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3

I've often gotten that flavor from Willamette hops. That might not be your problem, but it's something to consider.


2

Willamette hops are an earthy variety, IMO. It could also be something in your water. Extract has a certain mineral profile already based on where the extract was made. If your water at home has too much of one mineral that is already well represented it can give you some flavor issues. Rare but it does happen. Another water issue may be chlorine or ...


2

The short answer is that the difference in IBU extraction is too small to worry about in a home brewing setting. This is the formula from 'Designing Great Beers' by Ray Daniels: Hop utilization based on boil time: Hop utilization based on boil time: Less than 10 minutes: 0.06 10 to 19 minutes: 0.15 20 to 29 minutes: 0.19 30 to 44 minutes: 0.24 45 to 59 ...


2

There are plenty of online dilution calculators, but if you want a formula, the below was taken from Mechanics of No Sparge Brewing: The Dilution Formula (reference Ray Daniels, Designing Great Beers) Most of the dilution/gravity calculations found in this write up are based on a simple formula that states: Beg Volume * Beg Gravity=End Volume * ...


1

Why not save the hops you don't use and use them in another brew? Although vacuum sealing them is the best way, they'll keep fine for several months in a zip lock freezer bag. Just squeeze out as much air as possible after you put the hops in the bag and keep the bag in the freezer. That way your current beer gets the proper amount of hops and you aren't ...


1

The pre-hopped extract doesn't need boiling like regular hops, since the bittering acids are already isomerized and are soluble in the extract. So if you were boiling for 30 minutes to get more bitterness, then you don't need to. EDIT: If you're mashing with a lot of pilsner malt, then a longer boil is beneficial to drive off SMS, which later becomes DMS - ...


1

The calculation is pretty simple, I think. (Original Point of Gravity) * (boil volume / total volume) = (new points of gravity) 60 * (3.5/4) = 52.5 Predicted SG after dilution, therefore is 1.0525 You should also be aware that with partial boils, your hop utilization will be lower than if you were boiling all the wort. See Palmer's How to Brew.


1

You can work it out by using gravity points. The final gravity is your current gravity (in points) x original volume / new volume. Gravity points is the gravity, but without the leading 1. For example, .060 (original gravity) x 3.5 (original volume) / 4 (new volume) = .0525, or a specific gravity of 1.0525. So your final gravity after topping up to 4 ...


1

When I go to my local HBS to get a kit made up, I have noticed that they do their best not to short me on ingredients but typically over it, sometimes by quite a bit. I assume that you got your kit from northern brewer but I can’t imagine that they don’t do something similar. Did you happen to weigh out you ingredients before you boiled?


1

I plugged your recipe into Beersmith, which comes up with a max OG of 1.064, assuming 100% efficiency extracting sugar from the 1/2 lb of specialty grains. How did you get 1.082? Guesses: Boiled the wort down too far and concentrated it. You'd have to boil off a whole gallon to get to 1.082, though. Hydrometer is bad - calibrate in 60F distilled water ...


1

Measuring the water in your boil is completely based on the vessel itself. The marked stick works great, sight-tubes are wonderful, etc. You can determine your actual pre and post boil volumes as you said, by simply going with 50% volumes. The end water in the fermenter will be the weighted average temperature of the water added. i.e. If you have 2.5 ...


1

I'm not sure that I'm contributing much here, since both other answers were so thorough, but I wanted to point out a few things. Most importantly, whatever route you decide to take, be consistent in your methodology from batch to batch. There are quite a few formulas that have been published for calculating IBUs, and none are 100% accurate, especially ...


1

I believe you are looking for a work around not a discussion about gravity, volume and utilization rates. So here goes: The way I work around this is to formulate my recipe as if I wasn't going to add the extract late. That way I know how much total extract I plan to use. Then I delete 80% of the extract (or whatever) and see what happens to the IBUs, ...



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