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16

Well you carbonate the beer in the keg the same way as if you were going to serve from the keg. There is no carbonation procedure on the way into the bottle. To get carbonated beer into the bottles however, the cheapest way to do it is to jam some 3/8ths inch tubing onto the end of your picnic tap. Using about an 12 inch piece of tubing you can put the ...


13

Cold Crashing Why It's Done To allow yeast and other matter to settle out To improve flavor To precipitate chill haze To help prevent oxidation When It's Done After fermentation has finished Usually also after diacetyl rest If you crash the beer too early, the yeast will become inactive (below 40°F) and won't reabsorb fermentation byproducts like ...


12

There are two parts - carbonation, and getting it in the bottles. For carbonation, there are various methods, but I use the set-it-and-forget-it method. Beer goes in keg, keg goes in fridge, CO2 gas gets put on keg. Just set the pressure to the amount of CO2 you want in solution - "volumes" of CO2 - based on the style of beer and a handy temperature / ...


10

In short, it depends. The April 10th, 2008 episode of Basic Brewing Radio is all about glass and skunking. How Fast? Unprotected beer will rapidly skunk. I had a keg of blonde ale in the sun one summer afternoon. The beer in the three feet of tubing spoiled in less than a minute. The small volume of skunky beer was strong enough to ruin an entire pint. ...


8

Go to www.cwcrate.com - there you can get some pretty cool plastic beer cases. They hold up really well too, I've been using mine for quite some time now and there no way they are going to fall apart. What's cool about them is that you can just take your case out in the yard, open it up and pour a bag of ice in and you're all set. Update: cwcrate.com is ...


6

Cold crashing is a technique to get the yeast to flocculate (settle to the bottom of the fermenter). This is generally done to get clearer beer (or wine). It should be done when fermentation is complete, since there will be very little (if any) fermentation activity afterwards. This is because you are effectively removing most of the yeast from the beer. ...


4

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widget_(beer)#Method When the can is opened, the pressure in the can quickly drops, causing the pressurised gas and beer inside the widget to jet out from the hole. This agitation on the surrounding beer causes a chain reaction of bubble formation throughout the beer. The result, when the can is then poured ...


4

I froze a keg of Hefeweizen totally stiff. I had accidentally pulled the temp control probe out of the deep freezer that the kegs were in. The freezer ran at its "normal" freezing temps for maybe 2 days before I noticed it, so the keg was TOTALLY frozen as far as I could tell. Good news: the beer was still delicious! I had decent head on the hefe, and its ...


3

Nothing made of cardboard is going to last long or retain strength exposed to moisture - humidity alone will soften even the heaviest double ply corrugated cardboard over time. Your best bets for transporting bottles would be plastic milk crates or wooden bottle crates. The bottles will rattle around in the milk crate and won't be a perfect fit. The ...


2

In the UK we have access to 5L mini-kegs -> http://www.the-home-brew-shop.co.uk/acatalog/Easy_Kegs.html I don't know if you can get these in the States or not, but they're prefect for parties. Or if you want something a bit bigger, then there are things like -> http://www.barleybottom.com/menu/product/&ID=204


2

I froze a saison in the primary fermenter while cold crashing. Defrosted on the counter to bottle. Very very tasty beer. That was pre-carbonation, but if you're force carbing, it really should not make a difference.


2

How long and how solid were they frozen? They couldn't have been all that frozen or the kegs would have deformed/ruptured. Have you tried any of the beer? It's probably just fine. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but off flavors associated with autolysis come from the living yeast munching on the dead ones. They'll all be dormant from the cold anyway, ...


2

Milk crates actually do a great job of holding bottles. But you have to protect them from light. I know some people actually build 24 bottle case/carriers out of wood to cart bottles around.


2

Take a shoebox and some of that expanding spray foam. Put a nice, thick layer of spray foam in the bottom of the shoebox. Place a layer of plastic wrap on top of that, then press your beer bottle(s) so they sink into the foam. Place another layer of plastic wrap on top of the beer, then cover them with spray foam. You wind up with a nice, shock resistant ...


2

I would definitely go with dry yeast - it is cheaper, and will contribute no additional flavor to the beer. I would go with about 10% of the amount of yeast needed for fermentation. Assuming a 11g packet of yeast, use about 1g.


2

I would contact this company. http://www.cwcrate.com/ They may be able to do custom printing on the crates or you could at least add one yourself.


2

I'm not sure you can "easily" be assured that you have destroyed all of the mold spores embedded within the cork. There are chemicals that are used where interior flood damage has occurred to completely destroy mold spores in wood and other porous materials, however they are expensive, and not always available to "the public". Using anything like bleach, ...


2

I would be surprised if there is any merit to it, at least as far as my understanding of the science behind the oxygen absorbing crowns go. O2 can't simply be absorbed - it has to bond with another substance and oxidize it. The idea is that there is a substance in the crown that when activated by becoming wet will bond with O2, causing the chemicals in the ...


2

It appears that there are both homebrew and commercial issues with absorbing crown liners causing some issues. There is a tweet circa 2010 by Ray Daniels (Cicerone) claiming 2/3s of a loss of aroma within a couple of weeks. I don't know how accurate this claim is; however, I can tell you that I use the caps with my beers, and if I'm drinking them within 6 ...


1

Between checking a box and padding, you're looking at an almost unreasonable amount of space required, and considering how insane some airlines can seem to be with their checked baggage fees, I'd recommend an alternative: Go to your local store that carries clothes of any kind, the cheaper the better, buy the cheapest socks you can buy that are big enough ...


1

What about a folding crate, like this one? http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200485109_200485109 (Credit to http://www.homebrewfinds.com for originally providing me with the lead on this.)


1

I was very excited to see what the community had to offer for this problem as I am in need of a cardboard box replacement as well. Unfortunately, it appears that www.cwcrate.com is out of business. Therefore, I continued to search for a solution. I found the following sets of plans to make wooden crates: set 1 -- enclosed box: these look really nice, ...


1

I've done the math and have determined that I can make ten wooden cases that each hold 24 twelve ounce bottles from a single 4x8 sheet of 3/8" plywood and a single 4x8 sheet of 1/8" masonite hardboard. Tools required: Circular saw (or table saw with a fence extension & large out-feed table) Router Dovetail jig (if you want to dovetail the corner ...


1

The case boxes that breweries used to use for their returnable bottles work well and can last a long time. They are hard to come by these days but if you keep your eye out at garage sales and even on craigs list you may be able to acquire a couple.


1

I have used the Pig for almostcask ale. It's okay. It goes flat within about 2 days, so I wouldn't let it sit around for much more than 48 hours. The restrictor plate could probably come out, and since there's no way to compress the container you probably need to keep the hand pump around to introduce a little pressure into the pig so the liquid can flow ...


1

Before I switched to all-grain, I made dozens of Brew House kits. They are bagged wort kits that come in a super-sturdy carboard box. They hold a dozen or 16 of the bottles I use, depending on the bottle size, and they easily stack 5 or 6 high. This probably doesn't help you much, since you probably don't have a couple dozen of these boxes lying around. ...


1

Get some wine shippers from Uline. You can pick from styro or recycled cardboard packaging. You'll want to bottle into 22s though so they fit properly. Tell UPS its just homemade Apple Cider (not hard cider) or Sasparilla because they won't let you ship alcohol unless you're an approved shipper.


1

Beer for national competitions is normally shipped in glass bottles with just a couple wraps of bubble wrap around it. I have shipped beer multiple times this way and it works out great. Line a box with a plastic bag, just in case there is a leak. Then just put your bubble wrapped bottles in there with a little newspaper to prevent movement in the box. ...


1

Prepackage it at home, when they ask the contents I say non-perisable food items. I reuse boxes that ingredients were shipped to me in, and reuse the packaging. Shipping charges based on weight are killer though.


1

I ship beer all the time and just use FedEx. I just wrap each bottle individually with bubble wrap (going around maybe 2-3 times) then place them in a box filled with packing Styrofoam or newspaper in a way so that none of the beers are touching each other or the box. Haven't hand any issues yet and I've shipped anywhere from a few bombers to 12 beers ...



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