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6

Too soon. Don't sweat it. I bet it will lighten up as it ferments and yeast and trub drop.


5

That sounds like malty flavor, without the sweetness of, say, a scottish beer. A dry maltiness.


3

Most extract-based lager kits are sold with an ale yeast. This is because most home-brewers don't have the equipment to ferment at a consistent low temperature. You could check the kit to make sure, but it's almost certainly the case that your kit makes a light ale, not a lager. I've had good luck in the past with WYeast 2112 (California Lager, equivalent ...


3

You say its taking "Far Longer." how long have you been fermenting? What is the gravity of the pils? if your IPA gravity is 1008/1007 over the last two days I would say your pretty near finished. Assuming your IPA was in the 1050s/1060's when you started; you got great attenuation, I would check gravity again tomorrow and if your getting the same range go ...


3

Yes, the process sounds reasonable, at least to an extent. The purpose of storing them at room temp is to allow refermentation to create carbonation. Then, ideally, you would keep them at 32-35 for two months to allow the beer to lager and the flavor to smooth out. An even better course of action would be to transfer to a secondary, keep that at 32-35 for ...


2

Yes, if you sub some sugar for malt (not add it!) the beer will finish drier to some degree. It might or might not make it more lager like. Corn sugar will not add corn (or any other flavor). Soft water is not necessarily what you want for a pils...it depends on the style of pils. But you certainly don't want a really heavy mineral load, either. You can ...


2

Put it in the basement the entire time. As we move towards winter, your basement should get cooler and that will help with the lagering. The optimal temp would be 50-55^dF, but you can run it a little cooler. The yeast will lag a bit and it just may need a blanket wrapped around it to get started, but it should ferment out fine in the end. As the ...


2

@nhunsaker this sounds pretty standard to me. Most instructions on a beer kit will get you to prime the bottles with sugar for carbonation, then to store them in a warmer place so the carbonation process can start to take place. Then you are told to leave the bottles for two weeks in a cooler place. After that you can put them in the fridge then drink ...


2

According to this study, the use of nitrogen fertiliser can increase SMM levels in (malting) barley across the board. This guy seems to have the right answer though: When using all pilsener malt or pale malt, it may be advisable to boil your wort for at least 90 minutes to reduce the Dimethyl Sulfide levels. He also notes that the DMS flavour is ...


1

I was brewing a Pale Ale. When I was putting it in a carboy, it had red-brown color. After 3 weeks it became pale. So, it will become lighter with time. Just let your yeast do the job.


1

I wouldn't give the instructions too much thought, most kits suggest the same fermentation period and in my experience they are always wrong. Also you dont need to worry about temperatures down to 17c - in fact lager yeast likes it cold. I always leave 2 weeks for primary fermentation, then transfer to a secondary fermenter for a further 2 weeks. At that ...


1

Well I for one would never bottle before a week is through. I leave my brews in primary for 3 weeks. Not because it needs to ferment longer but because the beer needs to condition on the yeast. While your beer may be (and most likely will be) done fermenting after 4-6 days, to round out the flavor I would let it sit at least two weeks. Kit instructions ...


1

Just today I read the brief descriptions of Herkules and Hallertauer Merkur in Stan Hieronymus's "For the Love of Hops". FWIW, a summary: Herkules is described as "smoothly bitter, a reminder that assessing cohumulone's role is complicated." No discussion of aroma, so I'd follow your nose with this one. Hallertauer Merkur is described as "a bittering hop ...


1

Well, it looks like you have a few distinct questions here. I'll try to answer them from experience and will provide evidence where I can. 1.) Yes, you can get your bitterness from late additions. Consider the technique of "hop bursting." This is laid out well in Gordon Strong's Brewing Better Beer, though you could read about it here: Hop burst technique ...


1

I read it as being fermented dry enough so that its crisp like you'd expect that style to be. But in-order to retain a maltiness while drying the beer out its becomes a matter of choosing great ingredients. This is where using the best Continental Pilsner malt available comes into play. Great german pilsner is about a near perfect fermentation to let the ...


1

Adding simple sugars will help your yeast to achieve higher attenuation, with greater effect if you add the sugar towards the end or after primary fermentation. However, having said that, I have doubts that extra sugar will mimic lager characteristics. You're trying to get the dry, crisp flavors of a lager, but a really low FG is a different kind of ...


1

In general, the lighter the malt the more SMM it will have.



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