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5

No, it doesn't go away - the photochemical reaction produces compounds that do not degrade quickly and are not broken down by the yeast. Professor Beer writes: When light hits beer, it provides the energy necessary to drive a reaction that transforms the iso-alpha-acids into 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. The “thiol” part of that somewhat cumbersome ...


5

The problem could be from temperature, alcohol tolerance and pitching rates. While the solvent character will fade with time to some degree, it can take a many months to do so and will not completely disappear. Although I can't find published figures from Fermentis, S-04 has reportedly an alcohol tolerance of 10-11% in various forums. Your 1.111 beer gives ...


5

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: ...


3

Some people say that it's better to include the IC in your boil (if it's copper) as the copper gives off micronutrients (namely zinc) as well as providing a nucleation point which reduces the chance of boilovers. See Pennies in the Boil


3

You don't want to clean a copper chiller so it is shiny - if you remove the dull color (stable oxide), the metal is more likely to react and form the toxic blue-green oxide (verdigris). http://byo.com/stories/projects-and-equipment/item/1144-metallurgy-for-homebrewers Copper is relatively inert to both wort and beer. With regular use, it will build up ...


3

It's certainly possible - a starter is only fermented to completion, but not conditioned, so byproducts of fermentation, such as acetaldehyde (green apple) and acetolactate (which becomes diacetyl - butter/butterscotch) are still left in the beer. This have low taste thresholds (50ppb for diacetyl), so it doesn't take much for you to notice then. In a ...


1

I am going to answer this question myself, based on additional research. The list of columns in the question is complete. Also, the question has been edited to provide links for a source for each column. I will note that the Focus on Flavor column is often cited as a good study resource for the BJCP exam.


1

The yeast odour can really only come from yeast. After 10-14 days in primary, be sure to leave the carboy to cold condition until the yeast have settled out and the wort looks fairly clear. The apple/cidery flavour does sound like acetaldehyde, which can come from to short conditioning period, oxidation, or contamination by acetic acid bacteria. The ...


1

Green apple aroma is typical of acetaldehyde. It could be the result of oxidation late in the fermentation or when bottling. Leaving it on the yeast helps, as it will reduce some or all of the acetaldehyde to ethanol. References: Pico Brewery, BJCP, BYO


1

As long as it isn't rusted and/or leaking, you're probably fine. If it were me, I'd take some polish to it and make sure to rinse it thoroughly afterwards just to be certain. You may not have to, but my perfectionism would scream at me for any mistakes in the flavor of the beer, even if it had nothing to do with the chiller. I vividly remember having to ...


1

The three major factors that affect shelf life are sanitation, oxidation, and storage conditions. Make sure everything is sanitized post-boil. If you need to touch a hose, wash your hands with anti-bacterial soap, etc. Fermenters, bottles, racking canes, tubing, caps -- everything should be sanitized immediately prior to use. A minor infection might not ...



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