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5

Yes, a lower original gravity will result in a lower-alcohol final product. However, if this was an extract kit and if you added the correct amount of water, the discrepancy is almost certainly a measurement error. A common mistake is to draw the hydrometer sample without having first mixed the extract thoroughly into the water. This will lead to an ...


4

You can, of course decrease it by adding water......this calculator will help: http://merrycuss.com/calc/gravityadjustmentwater.html If you don't decrease your gravity a couple of things could happen. First, your yeast might not work, usually different (or more) yeasts are used for high gravity brews. If your yeast does work it might not attenuate fully. ...


3

If you used extract, and you didn't dramatically change the water volumes or add any additional fermentables, then it's highly unlikely that your gravity is that far off. The usual cause with this sort of process is incomplete mixing of the boiled portion added to the water in the carboy, leading you to get a sample of the exceptionally-concentrated boiled ...


2

This is a good question, and I've talked to a few people that agree. I think it's just the nature of the recipe definition/creation process (especially historically): we control most directly the OG, not the FG, even if we're able to anticipate/estimate it. But, yes, we're really trying to control the bitterness:sweetness ratio in the consumed beer, and FG ...


2

Don't worry about it too much. The answer to your question lies in your opinion only. If you add more water at bottling, all you will do is dilute it - less flavor and a lower ABV. Once you have your FG reading, calculate your ABV and then decide if you would like it to be lower. I know you aren't asking for opinions, but I'll give it anyway: I would not ...


2

Did you add water after you put the rest of the stuff in the fermenter? If so you got incomplete mixing and a false OG.


2

In theory a 11g packet contains 220 billion cells, which should do fine for an 18 liter batch. 23 is not such a big difference, so I am sure you are not in any major risk area. With re-hydration you should be good. I am sure that, with the rousing, your beer will get closer to panned FG. Note that, when rousing the yeast bed you will also stir up a lot of ...


1

It's too late for this beer in my opinion. Adding DME+water could work at a really high concentration. I have never done this, but there's no reason why that wouldn't work. But that seems more trouble than its worth to me. A new starter should not be necessary. To be honest, you should have left the extra sugar out. That's just going to thin it out and ...


1

It could be that starch from the rice was released over time into solution, raising the specific gravity. Starch has the same effect as sugar on specific gravity, as it increases the density of the solution.


1

Unless you added more sugars to the wort after taking the OG reading, it wouldn't be possible for the FG to be higher. As you more than likely know, the Hydrometer measures buoyancy of the liquid. The physics of it works like this: Pure water will have a gravity of 1.000. However, the more sugar you add to the water will make it lean towards a syrup, and ...


1

Is this a 10 gallon batch? The crystal malts are only around 10% of the grist, so I don't think you have a problem there. I would consider 78 F too warm for pitching WLP001, but I doubt that's your problem either. My guess is that the fermentation has slowed down because you under pitched and presumably didn't oxygenate the wort. Each White Labs vial would ...


1

I, too, was always coming up a few points short on my OG. My epiphany was an article in BYO magazine (I think) that explained the need to adjust recipes for one's own equipment and efficiency. My experience lead me to believe that recipes generally use a 72-75% efficiency value, which could explain why those are the defaults in brewing software. I scaled ...


1

Change that batch sparge to a fly sparge if you can. Use a good false bottom with little dead space (something like this works great: http://morebeer.com/products/stainless-steel-false-bottom-12-diameter.html). Also remember that the sparge needs even, unidirectional flow to get the sugars away from the grain. Never stir it if you don't absolutely have to. ...


1

1) 1.041 vs. 1.049 is not a big difference. You might notice the difference but likely won't worry if everything else is in balance. You might taste more hop, since there will be less residual sugar. 2) The bucket is bigger than the carboy to allow for foaming during the first few days of fermentation. But many, many home brewers just go with a carboy and ...



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