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5

What you're looking to do is called high gravity brewing. This technique is oft employed by macro brewers to produce more beer with less fermenter space. They dilute after fermentation is complete. Some Useful Resources: Brew Your Own Article Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 1 Beer and Wine Journal Article Part 2 Some Considerations Yeast Health: ...


4

Yes this is a normal behavior, but not one we like in brewing. We like to see good activity in less than 12 hours. Forget the recomended times in your instructions, they are lost in lag now. Let primary fermentaion complete, then rack secondary if called for. Causes of a long lag time are numerous. Insufficient o2, insufficient nutrients, under pitching, ...


4

You can, of course decrease it by adding water......this calculator will help: http://merrycuss.com/calc/gravityadjustmentwater.html If you don't decrease your gravity a couple of things could happen. First, your yeast might not work, usually different (or more) yeasts are used for high gravity brews. If your yeast does work it might not attenuate fully. ...


3

If you used extract, and you didn't dramatically change the water volumes or add any additional fermentables, then it's highly unlikely that your gravity is that far off. The usual cause with this sort of process is incomplete mixing of the boiled portion added to the water in the carboy, leading you to get a sample of the exceptionally-concentrated boiled ...


2

Did you add water after you put the rest of the stuff in the fermenter? If so you got incomplete mixing and a false OG.


2

In theory a 11g packet contains 220 billion cells, which should do fine for an 18 liter batch. 23 is not such a big difference, so I am sure you are not in any major risk area. With re-hydration you should be good. I am sure that, with the rousing, your beer will get closer to panned FG. Note that, when rousing the yeast bed you will also stir up a lot of ...


2

Is this a 10 gallon batch? The crystal malts are only around 10% of the grist, so I don't think you have a problem there. I would consider 78 F too warm for pitching WLP001, but I doubt that's your problem either. My guess is that the fermentation has slowed down because you under pitched and presumably didn't oxygenate the wort. Each White Labs vial would ...


2

If you have some dry malt extract (or liquid), you can get the gravity to where you want it now. It's not too late to add the DME, even though it's already in the fermenter. About 1 pound of DME should get you up to about 1.045, which should give you a roughly 5% abv beer.


1

You say your boil was weak, and you didn't stir much. Extracts are hard to dissolve properly. Even vigorous boil without stirring may fail to do it. And 10-20 minutes of vigorous stir before wort boils may be barely enough. And it gets worse the less water you have in boil, so partial boil brews are most exposed to this risk. Sugars are heavier than water, ...


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I doubt a weak boil would alter your OG post-topoff. Do you know what the OG was supposed to be? 1.037 is on the lower end for a recipe, but not that uncommon.


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"add enough water so that the OG would have been 1.062" and "add enough water so that the ABV will be ~6.5%" should be exactly the same amount of water. Check your calculation, if it's different then you have a problem, ie your yeast ate more or less sugar than you expected. Then, it's your call. You can either match OG and have beer you would have brew, or ...


1

There are a few options, but the most obvious (what I did on my first batch) - Are you sure you added ALL the water? Did you get the +- 21 liters of wort? Otherwise: how cold was the sample you were measuring? The colder it is, the higher the hydrometer will read. You have to take readings at the temp that your hydrometer is calibrated to. Or: Test your ...


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It could be that starch from the rice was released over time into solution, raising the specific gravity. Starch has the same effect as sugar on specific gravity, as it increases the density of the solution.


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Unless you added more sugars to the wort after taking the OG reading, it wouldn't be possible for the FG to be higher. As you more than likely know, the Hydrometer measures buoyancy of the liquid. The physics of it works like this: Pure water will have a gravity of 1.000. However, the more sugar you add to the water will make it lean towards a syrup, and ...



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