Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

I wouldn't bother. As Jack said, the CO2 given off during fermentation will provide a protective layer between your beer and the evil oxygen. If you want to be really safe, you could not use a secondary at all. I only use them now if I am adding fruit or something to the beer during fermentation. Instead I just leave the beer in the primary for 3–4 weeks ...


10

It couldn't hurt Oxygen is one of the two beer spoilers that homebrewers can control. Reducing beer's exposure to it helps achieve maximum flavor stability. However Before going through the trouble and expense ask yourself if you have a problem. Do your beers taste like wet cardboard or stale crackers? Are you going to lay them down for an extraordinarily ...


9

I use the better bottle PET carboys for my lagers, and have noticed no oxidization. The amount of oxygen introduced through the carboy itself is negligible compared to the amount introduced through the stopper or when racking to the bottling bucket or transferring to keg. The Better Bottle page discussing permeability aims to show that plastic is fine for ...


4

Oxidization happens when there is oxygen dissolved in the beer, such when the beer is splashed or agitated in air. I've always been careful with racking, using either a regular siphon started by blowing into the carboy (through a sanitary air filter) or via an autosiphon. About 2 years ago, I had oxidization problems in a few batches which appeared after ...


4

By being safe and deliberate with your racking methods, I doubt you'll have much of a problem. I believe a fair amount of the problems stem from lack of improper methods of racking (among other things). Some of the things that cause oxidation include: Not getting the siphon tube to sit in the bottom of carboy/bucket/keg while transferring Getting a lot ...


4

I'd say keep your hopes up. Unless you pumped a ton of air through it, I don't think it will absorb as much as you think it will. The real problem comes when you slosh it around in the carboy afterwards if you are moving it to a fermentation vessel or closet somewhere, since you removed the layer of CO2 that was resting on top of the carboy and replaced it ...


4

Oxygen in and of itself is a staling agent, plain and simple. Some styles benefit from being a bit stale. For instance, here in the states, what we know as "British" beer is typically a bit stale simply because by the time it gets here long after being brewed and having crossed the sea in a hot ship, it's not exactly fresh. So if you want to clone your ...


4

To follow-on to Dean's answer - while it's not a bad idea to purge the secondary, unless you're having a problem with oxidized beer I wouldn't worry about it. If you're currently using, say, a 6.5 gallon carboy as a secondary for 5 gallon batches, a much simpler fix would be to start using a 5 gallon carboy as your secondary. You want head space in the ...


4

In short, yes it does oxidize, but it's not usually a problem for your beer, since it's heavily diluted. With no airlock (to allow gas transfer) and constant stirring, oxidization is inevitable once the yeast have come out of the lag phase and start fermenting. During the lag phase, most of the oxygen is taken up by the yeast as part of propagation, but ...


4

The reason it's not an issue in primary is because the headspace is full of CO2 - all the oxygen has been purged and replaced with CO2 many many times over during fermentation. When you rack to secondary, the headspace is full of air - 21% oxygen - so you want to minimize the headspace to reduce both the surface area of the wort and the amount of oxygen ...


3

I've done it and it works fine, although it isn't ideal. You do risk possible oxidation, but if you don't keep it there for too long you should be OK. Do you happen to have a CO2 tank to purge the 6 gal. with? Or how about using the 6 gal. for the new batch of beer and skipping secondary on the other one? Secondary is usually unnecessary.


3

If what you're getting is really air and not CO2, then yes, it can be a real oxidation issue. It's happened to me and I've tasted it in other people's beers. As has already been stated, check your connections to be certain that there are no leaks there. I've found that you can ofter clear the bubbles out of the line by pinching the tubing behind the ...


3

Check all your connections to make sure they are tight. I've had problems at the connection point between the tube and the spigot coming off of the bucket, but the spigot had varying widths as it went up so I just shoved the tube on a little farther and it solved the problem. If you heat the tube up a little in some warm water, it will become more malleable ...


2

You won't necessarily pick up more oxygen, if you purge both the keg, carboy and filter with CO2. Purging will minimize the exposure to oxygen. But you'd need 3 transfers: rack from the carboy to the keg (only the keg will handle pressure.) from the keg, through the filter, to the carboy. finally, rack from the carboy to the keg again. With this many ...


2

24 hours in, I don't think you have much to worry about. As mdma suggested, you still have active yeast that would gladly clean out any oxygen that finds its way into the beer. That said, I would either move the fermenter very soon or not at all. The vast majority of your fermentation is going to happen in the first 2-3 days. That period of most active ...


1

The bubbles are large so although some oxygen will have been absorbed it's not as much as say sloshing the beer around in the carboy for 60 seconds. The beer will probably oxidize in time, say 2-4 weeks, but you can do two things to mitigate this: drink the beer within a couple of weeks store the beer at fridge temp. This will reduce the rate of staling ...


1

When you add fruit like that, it's probably a good idea to do so when it's actively fermenting. So I will presume that's the stage you are in, or that you will add something fermentable to get there. Racking half of your actively fermenting batch into an empty carboy will probably not oxygenate to a level where you should be concerned because there will be ...


1

I think more important than whether a beer will benefit from oxidation is whether the flavor of the beer will benefit from being aged in an oak barrel. I think that the flavor of the oak is going to outweigh the flavor change of oxidation. In that case I would look at commercial examples that are oaked or aged in oak or bourbon barrels such as Founders KBS ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible