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7

Where to get the yeast is answered in your other question. The strain doesn't much matter unless its a huge beer and is exceeding the alcohol tolerance of a neutral strain like S-05. Generally I like to use the yeast I fermented with, by keeping some from the starter or some from the trub in the primary for bottling. I add it to the bottom of the bottling ...


7

The only beers I ever add yeast to for bottle conditioning are those big beers that sit for more than two months in secondary. The reasons are as you stated, tired yeast and the issue of not having enough yeast in suspension. I have crash-cooled a couple of younger ales, and not had any issues in bottle carbonation. I would be interested if anyone else had ...


5

Tests at the homebrew level have shown that there is no benefit to racking off the trub. But it won't hurt, either, if you want to do it. So, the answer is, either way is fine. I'd be inclined to leave it based on the theory that the less you mess with the beer, the better off you are. In addition, I can't think of a major brewer that settles then racks ...


4

The second round of yeast will just add a yeasty flavor to the beer if it doesn't flocculate out much. But the change in flavor will be negligible. Depending on the temperature you were fermenting at all the fermentation could have happened when you weren't paying attention. If the beer was warm going from 1035 to 1010 overnight is very likely. FWIW, I'd ...


3

If you have another vessel, like a carboy, I'd rack the beer into secondary for a week or two to really let the yeast settle out. Since it has nothing to eat it will drop out just like your first pitch did. Having the beer in a transparent vessel will help you see when it's clear enough for bottling. Shouldn't be a problem at all. In no way could this ruin ...


3

Sorry, but your beer is probably not going to be drinkable. If you're lucky, the wort was infected by a wild yeast. In this case, it may taste a little funky but will still be beer. The more likely scenario is that your beer was infected by bacteria or mold, and will be unpleasant or undrinkable. Since you've already pitched the yeast, you might as well ...


3

With a starter that large, it's best to pour off the starter wort. To do this, you can either leave it for a few days for the yeast to settle out, or put the starter in the fridge a few hours before it's needed. Either way, once the yeast have settled, you can pour off the starter wort. You can then put the yeast somewhere that's close to pitching ...


2

If you are already pitching the correct amount of yeast, pitching more will not make the beer ferment faster. In addition, there are negative flavor consequences to pitching too much yeast. Having proper yeast growth in the fermenter is a big factor in ester production or lack thereof. I used to pitch an entire slurry from a previous batch into the next ...


2

With the parameters you're using, re-pitching is most likely unnecessary. You didn't mention the length of time in batch aging (aka secondary) and/or Primary. The ABV looks fine for the yeast. The big items are to make sure that you provide enough priming sugars (distribute well with minimal aeration in the bottling bucket before going into the bottles to ...


2

yes. no. no. the mead is fine. put it in a dark place for a year, check on it again in 9 months, maybe. if you didn't add yeast nutrient, add some in the next month or so. it's fine.


2

If it's a style suited to souring, maybe it'll end up interesting… :S But you left un-sterilized sugar-water alone for 6 days. Bacteria reproduce really fast, much faster than yeast actually, but the side-effects of a healthy pitch of yeast usually crowd them out. I don't have high hopes. If you're limited on fermenter space, dump it and get the next ...


2

OK, a couple things. One, don't make a starter for dry yeast. It has many more cells than liquid so a starter isn't needed. In addition, dry yeast is coated with a nutrient and if you make a starter that nutrient won't be available in your beer. Second, the OG isn't all that high. A single pack of rehydrated dry yeast will be plenty. Make it easy on ...


1

There's a couple of concerns regarding this: The longer your beer takes to begin fermentation, the longer it is prone to (more easily) become infected. Depending on how slowly it is being cooled, you may have clarity issues. You need to chill it quickly to form a good cold-break which is essential to clarity. That said, 8 hours isn't a terrible amount ...


1

Look up some information on no-chill brewing, which is a method for doing exactly that. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/No_Chill_Method One drawback is that if bacteria or wild yeast does make it into your wort, it will have a head start on growth, where otherwise the inoculation of brewer's yeast might overpower the bad bugs and minimize impact. ...


1

If you brewed from extract, then it probably is mostly cold break possibly some hop material as well. Even if you chilled in the kettle, it takes time to settle and so it would have been racked along with the wort. It's not essential, but should you choose to do so you can keep the trub out of the fermentor by whirlpooling the wort in the kettle and ...


1

Final Gravity is final gravity, it's when the yeast is done. If you measure the gravity and it doesn't change after several days, it is done fermenting. You're probably correct in that you probably mashed on the high side and got more unfermentables than expected for the recipe. I definitely wouldn't pitch again, but might consider racking to secondary for ...


1

You'll be fine. I don't worry about repitching unless the beer is over 1.100 OG and/or been in secondary more than 6 months.


1

I've had US-05 ferment up to 10%, it took it a while though. Never tried higher than that.



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