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8

I've made sourdough starter with organic whole-grain flour, as well as one with rye flour. Here's how I made it: Mix the flour with water. Cover and let it develop for 12 hours in dark, draft-free place. Remove half of it, replenish with fresh flour and water, then back to step 1. Once the starter double's itself every 12 hours you start replenishing with ...


7

What you're asking is called the Pasteur Effect: the effect of oxygen on yeast fermentation. Pressure's not a factor. Oxygen is. First, a word about esters. An ester is formed when a molecule of organic acid reacts with a molecule of alcohol. It's a pretty simple reaction and can occur somewhat at room temperature or even below. the smell and taste of the ...


3

I made a hefe with this yeast a few months back and it turned out really really well - strong clove and banana flavours, and a nice yeasty zing to it. I'm planning on doing this again very shortly! With this batch I did two things: I didn't try to control the temperature, I just let it go to whatever it wanted to - I think at one point I measured it at ...


3

I made a great sourdough starter from plumbs growing near my apartment. I prepared a normal water/flour mixture, then put about a half-dozen plumbs in it. They all had that white yeast layer like you see on grapes. After a couple of days, when the plumbs got squishy and it was time to feed the starter again, I mashed the plumbs up to release the sugar. ...


3

The answer is sort of hidden in the inverse of your question: Closed fermentation leads to decreased ester production. It does this through increase pressure in the vessel. It has been well documented that increased pressure slows fermentation and yeast growth to some extent; both of which also suppress ester production to varying degrees. This pressure is ...


2

In the case of yeast in general I think you already have the answer and thats ferment warmer. The primary flavor cmpds from most yeasts you'd be concerned with are esters and temperature increases tend to increase that. In the case of Hefe, a ferulic acid rest in the mash can help create more clove, but I am not aware of any other phenomenon like that ...


2

I imagine that you could put a portion of the wort (a gallon or so) into another vessel with a wider open surface overnight (maybe a big kitchen pot or something), and then pour that into the main portion of the wort once it has gathered up some bugs. Are you inocculating at all, or just trying to see if your "house bugs" are any good?


2

Well, I've done an open fermentation like this for wine. Left a 6G plastic bucket of wine open for primary, covered with some sanitized plastic wrap. Had other problems with the wine (it was neglected for awhile in some hot temperatures, but that's another story!) but the primary turned out just fine. Go for it! Perhaps you could tent the foil (or even ...


2

Answering my own question a year later. I've achieved this successfully by culturing a native wine yeast and then building it up via making multiple starters with DME: Mash up some ripe wine grapes really well and then press off the juice. Say 5 gallons or so. By ripe, I mean 24 brix or so (~1.100 SG). Check the pH. If it's under 3.8, your safe, ...


2

Check out BYO's article great article on the difference between making your beer sour during the boil or making it sour during fermentation. In researching a Flanders Red, I found an article from Raj Apt, How to Make Sour Beer. The BJCP Style 17 also has good reference data. IMHO, most of the really tasty sour beers are getting the sour profile during ...


1

I can't think of any Belgian sour beers that are produced using a sour mash. As far as I can recall, they all use bacteria in the fermenter to achieve it. Of course, that's not to say that you can't use a sour mash to produce a sour beer. I think that there's a Kentucky common that does that.


1

I made a Lambic once from a recipe that called for the yeast out of a bottle of Chimay. I saved the last couple of inches of beer in the bottle and built the yeast up to pitching volume through a series of increasingly larger starters over the course of about a week. It worked pretty good, and the beer turned out great!


1

What I've found so far is certainly not conclusive, but it appears that lambics (probably the most common spontaneously fermented beer) are innoculated in vats with a very large surface area of the wort exposed to air. It's conjecture, but to me this implies that having a very large unrestricted exposure to fresh air (which is at least mildly circulated) is ...



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