Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

According to Brewkaiser, the ideal boil pH (room temp sample pre boil) should be around 5.2-5.4. Much lower than that, and you'll reduce hop utilitilization, but much higher and the hop utiliziation increases, but the bitterness is harsher. (The same process that causes tannin extraction at higher pH in the mash is at play in the boil also.) A higher pH in ...


5

The core question is … Why? Different ions lead to different perceived properties in the finished beer; for one example: higher concentrations of chloride emphasize malt character, whereas higher concentrations of sulfate emphasize hop character and dryness. When? Both in the mash and in the sparge water, mostly based on the ratio in volume, with some ...


3

Whether or not they're really necessary depends on the water you have and the beer you want to brew. You need to start by getting an analysis of your water. Some water districts provide all the info you need, but many of them don't. If not, an excellent resource is wardlab.com. Get test W-6. As the what the info means and how you need to adjust your ...


3

For the best results, you should always check your pH and adjust if necessary. Using RO water doesn't change anything. Remember, it's the pH of the mash, not the water, that matters. As pointed out above, you will also need to adjust the mineral content of your water for flavor. That will likely also have an effect on the pH.


2

You'll get more browning with higher pH, but there are also plenty of other reasons for producing a darker wort, so you'll need to at least check the pH before deciding to do anything about it. Ideally your pre-boil pH should be around 5.3-5.5 - lower is better. While adjusting pH may help you with the color, you should be adding minerals to the RO water ...


2

There are a couple things you can try adding to a glass of the beer. The sodium and chloride in salt will aid in the perception of sweetness, so you could try adding a bit to a glass. Too much, though, will obviously give you a salty flavor. You can also add calcium chloride to the glass to enhance the perception if maltiness and sweetness. Again, start ...


1

You could blend the beer with maltier/sweeter beer in the glass to change your perception. Different brewing salts may help but they some are not easily dissolved into cold and carbonated beer, if in fact that's the status of your beer now. In general I always find it better to learn what went wrong and try and fix that than fix the beer. Time better spent ...


1

If you're trying to hit an optimal pH, then yes, you'll have to adjust after each addition. However, rather than sticking with the same pH for the entire mash, is generally best to let the pH rise as temperature rises, since the key mash enzymes that work well at higher temperatures also have higher pH optima. For example, Brewkaiser states beta-amylase ...


1

Reading a little about humulone isomerisation, it seems that both Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions catalyse the reaction, while aqueous alkali is also mentioned (see e.g. Table 8.2 in However, Brewing: Science and Practice by Chris A. Boulton and Peter A. Brookes). All three are present in your tap water but not in the distilled. I would conclude that the bitterness you ...


1

This study demonstrated that iso-alpha acids degraded more quickly in low pH environments, particularly at lower temperatures. If I'm understanding this correctly, I think this means that lower pH beers will lose bitterness over time, compared to high pH. Perhaps your experiments are showing the same effect. The high pH samples were more bitter because the ...


1

Both dark roasted grains (Chocolate, Carafa, etc) and Calcium Chloride decrease mash pH, so adding both to water which works for Amber Ales sounds like you might need to adjust the water pH up (chalk is one way to do that, but its complicated...) If you don't want to figure out the water additions now, and you know your "crystal geyser bottled water" makes ...


1

Calcium Chloride [dihydrate] (CaCl₂) and chalk (CaCO₃)are two different things. You should not add salts unless you: a/ know your water's makeup; you might be able to get most of the relevant details from your municipal water department's yearly report, perhaps even from their website. Otherwise, you can get a test kit, or send a sample to Ward Labs for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible