Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

Corn syrup Regular olde sucrose Malt extract Brown sugar if you're desperate See A Primer on Priming and How to Brew.


9

You will need to add the right amount of priming sugar to carbonate the beer in the bottles. There are lots of online priming sugar calculators. In theory, you could bottle the beer before fermentation had completed, and let the remaining sugars carbonate the beer, but this would be very hard to do right. If you bottle with too much residual sugar, your ...


8

This does sound like dangerous advice, unless they also tell you at which specific gravity to start bottling. If you bottle to early, you could get bottle bombs, and too late you get flat beer. If you bottle at a SG close to the expected final gravity then you can reduce the chances of the above from happening. If you were going to use priming, sugar, for ...


8

If you follow the same procedures for the malt extract and lactose that you do for the priming sugar you will be good. The boiled water acts as a pasteurizer for the sugar and malt extract to eliminate any bacteria.


7

How much priming? See A Primer on Priming and How to Brew. Add sugar like you normally would. Prepwork Follow your normal keg prep work. Clean and sanitize the keg. Inspect the gaskets and seals. Purging it is not necessary, but will not hurt. General thoughts I do basically the same thing. My beer ferments for a few weeks, then I transfer it to ...


6

I have done the same, resulting in a couple of cracked bottles from the pressure a couple of weeks after bottling. I loosened the caps (just barely enough to release the pressure), let them sit for a few minutes and then resealed the caps. I did this twice over a couple of weeks. This is possibly a bit dodgy in terms of sanitisation, but I had no issues ...


6

I'd be cautious of using corn syrup, it usually has salt and sometimes vanilla flavoring in it in addition to the actual corn sugar syrup. Go with regular table sugar (sucrose), or malt extract if you have some to spare. KOTMF has got a handy calculator to help you determine how much you should use: http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php


6

Based on my experience and priming experiments I've done, honey adds no flavor when used as priming. You only a tiny bit and it ferments out leaving no flavor behind. In addition, since the fermentability is variable, you don't really know what your carbonation level will be.


6

Most of the priming sugar available at homebrew shops is finely granulated dextrose/corn sugar. It can be confused with; but it is not confectioners sugar. Most confectioners sugar contains anti-caking agents in it, like cornstarch or silicates. Neither of these are necessarily good for your beer. I stopped buying "priming sugar" from the shop and ...


5

I experimented many years ago with splitting a batch and priming with corn sugar, table sugar, DME, maple syrup, honey, force carbing and a couple others I can't recall. I calculated to try to make sure all would have the same level of carbonation. After 2 months, I held a blind tasting. No one could distinguish one from the other or had a preference for ...


5

No I just dump. [Edit, thanks to TinCoyote] When asking these sort of questions I always think about the proportions (or dilution rate). Pitching a few tens of ml into 19,000 ml won't even register on your tongue.


5

Overview You carbonate partially filled bottles as if the bottle were full of beer, so if you have 1 liter of beer in a 3 liter bottle, you carbonate as if you had 3 liters of beer. Here's why. The amount of carbonation is measured by the equivalent volumes of CO2 dissolved in the beer. So a beer carbonated to 2.5 vols, has 2.5 times the volume of CO2 ...


5

If you follow a process like this, you won't be far off: Dilute the syrup to create a 10% solution. E.g. add 10g of syrup to 90g of water and stir well. Take the specific gravity of the 10% solution, e.g. 1.030 Express this as a fraction of a 10% solution of sucrose, which has specific gravity 1.040. So, our example of 1.030 is .75 the gravity of a 10% ...


4

Fructose is fully fermentable. Assuming the fructose is completely dry, containing no moisture - as is the case with granulated table sugar, which is also fully fermentable - then you can use it in the same quantity as you would table sugar (sucrose). In fact, save your money; use table sugar for priming.


4

A certain amount of sugar makes a certain amount of CO2 the size of the container it goes into doesn't matter all that much. There tends to be a slight change in sugar when priming an entire keg at once, but I haven't always found that to be necessarily crucial. Futhermore, the scale up from a 12oz bottle to a 6L TAD is not as large of a scale from the ...


4

I think trying to reseal caps results in leaky seals. If you drink them fast enough maybe you don't notice that over time they lose their carbonation to an extent. I'd plan on carefully monitoring the carb level by sampling the beers each day. Then just store them in a cold fridge to stop the process. Seeing how it seems like a small batch fridge space ...


4

I wouldn't have even cared on looking the best before date and would have just used it, but your question is intriguing! I found an article claiming that most sugars don't actually go bad. Dry Malt Extract and Liquid Malt Extract on the other hand are better used fresh from what I have been reading. Not sure exactly what goes bad there though (perhaps ...


4

If all your bottles are overcarbonated my guess would be that you didn't hit your terminal gravity and bottled too soon. I don't know yoour recipe but an FG of 1.014 seems a bit high to me with an 1.048 OG using wlp001. If some bottles are undercarbonated you probably didn't mix your priming sugar properly into the beer. Infected bottles usually have a ...


4

Given the time factor, and that it has lost it's body, I would bet on contamination here. While a white ring in the bottle is a typical indicator for contamination, it isn't a necessary factor. One other thing to try is to degass some of the beer by stirring/sloshing in a large container and then take a gravity reading. My guess is that it's below 1.007, ...


3

I have done tests using corn sugar, cane sugar, brown sugar, honey, DME and force carbing, then doing blind tastings. Not a single taster could tell which was which nor expressed a preference for one over another. The other problem with priming with DME is that you don't know how fermentable DME is, so you have no way of accurately priming your beer. ...


3

I think your best bet would be to ferment with your primary yeast as planned. Transfer to secondary. Pitching in the brett to finish of what residual and non fermentables it can. This might take a few months. Then I'd bottle as usual, maybe even adding a 1/4 packet of dried ale yeast to ensure you get carbonations. That way if it is possible to get a ...


3

You know that your mean potential FG is 1.012 (this is an example, when designing your batch you can predict your FG more or less). You can find the amount of priming sugar needed according to style and temperature from here: http://kotmf.com/tools/prime.php Now that you know the amount of priming sugar needed, all you have to do is the following: OG ...


3

In general, I'd say get more spoons for several reasons. First, the two sizes you have means that you will get the same number of volumes of CO2 in your beer, no matter the style. So your brewery will deliver, for instance, a stout and a saison that have the same carbonation level. And then the second, obvious reason is that you'll have a spoon sized to ...


3

It has to be pretty accurate, atleast within the general area. Priming a 500ml bottle with the same amount as an 750ml bottle will definately affect the outcome. That's 1.5 times as much sugar. But I don't see why you do it that way at all. When I prime my bottles, I weigh out an appropriate amount of sugar - say 150 grams for 25l. Then I get a deciliter ...


3

If it was me I would let the beer finish out completely. Till the gravity reading stabilizes at what it was specified in the recipe. Then I would use the information from Palmer's book to determine how much priming sugar to add: http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter11-4.html If you don't add priming sugar you most likely will end up with flat or ...


3

Absolutely unimportant until the malt extract is opened, within reason. "Within reason" being on the scale of years." For priming sugar, you've got almost nothing to worry about.


3

Bottle priming takes typically 2 weeks, depending upon temperature and yeast health. The bottles should initially be stored at room temperature so the yeast can produce CO2 from the priming sugar, which takes 2-3 days. If you opened the bottle then, you'd get a loud hiss and flat beer, since all the CO2 is in the headspace. After the CO2 is produced, it ...


3

I'm assuming you are meaning that you've primed AND carbonated in the barrel. Correct me if wrong. You can bottle already carbonated beer from a keg using counter pressure to reduce foaming. Our very own @joefish made a great video about the process he uses. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXhYmTlHH50. From a barrel may be more difficult being as you have ...


3

I have done this many times with a counter-pressure filler. I have also used the Blichmann Beer Gun with success, although I think it does lose a bit more carbonation than the CP-filler. OTOH, the Beer Gun is much easier to use. The key to success is to make sure everything is very cold: Put the bottles in a freezer and take them out 6 at a time as you are ...


3

A typical 20 liter batch uses around 120g of table sugar, or 6g per liter. One teaspoon of sugar is about 4.2g. So when you used 0.5tsp in 750ml that's 2.1/0.750 = 2.8 grams per liter, which is less than half the typical 6 grams per liter. For 1.5tsp in 1250ml, that's 1.5*4.2/1.25 = 5g/l so much closer, but still undercarbonated - it's quite hard to measure ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible