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8

Before I got kegs, I used to bottle with 1.5 liter PET soda bottles (the standard size in Norway.) The beer tasted fine, even after several months, and no hint of soda. I used to soak them for 24-48 hours to remove the labels, then clean thoroughly with PBW or OxiClean. Then sanitize with StarSan. After this, there is no odor from the bottles and, as far ...


7

Maggie is right, if you are using a food grade plastic it should be fine. I do have to say that what you are doing with the boiling water essentially an unnecessary step and may be actually increasing your chances of infection, not decreasing them. Hear me out. Boiling water doesn't stay boiling very long once off the heat. You can't heat the bucket ...


5

Abridged answer: primary them for 6 weeks, and if your gravity is where you want it, then rack to one of your PET bottles and age. Simply, you could have some off-flavors as a result of yeast autolysis. For higher-gravity beers, you want to let the yeast do their work, but if there is going to be 9 or higher ABV once fermentation is completed, that is a ...


5

Fermenting in a the free 5 gallon bottles you can get will work fine - after all that's pretty much what Better Bottle PET Carboys are. Compared to the 2-2.5 gallons of headspace you get in a bucket fermentor, the 1 gallon that you're leaving isn't much, especially for a high gravity beer like a RIS, so be sure to use a blowoff tube rather than an airlock. ...


5

Secondary for a Hefe seems silly to me. Leave it in primary for 5 more days is a better idea. Then rack right to bottling bucket for bottling day. Actually 5 days in secondary for any beer is a waste of time really. Any benefit isn't worth the extra cleaning of equipment and risk of exposure to oxygen or airborne contaminants.


5

Absolutely you can. I've been doing it for years.


3

Although it doesn't say they are food safe, those plastics are relatively safe at room temperature. Beer lines are made from PVC and PTFE is used a lot in kitchenware. Of course, we don't know exactly how they have been processed/handled, this is still guesswork. No-one here can tell you if they are food safe/acid-safe etc.. just by looking at them. An ...


3

I'm guessing you are talking about making a data logger to monitor fermentation temps, mash temps, etc. Your question is quite vague and you need to clarify it to get better answers. What temps are you talking about, environmental conditions, etc. What parts are going to contact the beer/wort? A drawing would help. I've used weatherproof electrical ...


3

If your plastic container is food grade, you should be okay.


3

Check out shipping on those tanks. I looked into placing an order of five of their 35-gallon tanks and it would cost $450 to freight them to me. Don't forget (or "have you heard") about Mini-Brew plastic conicals. They're a little more expensive, but you get a racking port and a side port for temperature probe. I found mine on eBay for about half the ...


3

6 months later and having used both king keg and corny keg there is one major point to add: Force carbonation with a corny keg comes the additional expense of a CO2 regulator but with this comes the capability to accurately control the pressure of CO2 on your beer and get the level of carbonation you want (something I struggled with previously). It was ...


3

I'd give the the PET a chance with just a few. Maybe even add a little extra sugar to a couple of those to see if they can take more pressure than normal just as a back up assurance should you end up with a contaminated batch at some point. If you are willing to risk a batch I'd say the same thing for the jerry can. But its a big volume once you open it ...


2

Don't worry about it at all. 5 days in a plastic bucket will be fine. I've left beer in a bottling bucket for much, much longer than that, and it's fine.


2

I wouldn't risk carbonating in the JerryCan. I've seen Gatorade bottles explode under pressure and it's not fun. I would stay away from anything that's not made to handle the pressure. I would even be hesitant to use the linked PET bottles unless they say somewhere that they're rated for pressure. In my early days I would use 2-liter soda bottles when I ...


2

A lot of brewers use silicone tubing for hot liquids, but there's no reason aside from cost not to use it for racking as well. That will take if the tubing part but you've still got to deal with the racking cane which is rigid. Copper or stainless tubing could be bent into the correct shape.


1

I am convinced that the answer is that the PTFE probe is definitely safe, and it is unclear whether the PVC is safe, or whether it would leach unknown quantities of pthalates into your beer. PTFE is the chemical name for Teflon. As we know, Teflon is considered chemically inert and safe for use in food applications, including on no-stick cookware, as long ...


1

WOW! good detailed question! I have no actual experience with this specifically but I can sympathise with the chemical/material compatibility question. I have most always had success with searching the great world wide web, with "*** vs. ****", in your case "PVC vs. alcohol" (by the way a search for Polyvinyl Chloride worked better than "PVC"). In the link ...


1

If the sanitizing solution is no rinse, you shouldn't rinse it...that's what "no rinse" means! If you rinse you pretty much negate the effect of your sanitizer. There is no need for the bottles to dry before using. Just drain out as much liquid as possible.


1

The Worst that could happen is you ruin the batch (undrinkable) and end up with stained containers that give a strange flavor to things you use them with. That's probably unlikely. If you use the plastic bucket for 4-6 months with the mead, you may end up leaching some of the plastic chemicals into the mead, giving it a plasticy taste. If you're set on ...


1

Off flavors come from process issues and sanitation issues. An example of a process issue would be over-pitching or under-pitching yeast, or over oxygenating or splashing while transferring and oxidizing finished beer. Sanitation issues are off flavors from microbial infection. I would say that most of the time off flavors are generated through process ...


1

I can't comment on Palmer's observations, I haven't had a plastics-related infection. Generally, from a scratch standpoint glass is better than plastic, when it comes to using carboys as fermenters. But only from that standpoint. Plastic carboys are superior in a lot of ways, but hard to clean because you can't just go at them with a bottle brush. ...


1

I wouldn't think they're "food grade". I wouldn't do it. In Canada, pop comes in 2-litre platic bottles. I've bottled in them lots of times. If you have something like that in the UK, it would probably be a lot cheaper than buying jerry cans, even if you dump out the pop.


1

Yes, they're fine to reuse, if: Threads are good Inner seal is good Just make sure to rinse them asap, sanitize them before use, and inspect and toss any worn out ones regularly. The safety seals don't matter, but you may want to consider replacing the caps if you're transporting the beer--there's the chance an officer could claim that the broken seal ...


1

I think it comes down mostly to materials. You don't want to store your beer in a plastic "keg" for any length of time. Stainless steel is a better option because its easier to clean, it can get banged around, and it lasts longer. The rest just comes down to size issues and what suits your needs. You can get 3 gallon kegs up to full on half barrels (15.5 ...


1

The problem with using a bottling bucket as a secondary is that when the remaining yeast and whatever else is floating around in your beer settles, it will get churned up when you open the spigot on your bottling bucket. It would be better to leave it in the primary than move it to the bottling bucket, because you are basically negating the whole purpose of ...


1

Those would be perfect, one of the biggest home brew shops in the UK sells a range of plastic conical fermenters like these. As stated the risk would be in getting a scratch and thus an infection. But if you are careful with it you should get 2-3 years out of it. For $55 I think its a no-brainer.


1

Ale Pales are normally HDPE (high density polyethylene), for what its worth. You could always ferment in a half barrel for 10-12 gallon sized batches for cheaper than the NB conical, but maybe not cheaper than $55 for one of those plastic conicals.



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