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5

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


3

Sounds like you didn't get much saccarification (sugars coverted from starch) in the mash. Causes. 1: poor crush on the grain 2: low diastatic power 3: high water grist ratio 4: mash not long enough Edit: just did the C/F conversions. At 169.7°F your mash was too hot and you denatured your enzymes, causing low diastatic power and giving little ...


2

OG = Original Gravity SG = Specific Gravity FG = Final / Terminal Gravity OG is usually just in reference to a pre fermentation starting gravity, but can be labled OG for any formula that uses a before and after gravity. OG for ABV calculations can be taken at any point once concentration or dilution has been done post boil. It's actually most accurate ...


2

To fix the low gravity I followed Jeff's suggestion and added dry Dextrose/Malt mix. Here's the details in case someone else wants to try this procedure for the first time. I did some calculations in BeerSmith and added 1kg of Dextrose/Malt mix into 1.5L of wort from the fermenter + 1.5L of boiled water. Boiled this then cooled to fermenter temp (24C). This ...


2

You say your boil was weak, and you didn't stir much. Extracts are hard to dissolve properly. Even vigorous boil without stirring may fail to do it. And 10-20 minutes of vigorous stir before wort boils may be barely enough. And it gets worse the less water you have in boil, so partial boil brews are most exposed to this risk. Sugars are heavier than water, ...


2

If you have some dry malt extract (or liquid), you can get the gravity to where you want it now. It's not too late to add the DME, even though it's already in the fermenter. About 1 pound of DME should get you up to about 1.045, which should give you a roughly 5% abv beer.


1

You can use an extract gravity calculator like this one to help you figure out how much extract you'll need. http://brewerslair.com/index.php?p=brewhouse&d=calculators&id=cal22&u=eng Since these calculators are normally for the total gravity of an extract brew, you need to cheat slightly. Gravity is essentially additive, so drop off the 1s (the ...


1

There are a few options, but the most obvious (what I did on my first batch) - Are you sure you added ALL the water? Did you get the +- 21 liters of wort? Otherwise: how cold was the sample you were measuring? The colder it is, the higher the hydrometer will read. You have to take readings at the temp that your hydrometer is calibrated to. Or: Test your ...


1

"add enough water so that the OG would have been 1.062" and "add enough water so that the ABV will be ~6.5%" should be exactly the same amount of water. Check your calculation, if it's different then you have a problem, ie your yeast ate more or less sugar than you expected. Then, it's your call. You can either match OG and have beer you would have brew, or ...



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