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3

The downside would be potential oxygenation of the beer, but "rousing" of yeast is a long-established practice. I'd suggest gentle swirling rather than shaking.


2

No, you will be fine. This question has been answered before here and here. On a personal note, I just bottled a batch last night that sat in the primary fermenter for six weeks, and it tasted very good. Incidentally, racking to a secondary vessel introduces a very small risk of oxidation or infection, and is unnecessary work unless (a) you plan to ...


2

If you plan to steep grains to make more wort, be sure to boil it to kill spoilage organisms and also to remove the oxygen. You could try steeping another 0.5lb of the blackprinz and 1lb of the black wheat might give more of the stronger roastiness you'd expect in a robust porter, but since both of these malts is huskless, you're not going to get some of ...


1

You can always open the lid and carefully take a quick look to see how it's going. Usually the sings of infection are bad smell and white mold spots on the surface. If you don't notice any of that you're good, you can also take a gravity test to see how the yeast is doing and compare it to the other batches...


1

It got warm, so the pressure inside the fermentor increased, forcing gas out through the airlock, which you notice as bubbles.


1

Don't panic. Taste the beer. If it tastes like beer, it's probably ok. If it doesn't taste like beer, but not bad, you can do a couple of things. ONE: do nothing, bottle it, and wait to see how it matures. TWO: drop 2-3 campden tablets to sterilize the beer, then prime and bottle. THREE: Pasteurize, then add a little more malt and repitch with some ...



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