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11

The bubblegum flavor is an ester commonly produced by Belgian yeast. Some of this esters will be processed by the yeast that's left in the bottle over time, but I'm guessing that for the most part the flavor will be there to stay. A longer secondary fermentation could help to clear or diminish the flavor, but now that you are bottled I don't think it will ...


10

Mineral profile of the water and pH are 2 of the leading causes of astringency. Are you experiencing it with a variety if styles or just one? It can be especially prevalent in dark beers if your pH is too low. Dark grains will lower your pH and you need to do something to get it back up into the 5.2-5.4 range. Contrary to the old myth that sparging over ...


9

Green apple flavor is called Acetaldehyde. It's one of the off-flavors that can dissipate over time, though it can be caused from a bacteria that won't go away. I would certainly wait awhile to see if the flavor dissipates. (Sources here)


8

How To Brew by John Palmer contains a good summary of common off flavours: http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html


8

Before I got kegs, I used to bottle with 1.5 liter PET soda bottles (the standard size in Norway.) The beer tasted fine, even after several months, and no hint of soda. I used to soak them for 24-48 hours to remove the labels, then clean thoroughly with PBW or OxiClean. Then sanitize with StarSan. After this, there is no odor from the bottles and, as far ...


7

It's reasonable to assume that something happens in the process of evaporating down to syrup or DME, and that that something differs from a wort made fresh by mashing. From what I've read, it's a combination of sweetness from under-attenuation, and off flavors from the production/storage of syrup. I've not really identified a particular flavor that I ...


7

I'd follow the recommendation for a clean lager. You want to taste the off flavors enough to be able to recognize them, and an ale might cover up what you're looking for. A friend who went to Siebel tells me that they used MGD there. I just finished teaching a BJCP study group and we did off flavors both with the recommendations in the study guide and ...


7

As alcohol levels rise in a beer, eventually you can taste it. There is just no way around that part. However as a brewer you do have control over some of the less desirable tasting higher order (molecularly complex) alcohols. The best way to control the levels of these types of flavors is to pitch plenty of yeast, ferment on the cooler side (that also ...


7

This screams out "mash water problem" to me. Anytime you go from good extract beers, to "bitter/astringent/chalky/burnt" flavors in all grain, you can bet your buns that its a mash water pH problem. Also, a hash pH of 5 sounds really low to me. I shoot for 5.5 on average. Water chemistry for all-grain is honestly the most "sciency" part of home brewing, and ...


6

This may help: From John Palmer's How to Brew: Soapy flavors can caused by not washing your glass very well, but they can also be produced by the fermentation conditions. If you leave the beer in the primary fermentor for a relatively long period of time after primary fermentation is over ("long" depends on the style and other fermentation factors), ...


6

It most certainly is a function of your fermentation profile. Reviewing your temperatures and the amount of yeast you pitch makes a difference. Mead is also a fairly poor nutrient substrate for yeast. The very best mead makers preach about staggered nutrient additions while also degassing the CO2 from the must during the early part of fermentation. ...


5

The bacon flavor could be coming from a couple of different things but it would be hard to pinpoint exactly without a sample. Here are a few things it could be. The first thing is that you can get a smoky flavor from the chocolate malt, the roasted barley, and other dark roasted grain, this happens when you use a larger percentage of these dark grains in ...


5

Sounds like poor sanitation to me. Be sure you sanitized the bottles well, and that you boiled the sugar in some water first. Or a contamination could have been picked up during racking with that equipment or the bottling equipment.


5

Why settle for just one? Try tainting several types of beers. Start by adding the off-flavors to an ounce or two of light lager, in medium-small doses, and identify how they change the beer's nose and taste. After that, you can repeat with an amber, or go even darker to see if you can still perceive the different off-flavors. Commercial beers are ...


5

The general rule is as long as a beer doesn't smell or taste off, it's probably okay to drink. It sounds to me like you have a Lactobacillus infection. Lacto will give the beer a sour taste and that taste will increase over time. That's the white film and flecks. It matches every description I've heard of for a lacto infection. Hopefully others will ...


5

Actually I found an article from BYO that says: Uptake of oxygen late in fermentation leads to excessive diacetyl production. Yeast will begin releasing more alpha acetolactate if oxygen is introduced late in the fermentation. This eventually leads to an increase in diacetyl, so care must be taken to avoid oxygen pickup during beer transfers. ...


5

I had something similar with an Oatmeal Stout I used S-04 with. I fermented it a bit warm (room and pitch temp), but the yeast went totally nuts during the first three days. Overall, it didn't seem to have much bad effect. There was a minor note of fruity/floral-ness that was introduced, which wasn't present in subsequent iterations of the beer, but it was ...


5

I can think of 2 things...it might be CO2 coming from the airlock. It might also be fusel alcohols from fermenting at such high temps. In spite of what Chris White says, my own experience is that my beers come out much better fermenting at lower temps. Don't let someone else tell you what to do when your own experience says otherwise! It might also be a ...


5

The problem could be from temperature, alcohol tolerance and pitching rates. While the solvent character will fade with time to some degree, it can take a many months to do so and will not completely disappear. Although I can't find published figures from Fermentis, S-04 has reportedly an alcohol tolerance of 10-11% in various forums. Your 1.111 beer gives ...


5

No, it doesn't go away - the photochemical reaction produces compounds that do not degrade quickly and are not broken down by the yeast. Professor Beer writes: When light hits beer, it provides the energy necessary to drive a reaction that transforms the iso-alpha-acids into 3-methyl-2-butene-1-thiol. The “thiol” part of that somewhat cumbersome ...


5

Great question on a topic that I don't think is discussed much by homebrewers since we tend to stick to ales. This is a more significant issue for creating clean lagers..or at least a more obvious problem in lagers when present. Greg Noonan's New Brewing Lager Beers is about the only place I've found a solid discussion of the topic. On pp 170-171: ...


4

I've never really gotten "cidery" flavors from adding sugars. From what I've read the sugar needs to be from 40% - 50% to get these flavors. I will say that adding too much sugar to a brew can give you some "hot" alcohol flavors that take time to mellow.


4

It's likely that the flavor was caused by too high a fermentation temp. It might moderate to some extent with cold conditioning, but in my experience it's unlikely that it will ever go away. FWIW, I just kegged a beer made with 3787 and kept under 65F during the entire fermentation. Not a hint of bubblegum.


4

How do you feel about sour beers? I was just reading on The Mad Fermentationist that sour beers often mask their alcohol content with their other pungent aromas and flavors. And since they attenuate more than a normal brew, you get more alcohol for the same starting gravity, so take that into account as well. A 1.080 sour that gets down to 1.005 should be ...


4

When a beer becomes cloudy after it is bottled it often means that there is some sort of bacterial infection. This could have been introduced in the bottle or before and it just took time to develop which may be why it wasn't present in the bottles you consumed first. Some people describe oxidation as a dusty or papery flavor so it may have also suffered ...


4

"Sweet almost caramel-like flavor" doesn't sound like diacetyl to me. Diacetyl is "buttery," and is hard to get in normal Ale fermentations unless you are using a yeast strain known for it. (Ringwood, I think is noted for it?) What yeast did you use, and at what temps? I would attribute "sweet/caramel" flavors in your first batch to more likely be "extract ...


4

My understanding is that the most common cause of sour flavors is a wild yeast or bacteria infestation. In a beer that is deliberately sour, a Brettanomyces yeast strain is introduced along with bacteria to create the sour flavor. Ideas: Do you bake a lot in your home? It is possible that you have airborne yeasts in your home if you bake bread at all. Try ...


4

How would you describe the off flavor? Most likely scenario is that the beer picked up an infection somewhere between primary and the keg. Maybe you've got something funky growing in your lagering fridge? In the jumper hose? The keg itself? I'd suggest replacing all the beer line, and sanitizing anything you get bleach on.


4

It could be from bacterial contamination, old yeast, or from stale ingredients. BJCP page, Mead Faults, lists some typical causes: Vegetal Smell or taste of plants or green vegetables. Cooked, canned or rotten vegetable (cabbage, celery, onion, asparagus, parsnip) aroma and flavor: Encourage a fast, vigorous fermentation (use a healthy, active ...


4

Upvote on the question, and someone will undoubtedly come by with a better answer, but here goes off the top of my head: Acetaldehyde (a-cee-tal-de-hide....nobody says it right!) is a precursor to alcohol. It is an intermediate compound that is formed prior to the formation of EtOH/ethanol during fermentation. So the weird thing is that acetaldehyde is ...



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