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10

If you boil the entire volume of your extract batches, go ahead and measure it. But most extract brewers do a partial boil and add top up water afterward. In that case, it's REALLY REALLY REALLY hard to get the extract and water mixed thoroughly enough to get an accurate reading. The extract is heavier due to the sugar in it and sinks to the bottom of the ...


6

My understanding is that a mini-mash is the process of using a small amount of 2-row to alter the fermentability of extract. While a partial mash is simply using a mash for a percentage of your OG. But when I searched the net before answering this question, it seems that I was wrong -- 'mini-mash' and 'partial-mash' are used interchangeably. There may have ...


6

Special B and CaraPils are as different as night and day, so it's going to be hard to compare them directly. Special B is a very dark Crystal Malt (about 140-150L), typically Belgian in origin, which is used to add flavors like: very dark caramel, raisin, or plum. It is the specialty grain that makes Belgian Amber Abbey Ales taste a bit raisin-like, and ...


5

I've done all of the following in extract + grains brewing with 1 - 4 lbs of grain and I can honestly say I've never noticed a difference in the final product: Remove grain bag from brew kettle, place in bowl, pour hot water over it, press it with spoon, add liquid back to kettle. Remove grain bag from kettle, hold above kettle while spraying with hose. ...


5

I like PJs answer, so I'll mention percentages. I think starting at twenty % of the total fermentable is a good place to start. Then you work up more and more by say 10% at a time as you are comfortable and you equipment allows. Eventually, you'll be doing 50-60% from the partial mash and you'll be just one step from going around the corner to all-grain ...


4

Both will work, in the sense that you will get beer at the end, but they will have different results. The 160F steep for a few minutes will not extract much sugars from the base malt, and those that are extracted will be dextrins, non-fermentable sugars that give body, and also starches which will give the beer a haze. Combined with the use of extract ...


4

While many people cite the changes in body and fermentability that can come with changes in water to grist ratios, the impact from 1qt/lb (~ 2l/kg) changing to 1.5 qt/lb (3l/kg) is not noticeable at all, IMO. I have only noticed the impact when going from 1qt/lb to 3 or more qt/lb. The main concern with calculations is that if you are batch sparging you ...


4

When I do a partial mash, I heat about 3 gallons in my kettle to 155-160˚F. Then I'll put my grains in a grain bag, and leave them in the water for about an hour. Generally, most of your fermentables are coming from the extract. The grains in the partial mash lend mostly color and flavor, and not too much sugar, though they do give some. After an hour, ...


4

65% is not bad. Most recipes only expect 70%, so you're not going to be that far off to begin with if you are getting 65%. I wouldn't do partial mash unless you want to. Use Beer Smith or BrewTarget and just adjust your recipe for your efficiency. Read up on how to calculate efficiency first. Understanding your volumes and gravities at each step will help ...


3

Don't worry too much about increasing your efficiency. The important thing is is have an accurate measure of it. Your first mash showed an efficiency of 65%, so go with that until you've done more brews and narrowed it down. I don't know much about all grain kits, but they must make some assumption about efficiency and include the corresponding amount of ...


3

I neeeeever quite get all the little bits unstuck. Fortunately brewing is rather forgiving. Any little bits that still make it will just end up going along for the ride in the next batch. The wort is still being boiled, so any baddies hanging out in the few specks of grain aren't going to make it through. Dunk it in star-san just beforehand if you want ...


3

My process usually looks like this: Empty as much of the bag out into the trash as I can Rinse the bag under running water, getting off whatever bits I can from the outside Turn the bag inside-out Continue to rinse under running water, while mashing and rubbing the bag together in my hands I find that the last step does a pretty good job, and the rubbing ...


2

When I did partial-mash batches, I usually placed the bag of grain in a mesh strainer above my brew pot and poured my sparge water over the bag. It helps to find a strainer wide enough so that it's handles rest on the rim of your pot, otherwise you'll need a brave friend to hold it while you pour your sparge water.


2

After my first partial mash I just let my nylon bag sit in a bowl of hot water for about 15 minutes and then just rinsed the bag really well with the sprayer attachment on my faucet. All the color and bits of grain came right out. I think it also helped that I turned the bag inside out to clean it as most of what was stuck to the bag was on the inside.


2

Most beer is made from a base malt plus specialty grains. In your case, you're using LME as your base malt instead of whole grains, but the result is largely the same as an all-grain brew. The base malt provides the bulk of the sugar that the yeast eats and the additional malt and grains give it flavor and character. Selecting different malts and grains to ...


2

With two pounds of base malt, and one pound of maize, you can certainly get away with 30 minutes and expect full conversion. Thats been the case in my experience, especially at 154F temps. The warmer the mash the faster things progress. And most flaked maize is pre-gelatinized, BTW.


2

Extract twang is not an extract issue at all. It is a fermentation issue derived from poor yeast health, under pitching, temperature fluctuations or any other phenomena that stresses yeast out. If the beer was only in primary for one week with poorly fermenting yeast that could be the source of your problem. Next time go with two weeks primary as a ...


2

Denaturing any enzymes takes some time...at least 20 min. If you don't go over 162, you should be OK in terms of having enough beta left. The majority of the conversion will be done in the first half hour or so, but as long as you're still in the 145+ range, long chain dextrins will continue to be broken down into shorter ones. It's based on the entire ...


1

As Denny noted, there's already a lot of unfermentables. I would start at 154°F since the fermentability of this wort is not going to be high so you want to get as much out of the beta conversion as possible. 160°F is the limit for beta amylase activity and it's quickly denatured. If you want a thicker body on the beer, try using a less attenuative ...


1

I've probably bought that same pack, and the fact they don't list the ingredients in proportion is annoying. I guess they figure its "trade secrets" or whatever. Making the assumption that this isn't your first partial mash beer, I would suggest that you partial-mash normally, using the same water and minerals (if any) that you KNOW make good beer. The ...


1

The pre-hopped extract doesn't need boiling like regular hops, since the bittering acids are already isomerized and are soluble in the extract. So if you were boiling for 30 minutes to get more bitterness, then you don't need to. EDIT: If you're mashing with a lot of pilsner malt, then a longer boil is beneficial to drive off SMS, which later becomes DMS - ...


1

You can make a large range of great brews using the same base malt all the time; regardless of extract or all grain brewing. The variety in appearance and flavors style to style is in the specialty grains. When I extract brewed I always bought the same style of DME (light) and did everything else with specialty grains. (I think golden, amber, brown, dark ...


1

In my experience, neither of those malts drives mouthfeel more than mash temp. I have brewed dry and crisp beers with more than a half pound of Special B in it, by using a lower mash temp. Head retention has more to do with freshness, protein content of the base malt and how you mash it more than cara-pils helps it out. Maybe people will disagree, but if ...


1

You're right - maize doesn't contain any enzymes and needs to be mashed alongside a high Lintner grain, like the 6-row you've chosen. If the maize is pre-gelatinized, then you can just hit your target mash temp for the fermentability profile you want. For ungelatinized maize, you'll need to hold it at 170F for 15 mins to make the starch soluble and then ...


1

With such a small mash compared to the final volume I'd shoot for enough sparging to just get your sugars out. In this case I'd shoot at a 4 gallon total. So at the end of the mash I'd add in 0.75 gallons of boiling water to raise the mash to mash out. (Not necessary, but it does help a little but with lowering viscosity IMO). Recirc a little to clear the ...


1

You say you want to get to as close as a full mash\sparge as possible, but scaled down so that you are prepared for a full mash. In practice, this means using an amount of water proportinal to contribution to the OG contributed by the mash. For example, if you were to get half of your OG from extract, and half from the mash, then you'd aim for 3.5 gallons of ...


1

Each of those tastes quite different from the other. Special B is more like a raisiny Crystal 120L than anything. Carapils is going to give you a lot of dextrins, and is probably what you're after as far as a thicker mouthfeel and head retention, but it isn't going to add much in the way of flavor. Some flaked adjunct grains (barley, oats, etc.) would ...



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