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4

You are basically veering towards the land of a Black Velvet made with cider (1/2 Guinness, 1/2 Cider) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_and_Tan, so I don't think trouble is necessarily on it's way. I have done this with stouts and porters in the past and found them to be enjoyable. Instead of brewing it all together...make a really good peach cider and a ...


3

I once made a porter with 4% black (patent) malt. It was nearly undrinkable due to the astringent ashy flavor. Letting it sit for a couple of months in the keg helped, but it was still overly assertive. Carafa III is similar to black patent. In fact some sources claim that one can be substituted for the other. If your grist included more than 1 or 2% Carafa ...


3

Black malt and Roasted Barley will deliver coffee notes. Using anywhere from 0.5lb up to 1lb of either (or in combination) per 5 gallon batch is the norm. Caramel notes are easily delivered from crystal/caramel malts. I have used a full pound of Crystal 60L in a brown ale and it had a real nice toffee/caramel punch to it. Using less than a pound of ...


3

The fruitiness will reduce over time, espeically in big beer like that which can take a year or more to reach maturity, by which time the esters will definitely have lessened, so don't give up on this one just yet. Pitching dry yeast directly into secondary with a high alcohol content will lead to a poor fermentation. It will probably pick up eventually, ...


3

The lines between the two blur a bit due to historical evolution porter was a dark raosty and smokey brew. When brewers made them stronger they were referred to as Stout porters to indicate strength. In time the two have seperated slightly enough to warrant different catagories for each. Today Porters tend to be drier with a somewhat more acrid or ashy ...


2

In a nutshell, it's to do with strength. Just to contra the downvote, Brad Smith, author of beersmith has blogged about porter, and links to several recipes. I've looked over the recipes, and the darker ones could easily be taken as stout recipes, and the lighter ones, brown ale recipes. I remember the guide telling at the Dublin Guinness brewery that they ...


2

There are a number of ways to brew with actual coffee: Add hot or cold brewed coffee to the beer Soak coffee grounds in the beer (usually at flameout, or in secondary) For both techniques the coffee can be added at various points in the brewing cycle: at the end of the boil, after fermentation has finished, or at bottling/kegging time. Opinions vary on ...


2

I know you are looking for an amount of coffee to add, but actual coffee is not the way to get coffee flavor out of your brew. the coffee bean contains oils which will inhibit your head retention and some other effects. I'm no expert on this topic so do your own research, but I use grains like chocolate malt,and some roasted barley depending on what coffee ...


2

Was this an All Grain brew, or Extract? Was the flavor apparent from the start, or did it develop over time? Brewing All Grain pale-to-amber beers is pretty easy. If your water isn't slap full of chlorine/iron/etc (ie, tastes pretty good) then you can happily brew away without a care in the world. And a lot of all grain brewers make great beer .... up ...


2

I am by no means an expert on Porter, but I will tell you that my dark beers got better once I understood that those very dark roasted grains (chocolate, roast barley, etc) can pull down your mash pH too low, and give off chalky, astringent, dry flavors. To get around this, I suggest cold-steeping your dark grains separate from your mash (or steep, if you ...


2

You'll definitely make beer if you follow the process above, so in that sense you're definitely not in for trouble. However, I'd be careful mixing "peach" and "porter". The flavors don't sound natural together, but I've been surprised before. You should test it out before you commit the whole batch. Try taking a small sample of your beer after ...


2

There are a couple of things that you can do to prevent the esters from occurring in your next brew Hydrate your dried yeast according to the instructions before pitching Use Mr Malty to calculate the correct amount of yeast to pitch Control your ferment temperature. US-05 will produce very few esters at 18C or 64-65F


2

If you plan to steep grains to make more wort, be sure to boil it to kill spoilage organisms and also to remove the oxygen. You could try steeping another 0.5lb of the blackprinz and 1lb of the black wheat might give more of the stronger roastiness you'd expect in a robust porter, but since both of these malts is huskless, you're not going to get some of ...


1

I had a similar problem recently with a stout recipe that was very close in carafa / chocolate malt content. I don't know what caused it, but after about 3 weeks in the bottle it started to mellow. Six weeks later it is pretty darn tasty. In fact, I think I'll go drink one right now.


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For most of my darker beers, I am adding those darker grains at sparge, not during the main mash. All you really want from them is the color and some roast flavor. Its not really bumping up your gravity that much. Everything from chocolate, to carafa, to darker crystal malts. Add them later when you sparge with water <170 degrees.


1

Just one more thing on the subject, i don't think i have seen Black roasted Barley on any Porter recipe and most Stout recipes do.



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