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4

The inward pressure is caused by the temperature of the air in the carboy being colder than the air outside and/or increases in atmospheric pressure - both will cause the pressure inside the carboy to be less than the pressure outside. This doesn't indicate that there is anything wrong with your brew.


4

As Denny mentioned, head formation is primarily related to protein though dissolved carbonation level will also have something to do with it. If you're adding a fixed amount of priming sugar to a single pressure vessel, as you dispense beer, the increased amount of headspace will allow some of the CO₂ to leave the beer, making it flatter. You do not want to ...


3

Foam formation is related to the protein content of the beer and fermentation specifics. You can increase the protein content by steeping some non diastatic malt, like crystal, as part of your brewing liquor. Once you have the protein in your beer, increased hopping increases foam as the polyphenols in the hops bind the proteins in the beer. For the ...


3

You definitely just need to wait longer. I always wait at least two weeks, more for higher gravity beers. Waiting will not only improve the quality of the head and carbonation level, but almost everything else about the beer will get better if you give it more time. A side note on your step 6, it's best to keep splashing to a minimum when racking after ...


3

Carbonating the beer from priming sugar takes at least a week, often closer to 2 to be ready. The problem here is that you were sampling a too early: After another couple of days I was tapping off nice pints of dark ale under reasonable pressure (at least I thought it was reasonable pressure - it might not have been) but with no head. I'd only tap a ...


1

Original Source: BYO.com Balancing your Draft System: Advanced Brewing With: 3/16" beer lines Serving tap 2ft above the keg 5 PSI CO2 serving/dispensing pressure (high for some Homebrewers) A 2ft beer line would be a good starting place (but start longer you can always cut some off but you can't put back on). A matter of balance Calculating ...


1

You are not likely to have much success trying to force carb in a pressure barrel as they will generally vent before reaching a high enough pressure in order to protect the pressure barrel. They are not designed to hold pressure to the degree kegs are. After 4 weeks, unless the pressure barrel was stored too cool, you are likely to have all the carbonation ...


1

I've not used this type of equipment, but if you're sure everything is sealed then you should still be able to add more priming sugar and re-carbonate the brew. 4 weeks is a little on the long side, so the yeast may not be as viable as they were, but there will still be sufficient yeast in the beer to carbonate, but it may take a while - a couple of weeks. ...



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