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14

...and after pitching yeast (6 hours), noticed yellow clusters of what I think was mold Mold isn't going to grow within 6 hours of chilling down the wort. What you saw was clumps of yeast from your pitch stuck to the sides of the fermentor or floating on top. Did you rehydrate your yeast (if using dry)? What I'm getting at is can mold cause ...


12

A lot of commercial breweries do that. Most that I know pitch a normal, or slightly larger, amount of yeast for the first batch. By the time the second is added, there has been enough yeast growth to accommodate it.


10

I don't know, but for the sake of peace of mind, I'd dump the batch if it was me. The primary concern should be the ingestion of a heavy metal, not bacteria. Wort/beer is acidic, and a quick internet search reveals that lead may partially dissolve in carbonated water and other acids, and that contact with food should be avoided. The answer probably depends ...


10

Assuming that your 1.004 was a typo, and you meant 1.040, you've gotten around 75% apparent attenuation, so the yeast are probably finished, and you should be able to bottle. Unfortunately, 26C is about 16C too warm for a lager, so you may have an odd tasting lager. It won't necessarily taste bad, but it won't match the style that you were attempting.


7

Do nothing. That lacing is the residue of the foamy, yeasty head (krausen) clinging to the sides of the jug. There's no need to reincorporate it. Just let the cider finish fermenting.


6

BE SURE to boil any water you add at this point to deoxygenate it. If you don't, the added water will oxidize your beer and promote faster staling.


6

There's a small risk that by removing the beer from the bulk of the yeast, your attenuation might be lower. That is, the beer might end up lower alcohol and sweeter than otherwise. However, as long as you pitched enough healthy yeast and the fermentation was vigorous, you're unlikely to see any problems. Don't do anything at this point. The beer should ...


6

You've made your bed of hops, now lay in it. Now is not the time to be messing about in your fermenter. Or, frankly, opening it up to take pictures of it. The beer is very susceptible to infection right now. Your massive dose of hops might be a little protective, but you can only get so much alpha acid in your beer, so you haven't made some super-immune ...


5

26C is about 79F. That is way too hot. I bet the brew finished while you were sleeping on the first night. Its ready to bottle, so go for it.


5

A healthy fermentation with a strong yeast will tend to produce a larger krausen. You're right about the strain of yeast being a big player, but the best thing you can do is increase your fermentor head space. In this case, the obvious answer is best: either use a larger carboy or smaller volume of wort. You can also get a little help by fermenting cooler ...


5

I believe it will be possible to add extra water to decrease the ABV but is it really necessary? If so I would get purified water and for a 43L batch add a few liters to decrease the ABV. Do this in the new carboy before racking the brew into it. If it was me I would leave it though. As mentioned by others without having the exact readings it is hard to say ...


5

This is a completely normal blow-off fermentation in a carboy. The krausen (in any ferment) will eventually subside and fall into the beer. As the krausen was pushed into the neck and walls of the carboy, some of it stuck to the sides. You don't need to transfer it. It generally won't fall off on its own, and you'll need to clean it off/out once you've ...


4

Assuming you have a glass carboy for secondary, I recommend going to secondary right now. Since the primary fermentation is done and it's reached it's final gravity, there is no harm in starting secondary early, and you need to have some sort of airlock to prevent infection. Siphon into the carboy and you should be able to dig around through the yeast and ...


4

Welcome to the club! Almost every brewer I know has dropped something in the fermenter at some point. I say leave it there. It will cause no off flavors (if the rubber wasn't inert it wouldn't have been used on the fermenter). At this point you're more likely to cause problems by trying to remove it than if you just left it where it is.


4

Most extract-based lager kits are sold with an ale yeast. This is because most home-brewers don't have the equipment to ferment at a consistent low temperature. You could check the kit to make sure, but it's almost certainly the case that your kit makes a light ale, not a lager. I've had good luck in the past with WYeast 2112 (California Lager, equivalent ...


4

I think that's entirely possible. At any rate, I wouldn't worry about it. I see nothing abnormal, and there's nothing you could do about it now anyway.


4

You pitched really warm - 30°C is well above what is recommended - you can expect a lot of fruitiness and maybe some stronger alcohol flavors. It takes many hours for 20 liters of beer to drop to ambient temps, plus as the yeast get started, they create heat, holding the temperature where it is or raising it. The temperature falling to 17°C could ...


4

Generally speaking, the amount of time for proper conditioning after completion of primary fermentation increases with the OG of the post-boil wort. It can also be dependent on beer style and personal taste. A low gravity (1.040's) ale can be ready in 2 weeks. A high gravity russian imperial stout can sometimes take 6 months to develop the flavors desired ...


4

No. If you wait an extended period of time you can get autolysis from yeast and get some off flavors. But it would be a lot longer. If I were you I would add the fruit to secondary. Boiling will only take away from the aroma and flavor of the fruit. They probably suggest this to avoid contamination. As long as you have good sanitation I wouldn't worry about ...


4

Temperature would be my first bet. You didn't mention what temperature you experienced during your primary fermentation. If your temperature was appropriate for the champagne yeast, then my next bet would be that your OG was not very high; therefore your yeast ate up what little sugar was present in a comparatively short time. Did you augment the bananas ...


4

The fermenter should not be full to the brim, there will be at least a couple cm of foam (kreusen) on top of the beer when the yeast get going. Without space, it will try, and succeed, to get out. There should be no gaps in the fermenter. In theory, small gap wouldn't be so bad during the primary fermentation because the kreusen and the flow of CO2 will ...


4

Nope. Beer will fight very hard to be beer. :) Your beer will not taste exactly like planned, but if it is bubbling then you are off to a good start. Kolsch uses a lager yeast and they are happy with the colder temps. As the beer warms up the yeast will also warm up and work faster, but keep the temps reasonable! A lower amount of water will mean that ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


3

We had this same thing happen during wort chilling. I believe that most food-grade thermometers do not contain lead or mercury. We confirmed by rigging up some magnets and fishing out all of the pellets (lead is not magnetic). We also made sure to very carefully filter on transfer to remove any remaining glass. The batch turned out great! The ...


3

I never go past 3 weeks on the primary yeast cake. If left too long the yeast can start to consume some of the trub material and produce "off" flavors. A month probably will be fine and I'm sure there are those who leave it sitting on the trub longer but I like to take it off and play on the safe side.


3

Sure, you can do an open ferment with the bucket lid partially open. Be certain to pitch plenty of yeast, and airate the wort - you want a short lag time before the yeast start fermenting, to ensure no other microbes take over the wort. Once fermentation has started, the co2 produced will keep airbourne microbes out of the fermentor. For a normal gravity ...


3

Assuming you followed sanitary practices, then I don't think you've wasted any money at all. sounds like a tasty mead...maybe a bit heavy on the ginger, but that's really down to personal preference. When making mead, it's a good idea to add yeast nutrient with the honey so the yeast have something to propagate from, and remember to airate well, especially ...


3

The gravity reading pretty much indicates fermentation was done. Shaking the bucket just knocked the CO2 out of solution, like shaking up a can of soda. The crud you were trying to get back into the "beverage" is called krausen. Its mostly yeast and other proteins from the malt. Not knowing your recipe I don't know if you used hops or not as part of the ...


3

They're trying to make one simple, common set of instructions that satisfy both a large range of beers as well as a huge variability in customers, across the dimensions primarily of: inherent yeast performance, yeast health, lag time, fermentation temperature and adherence to instructions/technique, including a comfortable margin of "safety". In short: ...


3

You can dilute/blend your beer to diminish the ABV (and increase the volume). Brew Your Own magazine has a nice article on that.



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