Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

There is only one real answer, absent any off smells or flavors and that's too many fermentables. Infections can cause gushers too, but there would be other signs. You are either adding too much priming sugar (corn sugar, DME, what have you) or you are not letting your beers reach terminal gravity, which is the point when they go dormant due to lack of ...


7

This is one of the reasons I'm glad I keg my beer now. I had this happen a bunch of times when I used to bottle. From what I've always heard, it is most likely due to either a.) Too much priming sugar, or b.) Too many fermentable sugars left--in other words, fermentation wasn't complete. Another cause could be bacterial infection, but my sanitation was ...


6

Disclaimer: I'm just some dude on the internet. Anything I say is for recreational purposes only. I wouldn't carbonate over 2.5-3 volumes of CO2 in the normal beer bottles that we get the majority of our non-Belgian beers from. For anything higher than 3 volumes of CO2, I'd try to find the heavier weight bottles (think Duvel & Westmalle ...


4

The first step to correcting it is to determine why it's happening. There are generally 2 causes. Either bottling too early, before fermentation is complete, or an infection can cause those symptoms. If the beer that was bottled previously still tastes good and like it used to, it's likely the former. If the beer is starting to taste sour or "funky", ...


4

I'd say this is sort of a moving target. Mainly because bottles do lose their structural integrity slightly every time they get used. More so if they bottles are baked in the oven or exposed to the heat-dry cycle of a dishwasher that accelerates the process. That said if we just assume newer bottles all the time, I'd think that you can contact the bottle ...


3

Its one of the following: Incomplete fermentation leaving residual sugar in the bottle. Too much priming sugar. Which would also be amplified as a problem if #1 is the case. You inadvertently picked up an infection and the non-fermentables along with the priming sugar has led to over carbing. Your opening the bottles warm and the CO2 is no longer ...


3

Brett won't change the amount of priming sugar you need. Just be sure fermentation is complete before bottling. The problems people have had with Brett is if it is added later after another yeast, it can consume sugars the other yeast won't consume, leading to overcarbonation. Also, it usually ferments slower than saccaromyces, so you may want to wait ...


2

Did you put the beer in the fridge overnight before opening it? The problem you describe sounds a lot like bottled-carbonated beer that never had a chance to get the CO2 dissolved into the beer: lots of foaming when you pop the cap, then flat beer in the glass. Gases dissolve more readily into cold liquid than warm liquid. When your residual yeast ...


2

Assuming that you were careful about sanitization, the batch should be fine, 1-2 inches of head space is about right. For future reference (if you didn't already know) when you are using a bottle filler, just fill the bottle to the top and when you remove the filler you should have the right amount of head space.


2

Check that your glass is totally clean and free from oils and detergent. I doubt the beer lost it's head because of overcarbonation (and I don't think you've overcarbonated.) Even if you did, wheat beers tend to be served with medium-high to high levels of carbonation. The head stability is produced from proteins and hop acids. Looking at the recipe in the ...


1

Use the thick bottles to bottle with when using brett. I would suggest not using priming sugar for the brett. I do not know your FG for the beer, but the brett will eat the residual maltose and produce c02. Adding priming sugar will either make the beer over carbonated or make the greater possibility of a bottle bomb. I just pulled a bretted dubbel that ...


1

I've not noticed any effect in any of the Brett beers I've done - if I'm doing Brett stuff though I will always bottle into half champagne bottles or Orval bottles, assume that they'll be bombs and wrap the whole lot in bin bags just in case. I've not had any bottle bombs though but I think it pays to be safe.


1

What was the final gravity? How long did you ferment before bottling? I'm guessing that there were residual fermentable sugars (i.e. fermentation wasn't complete) or you used too much priming sugar when bottling. Either way, the yeast had too much sugar left to consume inside the bottle and produced too much carbonation. If you hit your final target ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible