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4

Technically, you can use baker's yeast, but I doubt you'd be as happy as you would by using brewer's yeast. Both yeasts are Saccharomyces cerevisiae, however, they are different strains of the same species that are bred to do two different jobs. Baker's yeast has been bred to produce CO2 and cause bread to rise and brewer's yeast has been bred to survive ...


3

No problem....I go longer than that in buckets regularly. However, dry hopping is one of the few times I still use a secondary. There are interactions between hops and yeast that can increase flowery esters. After experiencing that, I found that I get better dry hop character by getting the beer off the yeast before dry hopping.


2

This sounds like it could be chlorophenols (typically perceived as plasticky / band-aids / medicinal / chemical flavors). If you're not using Chlorine-based sanitizers, this may have been caused by a wild yeast or bacterial infection. The fact that you also noted flocculation (cloudy) and carbonation issues is generally in line with the notion of an ...


2

A cheesy smell usually means you have bacteria in your mash and they have access to oxygen. If this were a sour-mashed beer it would be considered a lost cause at this point. I don't know how this kit is supposed to work, but it's sounds like sanitation is the issue.


2

Carbonation can have a dramatic effect on beer flavor. I suspect your beer is overcarbonated and that's the cause of the off flavor. You can reduce the carbonation by allowing the keg to warm up to room temperature and periodically venting the keg as the CO2 comes out of solution. As suggested by @Pepi, use this chart to determine what you should set your ...


2

Refer to John Palmer's How to Brew chapter on off flavors in beer. He discusses various off flavors that are common, what causes them, and possible corrections so you don't run into the same issues in future batches. Based on the fruity flavor, you may have ester or chlorophenol issues. The esters can produce the fruity flavors and typically result from ...


2

I brew in China, so I kinda know what you're dealing with. But we have Taobao so nearly everything can be obtained online. A quick look at Alibaba would suggest that at least hops and malt extract exist somewhere in India. If you're in an area that has beer, you could also try befriending someone at a brewery. In the absence of that, you should consider ...


2

I have this exact same problem and it started showing up when I went to all grain. Some of the BSG kits I've done use a steeping grain process where the grains are pre-milled and they all turned out great. My extract brews have also been great. In every case I've used the same water source (tap water)... From the first all-grain batch to my latest they have ...


1

My experience with mead is that you should wait. What I do personnally is I bottle (I use twist-cap bottles which are not really air-tight), wait a few months and then siphon again to clean bottles, leaving just a bit more dead yeast at the bottom. My mead usually becomes really clear after about 8 months, and stops tasting yeasty at the same time. It's ...


1

According to my experience it will be sweet and fizzy in taste.


1

You don't mention hops. Without those, it will be sickly sweet.


1

Black malts usually contribute a roasty flavor and color enhancement. As far as I know, they shouldn't impart a fruity flavor. Caramel malts, on the other hand, do. Check your caramalts. Common flavor descriptions for roasted caramel malts between 80L and 120L are "raisin, plum, prunes, burnt sugar". See Castle Malting's Ch√Ęteau Special B or Briess's ...


1

I made two batches that were almost certainly infected/affected by wild yeast (I was experimenting with culturing my own yeast from the dregs of Odell's St. Lupulin) and ended up with a distinct phenolic taste. The maddening thing was that I could taste what the beer was supposed to be right along side the off flavor ... and they were both really good beers, ...


1

Quite simply - that's isn't a beer nor ale, it would just be the creation of alcohol from the yeast and the sugar. There would be no specific flavours to impart or develop from the yeast and I'm not surprised it tastes foul. Your approach is not dissimilar from the process of wine making (that said most brewing involves pretty much the same steps) - ...


1

This Wired article may help shed some light on wavelengths and bottle colour. http://www.wired.com/2013/03/physics-and-green-beer-bottles/ Amendment 1 Light in wavelengths of 350 nm to 520 nm (upper UV to mid-visible light) is known to cause skunky beer. Green bottles allow green light (520 nm to 550 nm) to pass through, whereas brown bottles (ranging ...


1

I've never tasted acetaminophen, but the 130g of black malt is probably your culprit. I made a stout with a similar amount, and the resulting beer was acrid and unpleasant. Aging mellowed it a bit, but it never turned into what I'd call a pleasant beer. For what it's worth, the only roasted malts I use in my stouts are roasted barley, and a small amount of ...


1

I feel like when this happens to one of my brews, the yeast has created a lot of harsh tasting alcohol and combined with the fruit base, it's reminds me of cough syrup. The best thing I can recommend is to let the batch age. There's a good reason why wine can take years before it becomes a good wine.



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