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3

Well, I don't have references. But I do know that when enzymes are "inactivated" by heat they are irreversibly denatured, destroying them. I'm not sure precisely what you want to have clarified, but the fact is that the only active enzymes will come from your uncooked, active mash. You cannnot "reactivate" the destroyed enzymes.


2

I often do what you're describing when I make a barleywine. As long as the added grains don't need to convert (and in your example they don't) you really don't need to wait at all. At least I don't, and it works fine for me.


1

RDWHAHB. Unless you're confident that you had dirty fermentor, ride it out. You've already invested the time and $$ in the brew day, might as well keg/bottle and see how it turns out.


1

Your process seems fine - I do split batches for the same reason, and not had the problem with body. Do you have measured OG/FG figures? As the gravity of the mash increases, extraction efficiency typically decreases so you may not get out expected efficiency if you base ts on what you normally get when doing a full mash and undiluted boil. Just a ...


1

Since you already have your wort, and know the volume and gravity, you don't need an accurate grain bill for that part, but just need to get the software to register 3.6 gallons of 1.034 wort. You can do it like this: create a new recipe and set your desired batch size. add 1 pound of base malt, e.g. pils malt. Click "gravity" and enter 1.034 as the ...


1

The way I did it was to duplicate the recipe, adjust the volumes until the sparge volume on the first is 0 and the mash volume on the second is close to 0, then fiddle with the efficiency settings on the two until the estimated OG matched my measured OG. I think it ends up around 58%/25% efficiency for the first/second batches. Example recipe link here. ...


1

Short answer, a mash-out should be enough. Just hitting a boil is more than enough. Mashing-out in this case would be key. You'll want to stop all enzymatic activity anyway, so that your wort is stable overnight. This consists of holding the wort at 170°F(76°C) for ten minutes. Here's a pasteurization curve for milk. On the UK standard, an additional ...


1

You can, but baddies will be chowing down on your delicious sugary wort overnight. I've heard of people using the brew in a bag method doing this though. One thought would be to boil it for 15 minutes, put the lid on the kettle. I would think this would work well for a day or so. If you can fit your whole kettle in an extra fridge this would help as ...



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