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24

OxyClean. The stuff works wonders. Fill a bucket with a scoop of OxyClean and hot water and let the bottles soak for about an hour. Most labels will simply slide right off; some will even float right off the bottles to the surface. The ones that don't will be easy to remove with a rag or sponge. You also generally never want to use dish soap or detergent on ...


17

Oxiclean isn't a sanitizer, it's a cleaner. You can see here for the difference (What is the difference between Clean, Sanitized and Sterilized?). If you're fairly clean it might not matter, but using oxiclean will not kill bacteria; it will only remove a fair amount of it. That being said, I believe you're close; the brewery cleaners and oxyclean (free) do ...


9

For removing your own labels that you apply to your bottles, use a label with a hot-soak water soluable adhesive. When you're ready to reuse your bottles, a soak in hot soapy water is all that's needed to slide the labels off. Removing labels from store-bought beverage bottles can be hit or miss because each bottler can use different label materials and ...


5

Oxiclean is a fine cleaner, requiring just a few minutes contact to clean, depending upon how soiled the equipment is. As it's decomposition includes hydrogen peroxide, it can also be used as a sanitizer in sufficient dosage. Hydrogen peroxide is a great sanitizer, but there are some drawbacks it's corrosive to metals, since the peroxide increases the ...


4

I've used a big tub of water with some baking soda in it. I just tossed rinsed bottles in there as I accumulated them. Not sure how long it really took, since I didn't try and remove the labels for a while, but they came off really easily. As far as the amount of baking soda, maybe a teaspoon per 2 or 3 gallons? Not that much.


4

I've tried a couple of solutions, but the one that works best for me is an overnight soak in a big tub of water with a half-gallon of ammonia. The labels just slide right off.


4

I never found One Step to be a very effective sanitizer. Some informal experiments I did years back showed that OxiClean seems to sanitize, but I'm not satisfied enough with those results to give up using StarSan. Yes, it's expensive, but it's also very effective. And it's not as expensive as losing a batch of beer to infection.


4

You might want to give the cleaning episode of the Brew Strong podcast. Jon Herskovits of Five Star Chemicals is in that episode, and they talk about the differences between cleaning and sanitizing,etc.


2

Soak with bleach for 1+ hours in initially hot water. Then scrap them off with a butter-knife like whittling a log- works great.


2

Getting the Labels Off I'm only adding a little bit here. I only use OxyClean, like many others, but what I do is put the bottles standing up in a cooler, then fill them with hot tap water. Dump a bit of oxyclean in the cooler, and fill it with hot water. It holds the temp for quite a long while, after a couple of hours the labels are floating off, or they ...


2

Although you could use bleach as a effective "yes-rinse" sanitizer, the chances are the bugs are in your environment, not just the equipment, so you'd have to do this before each brew, which is a bit of a pain. Last year I had some slight contamination issues, which I later tracked down to my forgetting the correct dosage of Star San. (That's what happens ...


1

I have been using oxiclean for years and it hasn't been a problem. My brew pot is aluminum and I haven't had any adverse affects.


1

You'll have to thoroughly examine your sanitation process. Of course we all think that we're doing it perfectly, but most of us are not. Think about any equipment that might not get sanitized (for example, your ball valve coming out of the kettle -- do you sanitize it before running the wort out of it? Look for things like this) My hunch is that it's ...


1

Clean, sanitize, keep it simple. Infections will happen because of other things in your environment. You could try wiping down all surfaces around which you will be working for a while. That may help. Also you could try replacing equipment which is inexpensive and more likely to be trouble, like stoppers and airlocks. However, usually your key issue is ...


1

The way I was taught, cleaners are used for anything visible, such as hop material at the top of a carboy or a tube filled with gunk, and sanitizer is for everything contacting your beer that you CAN'T see. Using a good sanitizer will reduce the population of bacteria on equipment surfaces to as low as possible. I can't comment on oxiclean (which would be ...


1

If you can afford it, its really nice to buy new glass. If not, you can get some labels off easier than others. You might have to experiment to see which ones are the easiest to remove.


1

As mentioned above, oxiclean is a cleaner, not a sanitizer. I strongly recommend picking up some BTF Iodophor solution for sanitizing. 2 capfuls of solution is enough to sanitize a standard 5 gallon carboy, keg, etc. Great stuff


1

I like De-Solv-It. You can usually find it at Ace Hardware. Just spray to saturate label or residue, wait 10-20 min, and it should rub right off. It's made of citrus oils and other organic ingredients so it should be safe. It smells like oranges and has a slightly greasy feel but that washes off easily with soap and water.


1

For stubborn labels, try an organic solvent like acetone. It should remove most any common label and won't leave any residue. Rubbing alcohol may also work.


1

Just soak in hot water most come off easily. Recycle the ones that dont.


1

I usually find soaking them in my sterilising solution does an excellent job.



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