-prime and bottle. Priming sugar is a pretty simple sugar so it should ferment ...


5

A lot of good info here, so I'll just throw in my $0.02 Your techniques when starting out will usually not be optimal. Part of this is because the instructions supplied by kits and shop owners are usually oversimplified to make the process less intimidating. That being said, you usually still wind up making beer, it may just not be the best beer :) The ...


5

You probably just haven't waited long enough yet. Make sure the lid is on tight and wait another 24 hours. Dry yeast and the first time experience tends to take a while for things to start perking. Just be patient. Hot water can be too hot, but as long as it is under 100F you should be OK. Some of the yeast probably didn't survive the shock, but you ...


4

The only way to be sure if it is fermenting is to check the gravity. If the airlock is not bubbling it could just mean the seal on the bucket lid (or stopper) is not sealed air-tight. It may also need more time before it kicks up. The only time I fermented wine, it was a much less active-looking fermentation than beer. I'd say wait a day or two, then ...


3

Did I make a mistake somewhere? Possible reasons for no bubbles: a) The lead of the fermenter is not completely closed, or the airlock not perfectly attached, thus air gets out from somewhere else. b)When you say your poured the yeast into "hot water", how hot was it? If you used water over 80-85 degrees F you could have killed your yeast. How ...


2

Its possible that you haven't given the beer enough time to settle out. A hydrometer reading of 1.010 may indicate that fermentation is done. But there is likely still plenty of stuff still settling out. I'd recommend moving the fermentor to someplace cooler than fermentation temps, as this will help promote the settling of stuff. If you have a secondary ...


2

You can use a smaller diameter tubing in most applications. If you dip the tubing in hot water it will allow it to stretch some more and you can get a tight fit on certain items. Next clamps of some sort for certain applications can help as well. But they create an extra step when you need or want to remove the tuning. (I removed the tubing from my racking ...


2

I have never tried this personally, however I remember an episode of "Basic Brewing Radio" titled "Hopped Vodka" or something like that. This guy used Vodka (and a specific procedure) to basically make a hop extract. The hops were soaked in the Vodka and a couple different distillation procedures were used (freezing and removing water, and something else) ...


1

The best way to tell for sure is to wait. You can't fix the problem if you have one. You just finished primary fermentation: it's not uncommon to have left over yeast all over the place; you haven't cleared your wine yet, whether with time or chemicals. You can also see many images of others' infections via Google images. If the flowers are just starting to ...


1

In my first few batches I quickly learned that something doesn't go exactly right in almost every batch. Should be fine unless you have reason to believe you may have poisoned the beer. In my few short years homebrewing, I have yet to toss a batch or make one that is totally undrinkable. You've learned two important lessons. 1. Be careful with your ...


1

Since the hydrometer only broke in the sanitizing bucket, you're almost certainly fine. Boiling over, from my understanding, is going to happen to everyone from time to time. As far as the hydrometer, if you didn't get an OG calculation, you can always go to beercalculus.com and enter the recipe you used. It will give you an approximate OG based on your ...


1

I'm in line with brewchez and mdma when they say not to rescue the beer especially since it has already been bottled. Everything tends to get better with time, so cellar the beer, forget about it and revisit it around November or December and see if it's gotten any better. If not, I'll give you my address (I'm one state over) and you can ship it to me. NEVER ...


1

There are some good related answers. Use the search. Here are two to get you started. Cleaner wort out of the Kettle How do you filter at home?


1

I agree about the bucket seal and a gravity reading, but if you have one active fermentation and one inactive, I would decant the active wine into a secondary, and siphon the other onto the yeast cake in the active primary. The fermentation would pick up faster than repitching since the yeast is fully active and dispersed in an identical solution. Wine ...



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