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15

This often happens for 1 of 2 reasons: bottling too soon, as @LoganGoesPlaces suggests. This means the yeast has not finished consuming the sugar in the beer and continues to do so in the bottle which releases more CO2 than the bottle can handle. You can tell if the fermentation is complete by measuring the Original Gravity and the Final Gravity and ...


10

With a beer that strong, you probably should have repitched at bottling. There are several factors that the yeast must fight in this situation, including: high alcohol strength - almost 10% ABV cool temperature - the bottom two degrees of the yeast's fermentation range long settling time - six weeks There's good news, though. That strain should be able ...


9

For a 12-oz bottle, I fill it all the way to the top with the bottling wand. The amount of liquid displaced when I pull out the wand is about 2 inches from the top. For larger 22-oz bottles, I fill it a little less, but still keep approximately 2 inches of head space from the top. I've never had a problem with the lids blowing off or low carbonation. ...


8

If you follow the same procedures for the malt extract and lactose that you do for the priming sugar you will be good. The boiled water acts as a pasteurizer for the sugar and malt extract to eliminate any bacteria.


8

On my first batch I had the following issue: knowing very little about brewing and even more about what "fermentable sugars" are, I primed used raw cane sugar I had first burned into caramel, for some extra taste. The result, of course, was a beer with almost no alcohol. I discussed this with more experienced home brewers and what they advised me was the ...


7

Muntons makes a product called "Carb Tabs". I am pretty sure they are what you are talking about. For your sake, DO NOT use them. From my experience, they do not dissolve all of the way and you are stuck with 2-3 little white chunks in your beer. This particular brew still had chunks in it 8 months after bottling. When this happened I did some research ...


6

Bottles usually explode either because of bottling too soon before fermentation is complete or because too much primer was used.


6

I have done the same, resulting in a couple of cracked bottles from the pressure a couple of weeks after bottling. I loosened the caps (just barely enough to release the pressure), let them sit for a few minutes and then resealed the caps. I did this twice over a couple of weeks. This is possibly a bit dodgy in terms of sanitisation, but I had no issues ...


6

If the latter batch had about half of the bottles uncarbonated like you mentioned "but the other has about half the bottles with no activity" then it sounds like the sugar solution and beer did not get mixed thoroughly and therefore the ones that didnt have enough of the sugar solution did not carbonate. To avoid this I put the sugar solution in my bottling ...


6

No need to worry! The priming sugar will up the alcohol content by a marginal amount but you probably won't notice. It is definitely a good idea to let the yeast take care of the extra priming sugar, although this shouldn't take too long, I'd say wait a couple days and then re-prime and bottle. Priming sugar is a pretty simple sugar so it should ferment ...


6

Based on my experience and priming experiments I've done, honey adds no flavor when used as priming. You only a tiny bit and it ferments out leaving no flavor behind. In addition, since the fermentability is variable, you don't really know what your carbonation level will be.


6

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


5

As far as I understand things, the yeast won't go through a serious growth phase in the bottle. The pressure and alcohol make for a harsh environment, and you shouldn't be using enough yeast to really consume any oxygen that you would add. At this point, you really want to avoid oxygenation, so that you limit oxidation flavors in the beer. Thus, you ...


5

I recommend getting a bottling bucket and wand. It will make the operation a little easier. You need to stir in your priming sugar to get it homogenous throughout the beer. Otherwise, some bottles will be more carbed than others. Mixing in the fermenter will stir up all that sediment in the bottom, so that's no good. Secondly, yes trying to just bottle ...


5

I experimented many years ago with splitting a batch and priming with corn sugar, table sugar, DME, maple syrup, honey, force carbing and a couple others I can't recall. I calculated to try to make sure all would have the same level of carbonation. After 2 months, I held a blind tasting. No one could distinguish one from the other or had a preference for ...


5

You will need to add priming sugar if the beer has reached its terminal gravity with the yeast being used. In this example, despite the 80% attenuation the remaining 20% is not usually fermentable sugars. Its comprised of protein, dextrans and other molecules in solution that are largely ignored by your primary yeast strain. Lastly, reported attenuation ...


4

The space in the bottle is important, but don't forget about your priming sugar amounts and bottling temps. If you find your beer is undercarbed, try to rotate the bottles, swirl them gently while they are upside down and raise the ambient temperature up. You'll see better results.


4

I think trying to reseal caps results in leaky seals. If you drink them fast enough maybe you don't notice that over time they lose their carbonation to an extent. I'd plan on carefully monitoring the carb level by sampling the beers each day. Then just store them in a cold fridge to stop the process. Seeing how it seems like a small batch fridge space ...


4

60f shouldn't be cold enough to kill the yeast, but cold enough to slow it down drastically. If the beer tasted fine prior to bottling, it should be OK after a couple of weeks at 70f.


4

Fructose is fully fermentable. Assuming the fructose is completely dry, containing no moisture - as is the case with granulated table sugar, which is also fully fermentable - then you can use it in the same quantity as you would table sugar (sucrose). In fact, save your money; use table sugar for priming.


4

No, if your beer is ready to drink, you can go ahead and hook up your gas and then start force-carbing. You can let it sit for a few days at carbing pressure or you can give it a kick start by hooking your gas line up to your OUT port on your keg and gently rolling it back and forth on your lap. I prefer to give it time in the keg as it helps you have nice ...


4

A certain amount of sugar makes a certain amount of CO2 the size of the container it goes into doesn't matter all that much. There tends to be a slight change in sugar when priming an entire keg at once, but I haven't always found that to be necessarily crucial. Futhermore, the scale up from a 12oz bottle to a 6L TAD is not as large of a scale from the ...


4

Priming sugar amount depends on carbonation level, that is Total carbonation = CO2 already in beer + CO2 from priming sugar CO2 already in beer depends on the temperature you bottle at CO2 from priming sugar is proportional to amount of sugar used Total carbonation is expressed in volumes (Vol) and depends on beer style. You can find all this taken ...


4

Using sorbate is the only way to have a chance of stropping fermentation and even that can be unreliable. If you keg rather than bottle, attempting to stop fermentation is less dangerous since a keg won't explode like bottles can. As has been said, the real solution is to brew the beer you want to drink.


4

I don't really agree with your pro and con list. Assuming you're able to calculate the right amount of sweet apple cider to add for priming, and this should be fairly simple arithmetic based on brix and volume, there's no real difference compared to adding table sugar or dextrose. I'd suggest you keep things simple and use sugar for priming. If you're ...


3

I assume by krausening you mean priming with gyle. I've tried it and found no advantages to it whatsoever. It's a pain to calculate the right amount and depending on the fermentability of the wort you can get varying carb levels. I've tried priming with a number of things and always come back to sugar (corn or table) as the most reliable and neutral ...


3

I have done tests using corn sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, honey, DME and force carbing, then doing blind tastings. Not a single taster could tell which was which nor expressed a preference for one over another. The other problem with priming with DME is that you don't know how fermentable DME is, so you have no way of accurately priming your beer. ...


3

I always boil and cool my priming sugar solution and add half of it to the bottling bucket. I rack about half of the beer into the bucket and then add the rest of the priming solution as the remainder of the beer is flowing. Afterwards, I use a [sanitized] brew spoon to very gently stir the beer in the bottling bucket. As long as you avoid churning it and ...


3

The two methods I've used have been: Put the sugar solution in the bottling bucket, then rack carefully to that from the fermenter. The movement of the incoming beer is plenty to mix in the sugar. Siphon or carefully pour the sugar solution on top of the beer, then stir it with a sanitized spoon very slowly for ~5 minutes.


3

You need to prime all your beers that you plan to carbonate in the bottle. An alternative to this would be to bottle prior to the ferment finishing and let the residual activity carbonate the beer. This technique is not advisable for the math challenged and novice brewer. It requires careful attention to the fermentation and a lot of experience with the ...



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