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I wouldn't be too concerned by it but just be sure to keep up with the gravity reading to check for real progress. That's the surefire way to make sure your beer is doing what it's supposed to. Airlock activity isn't the only sign.


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Airlock activity is not the be-all end-all. You could have a bad seal on a bucket or on the airlock grommet itself. Give it a little time (3-4 days) then check the gravity. Gravity movement is really the only 100% reliable way to test if the yeast is working.


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Congratulations on your first brew, I used a similar kit for my first brew and was pretty nervous about the fermentation process as well. All of the bubbling is fine — it won't always be vigorous but at times can just be slow and steady. As long as the bubbles are there you know your beer is doing the right thing.


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Bubbles are a good thing slow or rapid just keep in a dark room temperature between 62-72 you should be fine..


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I got a little carried away here, so here's a quick summary. TL;DR: Your yeast was probably either A) nutrient starved, B) Fermenting at too high of a temperature, or C) a combination of both. Regardless of your temperature control situation, I think A (nutrition) is the most likely cuplrit here. While it's true that some yeast strains are more prone to ...


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Some yeast strains give sulfur smell during fermentation. That's perfectly normal. If it's in the air, it's no longer in your brew! The fact you can smell it so strongly indicates it is, literally, going away now. It comes from metabolism of sulfur amino-acids. Sooner they are degenerated and sulfur is released, the less chance it'll get released in the ...


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If I remeber correctly you have the 1 gal. glass carboy and ran a tube from the lid into a pot of sanitized solution. After the bubbling slowed the airlock was supposed to go on. What youre seeing is Krauzen - totally normal amd will sink to the bottom. You should be storing your fermentables in a dark place that stays around 60-70 F ...think cupboard or ...


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As the previous posters mention it sounds OK just a bit of a slow start. If after 48 hours you are still concerned, take a gravity reading and if it has not noticeably dropped, then re-pitch a new starter.


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Sounds like everything is doing fine. 8 hours of lag time isn't bad at all. Extra headspace has no effect on actual fermentation and little effect on air lock activity, though c02 does slightly fit in between molecules in air as it mixes, it's so small it's only a matter of note for novelty.


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Fermentation needs lots of oxygen. What I usually do in my 10 l batch is to shake my fermentation vat to add more oxygen to the wort before pitching the yeat and put the air lock on the vat. I assume you started your yeast before pitching it. I once did not do that and sprinkled the dry yeats over the wort as per instructions on the package, however, it ...



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